What to do when your doctor retires

What do you do when your GP retires? Melissa Dcosta gets the answers for you.

Finding a good general practitioner (GP) is an uphill task, especially when the one you are comfortable with decides to retire, leaving you to find a new one in his/her place. Most of us have grown up going to the same GP our parents went to, and the same pattern follows if women get married and stay close to their in-laws thus switching to their in-laws' GP.

However, \what do you do when you have to move to another city or your GP retires?

Why you need to do your R&D?
A personal physician is a patient's link to the medical world and not only provides medical treatment but is also instrumental in recommending medical specialists as and when required. Hence, when a trusted physician retires, it's important to find someone who can continue to provide the same quality of health care that you are accustomed to. So, you have to do your research before you zone in on a potential physician who can take your GP's place.

A doc for all seasons
Identify your needs and requirements. Every age and ailment requires specific health care. If you have senior citizens in the family you will need a geriatric physician who can cater to their needs. If you have kids in the family, a pediatrician should be on your speed dial, while adults can make do with a doctor of internal medicine.

Weigh your priorities
Different people would consider different factors while deciding on a GP, proximity to your residence may be crucial for some while credentials and availability may take precedence for others.

How to find a new GP?
A doc from a doc The easiest way to find a GP, is to ask your current one to recommend one to you. This makes sense because he/she is aware of your medical history and has the contacts in the medical world and can recommend someone who suits your needs. Phone a friend Ask friends and relatives if they know a good GP. Find out about his/her approach? Whether he/she is effective and easily available? Look up the net The internet has a large database of information. Use it to your advantage. You can also request a list of doctors from your insurance provider or the local hospital.

Anil G Ballani, a consultant physician, says, "The practice of looking up GPs on the net is not very common in our country as people generally find one through wordof-mouth. However, each locality has a database of doctors who specialise in different fields, and most of these do have their own sites. So, that can also help you in finding a doctor who suits your medical needs and requirements."

Meet the potential GP before you decide Make an appointment with the the one you are considering as an option. Carry your medical documents so that you can discuss your health requirements and pay attention to how well the GP addresses your concerns. If you are not comfortable with his/her approach make an appointment with the next potential health care expert on your list of potentials.
What do you do when your GP retires? Melissa Dcosta gets the answers for you.

Finding a good general practitioner (GP) is an uphill task, especially when the one you are comfortable with decides to retire, leaving you to find a new one in his/her place. Most of us have grown up going to the same GP our parents went to, and the same pattern follows if women get married and stay close to their in-laws thus switching to their in-laws' GP.

However, \what do you do when you have to move to another city or your GP retires?

Why you need to do your R&D?
A personal physician is a patient's link to the medical world and not only provides medical treatment but is also instrumental in recommending medical specialists as and when required. Hence, when a trusted physician retires, it's important to find someone who can continue to provide the same quality of health care that you are accustomed to. So, you have to do your research before you zone in on a potential physician who can take your GP's place.

A doc for all seasons
Identify your needs and requirements. Every age and ailment requires specific health care. If you have senior citizens in the family you will need a geriatric physician who can cater to their needs. If you have kids in the family, a pediatrician should be on your speed dial, while adults can make do with a doctor of internal medicine.

Weigh your priorities
Different people would consider different factors while deciding on a GP, proximity to your residence may be crucial for some while credentials and availability may take precedence for others.

How to find a new GP?
A doc from a doc The easiest way to find a GP, is to ask your current one to recommend one to you. This makes sense because he/she is aware of your medical history and has the contacts in the medical world and can recommend someone who suits your needs. Phone a friend Ask friends and relatives if they know a good GP. Find out about his/her approach? Whether he/she is effective and easily available? Look up the net The internet has a large database of information. Use it to your advantage. You can also request a list of doctors from your insurance provider or the local hospital.

Anil G Ballani, a consultant physician, says, "The practice of looking up GPs on the net is not very common in our country as people generally find one through wordof-mouth. However, each locality has a database of doctors who specialise in different fields, and most of these do have their own sites. So, that can also help you in finding a doctor who suits your medical needs and requirements."

Meet the potential GP before you decide Make an appointment with the the one you are considering as an option. Carry your medical documents so that you can discuss your health requirements and pay attention to how well the GP addresses your concerns. If you are not comfortable with his/her approach make an appointment with the next potential health care expert on your list of potentials.

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