Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links
Penmai eMagazine October! | All Issues

User Tag List

Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By sivagamis
  • 1 Post By sumitra

polysistic ovary

Discussions on "polysistic ovary" in "Gynaecology Problems" forum.

  1. #1
    sivagamis is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2012

    polysistic ovary

    my weight is increasing alot in the past 1 year, and i have irregular periods too, do i have polysistic ovary?

    Similar Threads:

    Sponsored Links
    sumitra likes this.

  2. #2
    sumitra's Avatar
    sumitra is offline Registered User
    Ruler's of Penmai
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Blog Entries

    Re: polysistic ovary

    Dear Sivagamis, I think you are mentioning about polycystic ovary. If that is correct please go through the below mentioned information and get cleared about your doubt.

    My sincere request to you is to go to a doctor immediately and get their advice at once.

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common female endocrine disorders.


    Where PCOS is associated with overweight or obesity, successful weight loss is the most effective method of restoring normal ovulation/menstruation, but many women find it very difficult to achieve and sustain significant weight loss. Low-carbohydrate diets and sustained regular exercise may help. Some experts recommend a low GI diet in which a significant part of total carbohydrates are obtained from fruit, vegetables and whole grain sources.Vitamin D deficiency may play some role in the development of the metabolic syndrome,so treatment of any such deficiency is indicated.


    Reducing insulin resistance by improving insulin sensitivity through medications such as metformin, and the newer thiazolidinedione (glitazones), have been an obvious approach and initial studies seemed to show effectiveness. Although metformin is not licensed for use in PCOS, the United Kingdom's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommended in 2004 that women with PCOS and a body mass index above 25 be given metformin when other therapy has failed to produce results.However subsequent reviews in 2008 and 2009 have noted that randomised control trials have in general not shown the promise suggested by the early observational studies.


    Not all women with PCOS have difficulty becoming pregnant. For those who do, anovulation or infrequent ovulation is a common cause. Other factors include changed levels of gonadotropins, hyperandrogenemia and hyperinsulinemia. Like women without PCOS, women with PCOS who are ovulating may be infertile due to other causes, such as tubal blockages due to a history of sexually transmitted diseases.
    For overweight, anovulatory women with PCOS, weight loss and diet adjustments, especially to reduce the intake of simple carbohydrates, are associated with resumption of natural ovulation.
    For those who after weight loss still are anovulatory or for anovulatory lean women, then the ovulation-inducing medications clomiphene citrateand FSH are the principal treatments used to promote ovulation.Previously, the anti-diabetes medication metformin was recommended treatment for anovulation,but it appears less effective than clomiphene.
    For patients who do not respond to clomiphene, diet and lifestyle modification, there are options available including assisted reproductive technology procedures such as controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) injections followed by in vitro fertilisation (IVF).
    Though surgery is not commonly performed, the polycystic ovaries can be treated with a laparoscopic procedure called "ovarian drilling" (puncture of 410 small follicles with electrocautery, laser, or biopsy needles), which often results in either resumption of spontaneous ovulations or ovulations after adjuvant treatment with clomiphene or FSH. (Ovarian wedge resection is no longer used as much due to complications such as adhesions and the presence of frequently effective medications.) There are, however, concerns about the long-term effects of ovarian drilling on ovarian function

    Hirsutism and acne

    When appropriate (e.g. in women of child-bearing age who require contraception), a standard contraceptive pill is frequently effective in reducing hirsutism. A common choice of contraceptive pill is one that contains cyproterone acetate; in the UK the available brands are Dianette/Diane. Cyproterone acetate is a progestogen with anti-androgen effects that block the action of male hormones that are believed to contribute to acne and the growth of unwanted facial and body hair.On the other hand, progestogens such as norgestrel and levonorgestrel should be avoided due to their androgenic effects.
    Other drugs with anti-androgen effects include flutamideand spironolactone,which can give some improvement in hirsutism. Spironolactone is probably the most-commonly used drug in the US. Metformin can reduce hirsutism, perhaps by reducing insulin resistance, and is often used if there are other features such as insulin resistance, diabetes or obesity that should also benefit from metformin. Eflornithine (Vaniqa) is a drug which is applied to the skin in cream form, and acts directly on the hair follicles to inhibit hair growth. It is usually applied to the face. Medications that reduce acne by indirect hormonal effects also include ergot dopamine agonists such as bromocriptine. 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (such as finasteride and dutasteride) may also be used; they work by blocking the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (the latter of which is responsible for most hair growth alterations and androgenic acne).
    Although these agents have shown significant efficacy in clinical trials (for oral contraceptives, in 60100% of individuals), the reduction in hair growth may not be enough to eliminate the social embarrassment of hirsutism, or the inconvenience of plucking or shaving. Individuals vary in their response to different therapies. It is usually worth trying other drug treatments if one does not work, but drug treatments do not work well for all individuals. For removal of facial hairs, electrolysis or laser treatments are at least for some faster and more efficient alternatives than the above mentioned medical therapies.
    Menstrual irregularity and endometrial hyperplasia

    If fertility is not the primary aim, then menstruation can usually be regulated with a contraceptive pill.The purpose of regulating menstruation is essentially for the woman's convenience, and perhaps her sense of well-being; there is no medical requirement for regular periods, so long as they occur sufficiently often (see below).
    If a regular menstrual cycle is not desired, then therapy for an irregular cycle is not necessarily required most experts consider that if a menstrual bleed occurs at least every three months, then the endometrium (womb lining) is being shed sufficiently often to prevent an increased risk of endometrial abnormalities or cancer.If menstruation occurs less often or not at all, some form of progestogen replacement is recommended. Some women prefer a uterine progestogen device such as the intrauterine system (Mirena) or the progestin implant (Nexplanon), which provides simultaneous contraception and endometrial protection for years.[An alternative is oral progestogen taken at intervals (e.g. every three months) to induce a predictable menstrual bleeding.

    Mals likes this.

  3. #3
    Mals's Avatar
    Mals is offline Guru's of Penmai
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Navi Mumbai



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Like It?
Share It!

Follow Penmai on Twitter