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I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu


Discussions on "I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu" in "General Pregnancy" forum.


  1. #11
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    vaishnav is offline Commander's of Penmai
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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    It used to be thought that pregnancy was a time when women needed to eat for two. This old chestnut has been proven wrong many times though as a suburban myth, it still has some devotees. The scientific evidence is, that it is not so much the quantity of food which needs to increase, so much as the quality of the nutrients contained in the food.
    The general recommendation from (Australian) experts is that during pregnancy you will need more kilojoules in your diet than usual, but certainly not double. By the third trimester this will mean an increase of about 14% in normal kilojoule intake.
    What makes the difference during pregnancy?

    During pregnancy, a mother’s metabolic rate increases and her body becomes much more efficient at utilising the nutrients in her diet. Because of the slowing down in most pregnant women’s activity levels, the extra kilojoules which are not being used up in energy tend to be absorbed within her higher metabolic rate.
    Why can’t I eat what I want to?

    Too much energy (food) for the amount being used (exercise) will end up stored on your body as fat. Women who gain too much weight during their pregnancy tend to have more difficult births and a higher rate of caesarian section deliveries. Pre-eclampsia, PIH (Pregnancy Induced Hypertension) and Gestational Diabetes are all more common in women who gain more than the recommended 10-14 kilograms weight increase during pregnancy.
    Developing gestational diabetes increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life. For a lot of women, gaining excess weight during their pregnancy is a catalyst for long term weight issues. Conversely, limiting kilojoule intake during pregnancy with the mistaken belief it will mean an easier or less painful childbirth is not true. Babies who are born small for their gestational age or underweight struggle with all sorts of problems; intellectually, developmentally and physically. Children of mothers who do not gain sufficient weight during their pregnancy are also at an increased risk of heart disease and diabetes as adults.
    Don’t be frightened of fats

    Two very important fats are necessary to include in your overall pregnancy nutrition. Docosahexanoic Acid (DHA) and Arachidonic Acid (AA). These fatty acids are vital for the development of your baby’s eyesight and brain. The best way to ensure you have a healthy intake is to eat oily fish such as sardines, salmon and mackerel. It you cannot tolerate fish, consider taking a quality supplement. But check with your health care provider first.
    Increase these nutrients in your pregnancy diet

    • More iron, especially haem iron from animal sources. Non-haem iron from green leafy vegetables is not as well absorbed by the body and you will need to eat much more of it to gain the same nutritional benefits. Even some percentage of haem iron in your diet will help your body to be more efficient in absorbing the non-haem iron from your food.
    • Vitamin A, but only in small amounts. Too much Vitamin A is toxic to the body and can be lethal. Some experts warn against eating liver during pregnancy as it is very high in this nutrient. Fruits and vegetables which are yellow or orange are high in Vitamin A, so include some carrots, pumpkin and squash in your diet. Be careful though, too much can stain your skin and you’ll end up looking like you’ve had a spray tan gone wrong.
    • The B group vitamins will help you to maintain general good health and wellness. They support the nervous system and brain pathways to function effectively. Good sources are wholemeal cereals and grains, green leafy vegetables, nuts and bananas. Avocados and mangoes are other excellent sources.
    • Vitamin C is what is known as a water soluble vitamin which means it is excreted in the urine. Too much cannot be stored by your body or your baby, so it is important to ensure you have an adequate intake every day. Vitamin C will also help you fight infection, boost your immune system, help with the absorption of iron in your diet and will help your tissues heal after birth. Good sources are citrus fruits, berries, fresh fruit juices, pawpaw, and cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and Brussels sprouts.
    • Calcium and Vitamin D. Dairy foods, milk and fortified soy products are good sources, so try for 2-4 servings each day. A small amount of filtered sunlight each day, before 10am and after 3pm is good for boosting Vitamin D intake. If you have dark skin, or cover a lot of your skin due to cultural or religious conventions, speak with your midwife or doctor regarding the need for a daily supplement.
    • Vitamin E is what is known as a fat soluble vitamin, which means it is one of the vitamins which can accumulate in your body. Vitamin E helps to support healthy eyes and skin and is known to help the body rid itself of free radicals; those nasty aging compounds. In pregnancy, Vitamin E will help your baby’s nervous system development as well as its muscle growth. Nuts, vegetable oils including olive oil, legumes and seeds are all excellent sources.
    • Protein, to help your baby grow. Rich protein sources have generally walked on legs so think all sources of meat and chicken. Your protein requirements will increase by around 15-20% even in the early weeks of pregnancy, purely because of the muscles, bones and organs which your baby is developing. Aim for 2-3 serves of quality, lean protein every day.
    • Iodine, zinc, magnesium, copper and chromium. These elements are only needed in trace amounts though can be found in fresh fruits and vegetables, legumes and beans, nuts and peas. Try to eat foods which resemble their original source as much as possible. Be suspicious about foods wrapped in lots of plastic and which have ingredient lists a mile long.
    • Carbohydrates are vital for energy. Two different forms of carbohydrate are important but one more so than the other. Simple carbohydrates are in sugar, cakes and biscuits, the foods you may crave when you are pregnant. Think of what’s inside the glass cabinet at the corner bakery and you’ll have some good understanding. More complex carbohydrates are on the racks at the back, especially the whole grain breads and rolls. Brown rice, wholegrain flour, wholemeal pasta and potatoes are also quality sources of carbohydrates and are good to prevent constipation.
    • If you are vegetarian or vegan, think about consulting with a dietician to ensure you are getting adequate, first class nutrition during your pregnancy. You need to ensure you are getting enough iron and vitamin B12 in particular, which are vital so you do not become anaemic. You will also need to ensure your protein and calcium intakes are adequate.

    How to maximise the nutrients in your diet

    • Follow the guidelines above to ensure you are eating sufficient quantities of each nutrient per day.
    • Think about taking your own lunch to work. Although it takes a little planning, home prepared foods tend to be more healthy than take-away. Avoid bringing too many convenience foods into the house and make lists before you go grocery shopping. Think about how important your pregnancy nutrition is, not only for your own health but for your developing baby as well.
    • When you prepare fruits and vegetables for eating, aim to peel and chop them immediately before you place them in your mouth. Vitamins can be oxidised and lost into the air as soon as their protective skins are removed. Buy fresh, from large, busy shops where the turn over of stock is likely to be quicker with less storage time.
    • Remember, to reach for the fresher produce which is generally placed at the back of the rows. Heavier fruits and vegetables usually contain more juice and taste better.
    • If you’re too busy to shop regularly, consider joining a fruit and vegie co-op where produce is bought directly from the market and family groups join together. Farmer’s markets and ordering on-line are other practical alternatives.
    • Use minimal water for cooking and if you’re particularly keen, you can drink this or use it in soups or stock. Avoid cooking vegetables and fruit for long periods as this leads to excess vitamin destruction.
    • Tinned, frozen, dried and stewed fruits offer reasonable alternatives to fresh fruit if it is not available.
    • Each colour in a vegetable or fruit indicates a different range of nutrients. So aim for a diverse range of colour on your plate. Not only will it look good but will offer you a wide range of antioxidants and nutrients for you and your baby.
    • Avoid taking vitamin/mineral supplements unless they have been prescribed for you. Folic acid is the exception. Many nutrients are not stored by the body and are excreted in urine and faeces.
    • The absorption of zinc can be interfered with by iron, particularly if you are taking supplements. If you have been prescribed iron tablets, try to avoid taking them when you are eating foods rich in zinc. These are meat, bananas, seafood and nuts.



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  2. #12
    Preethikas is offline Newbie
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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    Thanks for your reply.
    one more question is that can i eat fenugreek powder/vendhayam powder in early pregnancy?

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  3. #13
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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    Quote Originally Posted by Preethikas View Post
    Thanks for your tips. Can you please tell me, can i eat sundakkai? And what are all adviced list of fruits, vegetables, nuts, Dahl or paruppu, non-veg i can eat? Can i eat raagi? For iron what are all food i can eat?
    First regarding sundakkai, It is rich in Vitamin C. It is called Turkey berry in English. sundakkai is good for: Kids should eat twice weekly to prevent worms in the stomach. Asthma patients should eat daily to prevent breathlessness. Pregnant women can eat once a month.
    Benefits: Kills Worms, germs. Reduces cold. Activates and strengthens lungs.

    Regarding other best food items you have to eat during your pregnancy are as follows:


    1. Avocados: Loaded with folic acid (vital to forming your baby's brain and nervous system), potassium, vitamin C, and vitamin B6 (which not only helps baby's tissue and brain growth, but may also help with your morning sickness), avocados are a delicious way to get your vitamins. Spread some ripe avocado on your whole grain roll as a healthy substitute for mayo. Keep in mind that avocados are high in fat (though the very good kind) and calories, so heap them on your plate only if you're having trouble gaining weight.
    2. Broccoli: America's favorite cruciferous vegetable, packed with plenty of vitamins A and C, with a calcium bonus (better to build those baby bones with), as well as baby-friendly folic acid. Toss into pasta or casseroles, stir-fry with seafood or chicken, serve steamed (with or without a vinaigrette), or dunk in dip.
    3. Carrots: What's up, Doc? Here's what: Carrots are tops when it comes to vitamin A, so important for the development of your baby's bones, teeth, and eyes. They're perfect for munching on the go, but they also shred neatly into almost anything (from salads to meatloaf to cakes to muffins). Carrots are also a good source of vitamins B6 and C, and fiber to keep things movin'.
    4. DHA eggs: The old egg is still a good egg, delivering a low-calorie, high-protein punch in a tasty little bundle. But here's news: Science now lets us scramble, fry, or boil better eggs, naturally loaded with DHA, one type of omega-3 fatty acid (the "good fat") that is a primary component of the brain and retina, and is essential for brain development and eye formation in the fetus. Plus, they taste just like the eggs you've always loved.
    5. Edamame: These green pods are actually cooked soybeans — and they taste so much better than they sound. Packed with protein, calcium, folic acid, and vitamins A and B, edamame can be scooped up by the handful as a snack (salt them lightly, and you'll never miss the chips), or tossed into just about anything you're cooking, from soups, to pasta, to casseroles, to succotash, to stir-fry. They also make a gas-free stand-in for beans. So don't forget the edamame, Mommy.
    6. Lentils: Branch into beans for folic acid and protein, vitamin B6, and iron. Lentils are the most intestine (and spouse) friendly legume and readily absorb a variety of flavors from other foods and seasonings.
    7. Mangoes: Sweet revenge for any vegetable avoider, mangoes contain more vitamins A and C bite for delicious bite than a salad. This tropical favorite, also packed with potassium, is especially versatile, a perfect complement to sweet and savory dishes. Blend it into smoothies or soups, chop it up in salsas or relishes, simply scoop and enjoy.
    8. Nuts: Nuts are chock-full of important minerals (copper, manganese, magnesium, selenium, zinc, potassium, and even calcium) and vitamin E. And even though they're high in fat, it's mainly the good-for-you kind — especially baby- brain-boosting DHA, which is found in walnuts. So in a nutshell, go nuts with nuts (in moderation if you're gaining quickly, liberally if you're gaining slowly) and toss them into salads, pasta, meat, or fish dishes, and baked goods.
    9. Oatmeal: Here's good reason to feel your oats (and eat them often). They're full of fiber, the B vitamins, and iron and a host of other minerals. Fill your breakfast bowl with them, but don't stop there. You can add oats — and all their nutritional super powers — to pancakes, muffins, cakes, cookies, even meatloaf.
    10. Red pepper: A super-source of vitamins A and C, with plenty of B6 in the bargain, a red pepper is one of nature's sweetest ways to eat your vegetables. Enjoy their sweet crunch as a crudité, with or without dip (they make the perfect take-along snack). Chop them into salsa, slice them into stir-fries and pasta dishes, or roast or grill them (with a little olive oil, garlic, and lemon) and serve them up in sandwiches, salads, or antipastos.
    11. Spinach: Rich in folic acid, iron (which you need for all those blood cells, Baby!), vitamin A, and calcium, spinach now comes completely ready to eat in prewashed bags (free of sand). Eat it raw, in a salad (especially one with almonds and mandarin oranges), or as a wilted bed for fish or chicken, or layered in lasagna.
    12. Yogurt: Cup for cup, yummy yogurt contains as much calcium as milk — but it's packed with protein and folic acid too. Blend it with fruit into satisfying smoothies, layer with granola in a breakfast parfait, use it as a low-calorie substitute for sour cream or mayo in sandwich fillings, dips, and salad dressings, or simply spoon it out of the carton (no matter where you're headed today, a container of yogurt's always easy to find). And here's another reason to find culture: The active cultures in yogurt (also known as good bacteria) can prevent stomach upset, as well as yeast infections.

    Of course, this A list is just a short list. There are plenty of other nutritional overachievers to choose from, including whole grains of all kinds, seeds (especially omega-3-rich flax), yams and winter squash, apricots, kiwi (one small kiwi contains as much vitamin C as an orange, plus it's unparalleled for its laxative effects), papaya — and much more.

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  4. #14
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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    Quote Originally Posted by Preethikas View Post
    Thanks for your reply.
    one more question is that can i eat fenugreek powder/vendhayam powder in early pregnancy?
    Dear Preethi,

    Traditionally, fenugreek has been used to stimulate labor. However, this does not mean that it is safe or effective for such use, since it has never been studied for such purposes. For instance, think about the many strange ways women try to induce labor (such as eating kiwi, eating spicy foods, or taking bumpy car rides). There is no real way to know if these methods are effective, even if they work. It could very easily just be coincidence.

    Even though there is no research to suggest that fenugreek works for stimulating labor, it is a good idea to avoid taking it unless you are full term 37 weeks or beyond If fenugreek does happen to be effective for stimulating contractions of uterine which is currently unknown, it could cause preterm labor or miscarriages if taken earlier in pregnancy. Also, there have been reports of body or urine odor smelling like maple syrup in infants after fenugreek was used for labor stimulation (the herb contains a compound that smells like maple syrup). Sometimes, this is mistaken by medical providers as a rare but serious condition known as maple syrup disease.

    Pregnancy is not a time to be experimenting with herbs or medications. It is best to stick with products that are known to be safe for pregnant women. As an herb that has been studied very little, fenugreek is not one of these products.

    If you are pregnant, it is always a good idea to have a discussion with your doctor before taking fenugreek or any medication or supplement If your naturopathy (siddha or ayurvedic) doctor recommends to take vendhayam or fenugreek, it may be wise to double-check with an English (Allopathic) doctor just to be safe.

    Geetha A likes this.

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