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    Hair Spa Products

    There is nothing like hair spa, to help you to restore the shine and texture of your beautiful hair. While indulging in hair spa, the right kinds of hair spa products need to be used so as to gain the right effect of hair spa.

    • Hair reconstructor
    Hair reconstructor repairs hair, coats hair with keratin, renews hair and gives it a shiny, flexible look. It heals, repairs, moisturizes, protects damaged hair, eliminates frizzy hair, reduces hair volume and can be used on all types of hair. It eliminates frizzy hair, leaving it straight, healthy and shiny for up to three months.

    • Hair Cream
    It helps in retaining the elasticity of the hair. It repairs damaged hair. It nourishes damage hair, makes hair glossy and improves the elasticity. Hair cream is suitable for the extremely dry, damaged, dyed and permed hair. It prevents hair from splitting, breaking and recovers its vitality. Hair cream acts as a moisturizer for the hair and hence plays a vital role in hair spa treatment.

    • Hair Shampoo
    It is very essential in a hair spa treatment as it helps in keeping the hair clean and healthy. Hair shampoo needs to be chosen based on the hair type, texture, volume, etc. there are a variety of shampoos available in the market, one should choose the right shampoo that will suit ones hair. Similarly attention needs to be paid on the quality of the product as low quality products can cause irreparable damage to the hair during hair spa treatment.

    • Hair Oil
    There are numerous oils available for hair massage. Olive oil, coconut oil, almond oil, etc. are famous. Oils can be mixed and used for oil massage. Hair oils form an essential part of hair spa as it helps in strengthening the hair. Hair oils also add sheen and shine for the hair, they strengthen the root of the hair and prevent hair fall.

    • Wide Tooth Comb
    The right type of comb needs to be used.


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    Doctor's Avatar
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    Re: Hair Spa Products

    Natural spa ingredients


    The enormous wealth of natural eco-systems makes southeast Asia a botanical treasure trove. The medicinal qualities of much of its abundant plant life have, for centuries, formed the backbone of health and beauty therapy throughout this huge and exotic continent. Such is the potency of nature in this part of the world that it has found favour in beauty salons everywhere. Here we list some of the most common natural ingredients used.



    LOTUS The lotus flower has great religious significance in Thai culture. The entire plant is used in both food and medicine, and the blossom is a prevalent motif in Thai decoration as well. Significantly, the lotus is found growing in ditches and ponds all over Thailand, where society and culture revolves around water. The roots, young leaves, flower petals and seeds are eaten in traditional dishes. The leaves and petals are used as cigarette papers and wrappings for food, and the flowers are used in floral decorations and as religious offerings. Even the lotus seed hulls have a use and are used as a medium for growing mushrooms!


    PLUMERIA or FRANGIPANI (Plumeria sp)Found all over Thailand, especially in temples and in Bhuddist monastery gardens, the frangipani tree was once considered taboo in Thai homes due to superstitious associations with its Thai name, lantom, which sounds like ratom, meaning sarrow – so the tree was thought to bring unhappiness. The beautifully sweet, fragrant blossoms are offered to Buddha either in garlands or on a plate, and worn by participants in traditional Thai festivals such as Songkran, or Thai New Year.


    WATER LILY (Nymphaea sp)This delightful aquatic flower is seen growing in ditches and ponds all over the country and is a popular decorative plant in homes and gardens. The blossoms come in white, yellow, and various shades of pink, purple and blue. Thai people eat the stalks raw and cooked, and the whole plant is also used for decorative purposes.


    YLANG-YLANG (Cananga odorata)This exotic Asian flower is sweetly fragrant and produces an essential oil that is used in aromatherapy. It has a powerful, heavy, sensuous scent that is soothing and relaxing. In aromatherapy treatments, the perfume calms tension, lifts negative moods as well as increases sensuality. The flower was traditionally used as a medicinal ingredient in Asia to treat insect bites and inflamed skin, rejuvenate the hair, and ward off fever and infection.


    CHAMPAK (Michelia champaka)One of the Thailand’s many night-blooming flowers whose very powerful, sweet fragrance emerges most strongly after sunset, champak or champee flowers are used as religious offerings or in traditional Thai garlands. Their lovely smell makes them ideal ingredients to perfume rooms and the flowers have medicinal properties that help to reduce body temperature as well as stimulate the heart.


    JASMINE (Jasminum sp)Jasmine flowers have great significance in Thailand and are made into garlands as decorations or offerings at religious ceremonies. Their pure white color and delightfully fragrant aroma make them an ideal token for showing respect to Buddha or to monks. As a cuisine ingredient, the flowers are soaked in water to release a fragrant smell, which is then used to flavor desserts. As a traditional herbal remedy, jasmine was believed to help children with chicken-pox. The crushed flower was mixed with rice water, then put in the bath to reduce the itchiness. It was also made into a drink to help cure the disease.

    FRANGIPANI or PLUMERIA (Plumeria Sp.) is one of the most prolific flowers in tropical Asia. The waxy, aromatic blooms fall constantly from the tree of the same name; consequently, they are commonly used in offerings and ceremonies and to decorate religious icons. The plumeria tree is often planted on grave sites in the region.


    HIBISCUS LEAF (Hibiscus Sp.) is the sole ingredient of a traditional form of shampoo. When they are crushed and boiled in a little water, the leaves’ sap forms a sticky, dark-coloured paste that has cleansing properties. The leaf has also traditionally been used as a cleanser in a variety of skin care preparations.
    HIBISCUS FLOWERS (Hibiscus Sp.) are believed to hold certain supernatural powers which absorb negativity and bad spells. The traditional red, orange, yellow and pink blooms have a sweet nectar. They are used for ornamentation purposes and are often found on religious statues. They are also used as an emollient in skin care.


    TROPICAL GARDENIA (Gardenia jasminoides) is regarded almost as an emblem of the tropics, due to its beautifully strong aroma. In many tropical Asian households, the blooms are put in a bowl of water and displayed in the home where their strong scent permeates into the environment.


    TROPICAL MAGNOLIA or CHAMPAK (Michelia champaca) is renowned for its cooling and healing powers with specific anti-malarial properties. Petite web of elegant white petals excludes a scent as sweet as syrup. Like most of her sisters, it is used in prayer ritual and for bathing.


    PANDANUS LEAF (pandanus amaryllifolius) is a versatile leaf grown in most gardens, apotik hidup (which translates as the ‘healing pharmacy’) in Indonesia. Thanks to its earthy and sweet aroma this practical leaf is a popular base for cakes and is infused into oils for hair and skin care. It is also used in virtually all Balinese offerings to the Gods.


    GINGER (Zingiber officinale) is eaten cooked or infused raw into drinks, as a remedy for stomach aches and menstrual pains. Myth says that ginger is key to assisting man’s endurance in love-making due to the phallic shape of the rhizome! Used externally, ginger is applied to the body to relieve aching muscles and increase blood circulation.


    MINT (Mentha arvensis) is a blood cleansing plant because it is antiseptic and antibacterial. It is most commonly taken as a tea simply by infusing a few leaves in boiling water, in order to help clear the complexion. It is also mixed with a crème bath conditioner and rubbed into the scalp to combat dandruff and stimulate hair follicles for growth.


    LEMON GRASS (Cymbopogon citratus) is a key flavouring in Asian cuisine, resembling lemon rind more closely than the juice. The swollen base of the stem is used, but the whole stalk should be soaked before use. It is eaten to speed up a slow digestive system; its oil is good for calming hot, perspiring feet. Burn the oil for an effective room deodorizer.


    BETEL LEAF (Piper betle) is an astringent leaf, associated with feminine cleanliness: it is used as a sanitary wipe and as a cleanser when added to bath water. The fresh leaves are cooling on a hot body. It makes a bitter tea believed to help ‘dry the vagina’ and purify the blood. Both the nut and the leaf are also chewed for a mild stimulating effect.


    GALANGAL (Alpinia galanga) is a rhizome in the ginger family. It has a complex and earthy taste and a pungency and tang quite unlike common ginger. It is most commonly used in cooking, but its faint aroma of camphor makes it one of the spices used in traditional, warming body scrubs such as the Indonesian boreh.


    CANDLENUT (Aleurites molluccana) cooking across the Asian region. Insluncave, the nut’s soft and oily consistency makes it a wonderful ‘scrub’ ingredient. It also acts as a soap because when rubbed over the skin, it drawsout impurities and, as proof, changes from creamy to dirty in colour.


    CLOVES (Euginia caryophyllus) have analgesic qualities and are traditionally used for pain relief, especially for toothache. They are also antiseptic, increase overall blood circulation and, when chewed, can stop excessive flatulence! Suck a clove when you are tired ore stressed or want to give up smoking.


    TURMERIC (Curcuma domestica) is a basic item in folk medicine in tropical Asia. It is used internally and externally for its astringent and cleansing properties and is a core ingredient for jamu herbal tonics in Indonesia. Its vivid colour gives the Javanese lulur (body scrub) its signature orange hue.


    PAPAYA (Carica papaya), abundant throughout tropical Asia, contains vitamins (particularly high in A and C) that heal upset stomachs. It contains enzymes which give it mild exfoliating properties, so Asian women daub papaya around their eyes to eradicate fine lines. Alternatively, papaya skins can be rubbed over the face to remove dead skin cells.


    COCONUT (Cocos nucifera) is used in countless ways: for eating, drinking , as an ingredient in cakes and as tropical Asia’s most prevalent cooking oil. Oil from mature fruit is massaged into the head for soft and shiny hair while the thick white milk is traditionally used as a shampoo and the young, thin milk as a conditioning rinse.


    RICE is not just a food, it is a culture and way of life. Paddies dominate the Indonesian Japanese where 8,000 varieties are believed


  3. #3
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    Re: Hair Spa Products

    Natural spa ingredients


    The enormous wealth of natural eco-systems makes southeast Asia a botanical treasure trove. The medicinal qualities of much of its abundant plant life have, for centuries, formed the backbone of health and beauty therapy throughout this huge and exotic continent. Such is the potency of nature in this part of the world that it has found favour in beauty salons everywhere. Here we list some of the most common natural ingredients used.



    LOTUS The lotus flower has great religious significance in Thai culture. The entire plant is used in both food and medicine, and the blossom is a prevalent motif in Thai decoration as well. Significantly, the lotus is found growing in ditches and ponds all over Thailand, where society and culture revolves around water. The roots, young leaves, flower petals and seeds are eaten in traditional dishes. The leaves and petals are used as cigarette papers and wrappings for food, and the flowers are used in floral decorations and as religious offerings. Even the lotus seed hulls have a use and are used as a medium for growing mushrooms!


    PLUMERIA or FRANGIPANI (Plumeria sp)Found all over Thailand, especially in temples and in Bhuddist monastery gardens, the frangipani tree was once considered taboo in Thai homes due to superstitious associations with its Thai name, lantom, which sounds like ratom, meaning sarrow – so the tree was thought to bring unhappiness. The beautifully sweet, fragrant blossoms are offered to Buddha either in garlands or on a plate, and worn by participants in traditional Thai festivals such as Songkran, or Thai New Year.


    WATER LILY (Nymphaea sp)This delightful aquatic flower is seen growing in ditches and ponds all over the country and is a popular decorative plant in homes and gardens. The blossoms come in white, yellow, and various shades of pink, purple and blue. Thai people eat the stalks raw and cooked, and the whole plant is also used for decorative purposes.


    YLANG-YLANG (Cananga odorata)This exotic Asian flower is sweetly fragrant and produces an essential oil that is used in aromatherapy. It has a powerful, heavy, sensuous scent that is soothing and relaxing. In aromatherapy treatments, the perfume calms tension, lifts negative moods as well as increases sensuality. The flower was traditionally used as a medicinal ingredient in Asia to treat insect bites and inflamed skin, rejuvenate the hair, and ward off fever and infection.


    CHAMPAK (Michelia champaka)One of the Thailand’s many night-blooming flowers whose very powerful, sweet fragrance emerges most strongly after sunset, champak or champee flowers are used as religious offerings or in traditional Thai garlands. Their lovely smell makes them ideal ingredients to perfume rooms and the flowers have medicinal properties that help to reduce body temperature as well as stimulate the heart.


    JASMINE (Jasminum sp)Jasmine flowers have great significance in Thailand and are made into garlands as decorations or offerings at religious ceremonies. Their pure white color and delightfully fragrant aroma make them an ideal token for showing respect to Buddha or to monks. As a cuisine ingredient, the flowers are soaked in water to release a fragrant smell, which is then used to flavor desserts. As a traditional herbal remedy, jasmine was believed to help children with chicken-pox. The crushed flower was mixed with rice water, then put in the bath to reduce the itchiness. It was also made into a drink to help cure the disease.

    FRANGIPANI or PLUMERIA (Plumeria Sp.) is one of the most prolific flowers in tropical Asia. The waxy, aromatic blooms fall constantly from the tree of the same name; consequently, they are commonly used in offerings and ceremonies and to decorate religious icons. The plumeria tree is often planted on grave sites in the region.


    HIBISCUS LEAF (Hibiscus Sp.) is the sole ingredient of a traditional form of shampoo. When they are crushed and boiled in a little water, the leaves’ sap forms a sticky, dark-coloured paste that has cleansing properties. The leaf has also traditionally been used as a cleanser in a variety of skin care preparations.
    HIBISCUS FLOWERS (Hibiscus Sp.) are believed to hold certain supernatural powers which absorb negativity and bad spells. The traditional red, orange, yellow and pink blooms have a sweet nectar. They are used for ornamentation purposes and are often found on religious statues. They are also used as an emollient in skin care.


    TROPICAL GARDENIA (Gardenia jasminoides) is regarded almost as an emblem of the tropics, due to its beautifully strong aroma. In many tropical Asian households, the blooms are put in a bowl of water and displayed in the home where their strong scent permeates into the environment.


    TROPICAL MAGNOLIA or CHAMPAK (Michelia champaca) is renowned for its cooling and healing powers with specific anti-malarial properties. Petite web of elegant white petals excludes a scent as sweet as syrup. Like most of her sisters, it is used in prayer ritual and for bathing.


    PANDANUS LEAF (pandanus amaryllifolius) is a versatile leaf grown in most gardens, apotik hidup (which translates as the ‘healing pharmacy’) in Indonesia. Thanks to its earthy and sweet aroma this practical leaf is a popular base for cakes and is infused into oils for hair and skin care. It is also used in virtually all Balinese offerings to the Gods.


    GINGER (Zingiber officinale) is eaten cooked or infused raw into drinks, as a remedy for stomach aches and menstrual pains. Myth says that ginger is key to assisting man’s endurance in love-making due to the phallic shape of the rhizome! Used externally, ginger is applied to the body to relieve aching muscles and increase blood circulation.


    MINT (Mentha arvensis) is a blood cleansing plant because it is antiseptic and antibacterial. It is most commonly taken as a tea simply by infusing a few leaves in boiling water, in order to help clear the complexion. It is also mixed with a crème bath conditioner and rubbed into the scalp to combat dandruff and stimulate hair follicles for growth.


    LEMON GRASS (Cymbopogon citratus) is a key flavouring in Asian cuisine, resembling lemon rind more closely than the juice. The swollen base of the stem is used, but the whole stalk should be soaked before use. It is eaten to speed up a slow digestive system; its oil is good for calming hot, perspiring feet. Burn the oil for an effective room deodorizer.


    BETEL LEAF (Piper betle) is an astringent leaf, associated with feminine cleanliness: it is used as a sanitary wipe and as a cleanser when added to bath water. The fresh leaves are cooling on a hot body. It makes a bitter tea believed to help ‘dry the vagina’ and purify the blood. Both the nut and the leaf are also chewed for a mild stimulating effect.


    GALANGAL (Alpinia galanga) is a rhizome in the ginger family. It has a complex and earthy taste and a pungency and tang quite unlike common ginger. It is most commonly used in cooking, but its faint aroma of camphor makes it one of the spices used in traditional, warming body scrubs such as the Indonesian boreh.


    CANDLENUT (Aleurites molluccana) cooking across the Asian region. Insluncave, the nut’s soft and oily consistency makes it a wonderful ‘scrub’ ingredient. It also acts as a soap because when rubbed over the skin, it drawsout impurities and, as proof, changes from creamy to dirty in colour.


    CLOVES (Euginia caryophyllus) have analgesic qualities and are traditionally used for pain relief, especially for toothache. They are also antiseptic, increase overall blood circulation and, when chewed, can stop excessive flatulence! Suck a clove when you are tired ore stressed or want to give up smoking.


    TURMERIC (Curcuma domestica) is a basic item in folk medicine in tropical Asia. It is used internally and externally for its astringent and cleansing properties and is a core ingredient for jamu herbal tonics in Indonesia. Its vivid colour gives the Javanese lulur (body scrub) its signature orange hue.


    PAPAYA (Carica papaya), abundant throughout tropical Asia, contains vitamins (particularly high in A and C) that heal upset stomachs. It contains enzymes which give it mild exfoliating properties, so Asian women daub papaya around their eyes to eradicate fine lines. Alternatively, papaya skins can be rubbed over the face to remove dead skin cells.


    COCONUT (Cocos nucifera) is used in countless ways: for eating, drinking , as an ingredient in cakes and as tropical Asia’s most prevalent cooking oil. Oil from mature fruit is massaged into the head for soft and shiny hair while the thick white milk is traditionally used as a shampoo and the young, thin milk as a conditioning rinse.


    RICE is not just a food, it is a culture and way of life. Paddies dominate the Indonesian Japanese where 8,000 varieties are believed


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