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I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu


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  1. #1
    Preethikas is offline Newbie
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    I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    No, Horsegram(kollu) and bajra are considered to be body heating foods and normally it is recommended to be avoided in the preganancy to prevent miscarriage.

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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    Thanks for your advice. Can i drink fresh carrot or Apple juice?

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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    Hi Preethi,
    Eating whole fruit is better than juice. I had Kambu Kanji / Kollu chutney after 5 th month of both pregnancies. I didn't have issues. But elders advices to avoid papaya, kambu, kollu, pine apple and Ellu . It depends on your body temperature. Choose wisely

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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    Jiuces, even made fresh is not advisable as it will trigger your gestational diabetes. eating as a whole fruit is always good for health. occasional intake is fine but not recommended for everyday as juice..
    Quote Originally Posted by Preethikas View Post
    Thanks for your advice. Can i drink fresh carrot or Apple juice?


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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    Thanks for your tips. Can you please tell me, can i eat sundakkai? And what are all adviced list of fruits, vegetables, nuts, Dahl or paruppu, non-veg i can eat? Can i eat raagi? For iron what are all food i can eat?

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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    http://www.penmai.com/forums/health-...pregnancy.html

    and also http://www.penmai.com/forums/health-...ant-women.html

    hey check this out!!! and also browse through health and nutrition subforum in pregancy forum.
    Quote Originally Posted by Preethikas View Post
    Thanks for your tips. Can you please tell me, can i eat sundakkai? And what are all adviced list of fruits, vegetables, nuts, Dahl or paruppu, non-veg i can eat? Can i eat raagi? For iron what are all food i can eat?


    Last edited by nlakshmi; 2nd Jan 2013 at 06:25 PM. Reason: adding content
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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    Natural nutritional diet for pregnant women

    There are two types of required nutrients, for a human being or any other living, through out its life. They are:
    Micro nutrients
    Macro nutrients.
    Micro nutrients: These are required in small portions, through out our life such as Vitamins, Minerals, Enzymes and Fibre.
    Macro Nutrients: These are required in large portions, through out our life such as Carbohydrates, Proteins and Fats.

    Proteins are the building blocks of a human body. It helps to grow skin, nail, hair and internal organs. Next to water, protein is the most plentiful substance in the body. Hence Itís required for pregnant woman to take more proteins, which helps for the growth of the baby. Hence 150 grams of protein to be taken by a pregnant woman.
    Natural diet with all the natural micro and macro nutrients and for pregnant women.
    NATURAL DIET:

    In the morning, as soon as you get up, drink 1 litre of water with empty stomach, which helps to cleanse the whole body and intestine. During pregnancy, your body needs more water to cope with the demands of your changing body. It helps to prevent from urinary infections and helps to relieve symptoms of morning sickness, heartburns and indigestion.

    Walk for about half an hour and for 15 minutes Pranayamam (Breathing exercise) and Yoga. Pranayamam and Yoga can be done, only if you have a good guidance or if you have experience of doing before pregnancy.

    Drink vegetable juice, prepared from carrot, beetroot, cucumber, tomato, ridge gourd, bitter gourd, wheat grass and lettuce. To prepare the vegetable juice, the above mentioned 3 or 4 veggies can be used at a time. Use beet root little portion only. By drinking vegetable juice in the morning, supplements vitamins and minerals which help to balance nutrients in blood.

    For breakfast, macronutrients like proteins and carbohydrates needs to be provided. Macro nutrients can be given in the following.

    i) Whole night soaked ground nuts: Ground nuts have the second highest protein in it, whilst the soya beans in the first place. In take of soya beans explained in the coming information.
    ii) Small portion of coconut. White flesh of the coconut helps in building the muscles of thin and emaciated individuals. Coconut can mainly supplement, dietary fibre, Monounsaturated fats, Carbohydrates.
    iii) The most important nutrient is calcium, can be supplemented from dates and sesame seeds. Sesame seeds have the highest calcium in it. It can be mixed with dates for better taste and also for more calcium.
    iv) Have more sprouts made by lentils (black eyed beans), green gram (pesalu), and chick peas. If not, sprouts, it can be taken as boiled beans, once after, soaked the whole night. And also, add walnut for omega3 fatty acids and almonds and cashew nuts in your breakfast.
    We might gain weight by taking more protein food. But itís responsibly to give birth to a healthy baby. The strong foundation for a baby can be acquired from the motherís womb. We can take care of the weight reduction, once after the delivery.

    For lunch, have unpolished rice from which B-Complex can be supplemented. In few countries, people donít consume much rice. Those people can have whole meal bread from which iron can be supplemented. Have daily green leafy vegetables for curry like spinach, broccoli, curry leaves. Green leafy vegetables can supplement iron. Hence itís important to have green leafy vegetable in lunch menu daily. As explained, earlier Soya beans have the highest protein in it. Since it cannot be eaten raw boiled one, it can be mixed with any vegetable curry for good taste and for good proteins. Apart from vegetable curry, have mung dal and toor dal in the alternate days. These are the main south Indian recepies mostly consumed. Have one or two cups of curd.

    After lunch itís advisable to take rest for one or two hours. Remember to keep your mind with peace and stress free all the time, especially during pregnancy.


    In the evening, drink citrus fruit juice which has vitamin C, helps to build good resistance power.


    Have dinner as early as possible, advisable before 7pm. So that by the time we go to bed, baby can have enough space for good moments, which is very healthy for a baby and mother too. For dinner, again advisable to have unpolished rice if not available, then whole meal bread is preferable.


    Do Not Eat For TwoMany pregnant women wrongly think that they should eat for two. Note that you need only 200-300 extra calories daily in pregnancy, i.e. a cup of reduced fat milk or yogurt and a medium orange. This is because your body actually absorbs more nutrients from food you eat during pregnancy.
    Researchers say that pregnant women should avoid eating for two since too much weight gain is linked with complications at birth. Pregnant women who eat fried foods and dairy products and food for two are more likely to gain as much as 35 pounds.
    Women with vegetarian diets and eating more monounsaturated fat found in olive oil and nuts in early pregnancy are half as likely to gain an unhealthy amount of weight.

    Just eat as much as you need and dont over eat. Eating for your satisfaction is enough for the baby too so over eating will not help in any way.





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  9. #9
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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    Pregnancy eating

    Even if you already consider yourself healthy there are some important things to keep in mind now that you are eating for two. As a basic rule, fresh is best, and getting more fruit and vegetables into your diet is one of the best ways to bump up your intake of vitamins and minerals. However, because there are some big changes going on in your life, when it comes to food there are some things to be more careful of.
    What to eat during pregnancy

    Always be aware of what NOT to eat during pregnancy (see below) and eat healthy, unprocessed foods, particularly lots of vegetables. Red and white meat, seafood, dairy products and cereals will also help you to meet nutritional requirements. If you’re vegetarian, ensure you’re getting enough iron and other nutrients found in meat and seafood. Some key vitamins and nutrients that are essential for you and baby include:

    • Vitamins A, B, C, D and E
    • Calcium
    • Folic acid
    • Omega 3
    • Protein
    • Iron
    • Zinc
    • Iodine

    For more on what to eat during pregnancy, see our pregnancy nutrition and foods during pregnancy information.
    Foods to avoid during pregnancy

    There are a few types of foods to avoid during pregnancy as they could potentially cause problems during pregnancy and throughout your child’s life:

    • Foods that may contain the bacterium Listeria: soft cheeses, uncooked ‘deli’ style meats, sushi and unpasteurised milk and milk products
    • Foods high in mercury: raw fish and predatory fish that are high in mercury should be avoided. These include shark, swordfish and barramundi. A good alternative is salmon, which is relatively low in mercury
    • Alcohol and caffeine should be avoided
    • Pregnancy diet and morning sickness

    • Listen to your body’s signals that you want to eat or you don’t. Try to avoid eating something you dislike just because it is good for you. It is important to maintain your hydration even if you can’t tolerate too much food. Sips of water, cups of weak tea, fruit smoothies, cereal with low fat milk and even flat lemonade are good fluid options.
    • Keep a container of crackers and a glass of water on your bedside table. Even before your feet touch the floor in the mornings, make sure you have something in your stomach other than your digestive enzymes.
    • Ask your partner to cook the family meals until you feel better. This may not be until after your first trimester. The sight and smell of raw meat can simply be too much for many pregnant women, so avoid it if you need to.
    • Have a glass of milk and something light to eat just before you go to sleep at night.
    • Avoid very spicy, fatty or ultra sweet foods. Bland, easy to digest foods such as rice, pasta, noodles, sandwiches, fruit and toast are all good alternatives.

    General dietary guidelines during pregnancy

    • Don’t skip meals or leave hours to lapse between eating. Aim for 5-6 small to moderate sized meals every day which don’t leave you feeling too full.
    • Eat breakfast, even if you usually don’t. It really is the most important meal of the day and will help to restore your body’s blood sugar levels to a healthy range after fasting for so many hours.
    • Avoid getting caught up in the “trap” of subscribing to diets which are said to eliminate toxins from your body. Unless you have problems with your liver and kidney function, you are unlikely to have any concerns. If in doubt, check with your midwife or doctor.
    • Aim to have a healthy relationship with food where you see it as fuel for your body and a means of functioning at your capacity. Take time to think about what foods are good for you and your baby rather than letting your taste-buds always drive the decisions about what you eat.
    • Don’t limit the range or variety of the foods in your pregnancy diet. Your baby will taste the flavours of the foods you eat when it swallows the amniotic fluid. This will prime their taste buds so that when they are old enough for solid food, around 6 months of age, they will be more receptive to a greater range of tastes.
    • Have some form of calcium in your breakfast. Cereal drenched in milk, yoghurt, milky tea or coffee, or cheese on toast will help to correct the deficit of calcium in your bones which has been used up overnight. Bones are living tissue and like a bank account, they need regular deposits of calcium and vitamin D to stay strong.
    • Keep snacks and nibbles on hand wherever you are. In the first trimester when nausea and vomiting is common, eating something can make all the difference to how you feel.
    • Give in to cravings if you’re having them. As long as they’re not for inedible foods (Pica) there is often a biological reason for the cravings which pregnant women have. A craving for oranges or tomatoes for example, makes perfect sense because vitamin C is needed by the body to help absorb iron from foods.
    • Give up alcohol. The truth is there is no proven, safe level for pregnant women to drink and the only way to ensure you’re not having too much is to have none. Rediscover soft drinks, fresh fruit juices, soda water with a squeeze of lime or lemon juice or just plain tap water. The added fluoride will make its way to your baby’s jaw where their teeth and their enamel coating will be forming.
    • Don’t forget to buy iodised salt when you shop. Pregnant women need this important element for their own healthy thyroid function. Importantly, their baby needs it to boost their IQ. Seafood, iodine fortified bread, green leafy vegetables and eggs are other good sources.
    • Eating at buffet or salad bars can be risky. Only eat foods that you are confident have not been sitting out for too long
    • Read labels and become familiar with the nutritional information of the foods you eat. The general rule is that the greatest concentration of a food component is placed first on the ingredient list. Manufacturers have to itemise contents in descending order. If you have problems pronouncing a particular ingredient or don’t recognise it as a food type, chances are it is not going to be very good for you or your baby.

    Pregnancy complications and diet

    Sometimes pregnancy can bring about unwelcome changes within the body. Health problems such as gestational diabetes, iodine deficiency, anaemia, preeclampsia, high blood pressure and hyperemesis gravidarum are just a few common issues pregnant mums-to-be can experience. Occasionally what you’re eating can play a large part in feeling better and easing or managing symptoms


  10. #10
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    Re: I am pregnant. Can i eat kollu and kambu

    It used to be thought that pregnancy was a time when women needed to eat for two. This old chestnut has been proven wrong many times though as a suburban myth, it still has some devotees. The scientific evidence is, that it is not so much the quantity of food which needs to increase, so much as the quality of the nutrients contained in the food.
    The general recommendation from (Australian) experts is that during pregnancy you will need more kilojoules in your diet than usual, but certainly not double. By the third trimester this will mean an increase of about 14% in normal kilojoule intake.
    What makes the difference during pregnancy?

    During pregnancy, a mother’s metabolic rate increases and her body becomes much more efficient at utilising the nutrients in her diet. Because of the slowing down in most pregnant women’s activity levels, the extra kilojoules which are not being used up in energy tend to be absorbed within her higher metabolic rate.
    Why can’t I eat what I want to?

    Too much energy (food) for the amount being used (exercise) will end up stored on your body as fat. Women who gain too much weight during their pregnancy tend to have more difficult births and a higher rate of caesarian section deliveries. Pre-eclampsia, PIH (Pregnancy Induced Hypertension) and Gestational Diabetes are all more common in women who gain more than the recommended 10-14 kilograms weight increase during pregnancy.
    Developing gestational diabetes increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life. For a lot of women, gaining excess weight during their pregnancy is a catalyst for long term weight issues. Conversely, limiting kilojoule intake during pregnancy with the mistaken belief it will mean an easier or less painful childbirth is not true. Babies who are born small for their gestational age or underweight struggle with all sorts of problems; intellectually, developmentally and physically. Children of mothers who do not gain sufficient weight during their pregnancy are also at an increased risk of heart disease and diabetes as adults.
    Don’t be frightened of fats

    Two very important fats are necessary to include in your overall pregnancy nutrition. Docosahexanoic Acid (DHA) and Arachidonic Acid (AA). These fatty acids are vital for the development of your baby’s eyesight and brain. The best way to ensure you have a healthy intake is to eat oily fish such as sardines, salmon and mackerel. It you cannot tolerate fish, consider taking a quality supplement. But check with your health care provider first.
    Increase these nutrients in your pregnancy diet

    • More iron, especially haem iron from animal sources. Non-haem iron from green leafy vegetables is not as well absorbed by the body and you will need to eat much more of it to gain the same nutritional benefits. Even some percentage of haem iron in your diet will help your body to be more efficient in absorbing the non-haem iron from your food.
    • Vitamin A, but only in small amounts. Too much Vitamin A is toxic to the body and can be lethal. Some experts warn against eating liver during pregnancy as it is very high in this nutrient. Fruits and vegetables which are yellow or orange are high in Vitamin A, so include some carrots, pumpkin and squash in your diet. Be careful though, too much can stain your skin and you’ll end up looking like you’ve had a spray tan gone wrong.
    • The B group vitamins will help you to maintain general good health and wellness. They support the nervous system and brain pathways to function effectively. Good sources are wholemeal cereals and grains, green leafy vegetables, nuts and bananas. Avocados and mangoes are other excellent sources.
    • Vitamin C is what is known as a water soluble vitamin which means it is excreted in the urine. Too much cannot be stored by your body or your baby, so it is important to ensure you have an adequate intake every day. Vitamin C will also help you fight infection, boost your immune system, help with the absorption of iron in your diet and will help your tissues heal after birth. Good sources are citrus fruits, berries, fresh fruit juices, pawpaw, and cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and Brussels sprouts.
    • Calcium and Vitamin D. Dairy foods, milk and fortified soy products are good sources, so try for 2-4 servings each day. A small amount of filtered sunlight each day, before 10am and after 3pm is good for boosting Vitamin D intake. If you have dark skin, or cover a lot of your skin due to cultural or religious conventions, speak with your midwife or doctor regarding the need for a daily supplement.
    • Vitamin E is what is known as a fat soluble vitamin, which means it is one of the vitamins which can accumulate in your body. Vitamin E helps to support healthy eyes and skin and is known to help the body rid itself of free radicals; those nasty aging compounds. In pregnancy, Vitamin E will help your baby’s nervous system development as well as its muscle growth. Nuts, vegetable oils including olive oil, legumes and seeds are all excellent sources.
    • Protein, to help your baby grow. Rich protein sources have generally walked on legs so think all sources of meat and chicken. Your protein requirements will increase by around 15-20% even in the early weeks of pregnancy, purely because of the muscles, bones and organs which your baby is developing. Aim for 2-3 serves of quality, lean protein every day.
    • Iodine, zinc, magnesium, copper and chromium. These elements are only needed in trace amounts though can be found in fresh fruits and vegetables, legumes and beans, nuts and peas. Try to eat foods which resemble their original source as much as possible. Be suspicious about foods wrapped in lots of plastic and which have ingredient lists a mile long.
    • Carbohydrates are vital for energy. Two different forms of carbohydrate are important but one more so than the other. Simple carbohydrates are in sugar, cakes and biscuits, the foods you may crave when you are pregnant. Think of what’s inside the glass cabinet at the corner bakery and you’ll have some good understanding. More complex carbohydrates are on the racks at the back, especially the whole grain breads and rolls. Brown rice, wholegrain flour, wholemeal pasta and potatoes are also quality sources of carbohydrates and are good to prevent constipation.
    • If you are vegetarian or vegan, think about consulting with a dietician to ensure you are getting adequate, first class nutrition during your pregnancy. You need to ensure you are getting enough iron and vitamin B12 in particular, which are vital so you do not become anaemic. You will also need to ensure your protein and calcium intakes are adequate.

    How to maximise the nutrients in your diet

    • Follow the guidelines above to ensure you are eating sufficient quantities of each nutrient per day.
    • Think about taking your own lunch to work. Although it takes a little planning, home prepared foods tend to be more healthy than take-away. Avoid bringing too many convenience foods into the house and make lists before you go grocery shopping. Think about how important your pregnancy nutrition is, not only for your own health but for your developing baby as well.
    • When you prepare fruits and vegetables for eating, aim to peel and chop them immediately before you place them in your mouth. Vitamins can be oxidised and lost into the air as soon as their protective skins are removed. Buy fresh, from large, busy shops where the turn over of stock is likely to be quicker with less storage time.
    • Remember, to reach for the fresher produce which is generally placed at the back of the rows. Heavier fruits and vegetables usually contain more juice and taste better.
    • If you’re too busy to shop regularly, consider joining a fruit and vegie co-op where produce is bought directly from the market and family groups join together. Farmer’s markets and ordering on-line are other practical alternatives.
    • Use minimal water for cooking and if you’re particularly keen, you can drink this or use it in soups or stock. Avoid cooking vegetables and fruit for long periods as this leads to excess vitamin destruction.
    • Tinned, frozen, dried and stewed fruits offer reasonable alternatives to fresh fruit if it is not available.
    • Each colour in a vegetable or fruit indicates a different range of nutrients. So aim for a diverse range of colour on your plate. Not only will it look good but will offer you a wide range of antioxidants and nutrients for you and your baby.
    • Avoid taking vitamin/mineral supplements unless they have been prescribed for you. Folic acid is the exception. Many nutrients are not stored by the body and are excreted in urine and faeces.
    • The absorption of zinc can be interfered with by iron, particularly if you are taking supplements. If you have been prescribed iron tablets, try to avoid taking them when you are eating foods rich in zinc. These are meat, bananas, seafood and nuts.


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