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Health Bulletin


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  1. #101
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Interesting viji...............


    Quote Originally Posted by vijigermany View Post
    Low-dose aspirin helps slow breast cancer growth

    A new study by scientists including one of an Indian origin has found that aspirin slowed the growth of breast cancer cell lines in the lab and significantly reduced the growth of tumors in mice.

    The age-old headache remedy also exhibits the ability to prevent tumor cells from spreading.

    Results of the study by researchers at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Kansas City, Mo., and the University of Kansas Medical Center, suggested that regular use of low-dose aspirin might prevent the progression of breast cancer in humans.

    Anecdotal evidence indicated that breast cancer was less likely to return in women who took aspirin to lower their risk of heart attack or stroke. But the science behind this relationship is not well understood.

    The VA study found that aspirin might interfere with cancer cells` ability to find an aggressive, more primordial state. In the mouse model the researchers used, cancer cells treated with aspirin formed no or only partial stem cells, which are believed to fuel the growth and spread of tumors.

    Senior author Sushanta Banerjee, director of the cancer research unit and a professor at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan, said that first-line chemotherapy treatments do not destroy stem cells.

    Eventually, the tumor will grow again. "If you don`t target the stemness, it is known you will not get any effect. It will relapse," said Banerjee, a professor of medicine in division of hematology and oncology.

    In lab tests, aspirin blocked the proliferation of two different breast cancer lines. One of the lines tested is often called triple-negative breast cancer, a less common but more difficult treat form of the disease. "We are mainly interested in triple negative breast cancer, because the prognosis is very poor," Banerjee stated.

    Triple-negative breast cancers, which will be addressed in a special thematic program at the ASBMB annual meeting, lack receptors for estrogen, progesterone and Her2. Aspirin also may improve the effectiveness of current treatments for women whose breast cancers are hormone-receptor positive.

    In the team`s study, aspirin enhanced the effect of tamoxifen, the usual drug therapy for hormone-receptor positive breast cancer.

    Aspirin is used in the treatment of a number of different conditions. Banerjee said its ability to attack multiple metabolic pathways is what makes it potentially useful in the fight against cancer.

    Aspirin is a medicine with side effects, including gastrointestinal bleeding. Researchers will continue to explore if the positive effects of regular use of the drug outweigh the risks.

    The lead author of the study, Gargi Maity, a postdoctoral fellow who works in the cancer research unit at the VA Medical Center, presented the team`s findings at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, which is being held in conjunction with the Experimental Biology 2013 conference in Boston.



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  2. #102
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    hi sree,
    thanks


  3. #103
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Video game can help cure ‘lazy eye’ in adults

    Researchers have found that a popular puzzle video game could help improve vision in adult amblyopia, commonly known as 'lazy eye'.

    A research team led by Dr Robert Hess from McGill University and the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre in Canada examined the potential of treating amblyopic adults using the video game Tetris, which involves connecting different shaped blocks as they fall to the ground.

    They found that by distributing information between the two eyes in a complementary fashion, the video game trains both eyes to work together , which is counter to previous treatments for the disorder.

    This provides direct evidence that alleviating suppression of the weaker eye, by forcing both eyes to cooperate , increases the level of plasticity in the brain and allows the amblyopic brain to relearn , researchers said.

    Amblyopia is caused by poor processing in the brain, which results in suppression of the weaker eye by the stronger eye. Previous treatments for the disorder, which have focused largely on covering the stronger eye in order to force the weaker eye to work, have proven only partially successful in children and have been ineffective in adults.

    "The key to improving vision for adults, who currently have no other treatment options, was to set up conditions that would enable the two eyes to cooperate for the first time in a given task," said Hess, senior author of the paper.


  4. #104
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Indian hip fracture patients at high mortality risk

    An Indian study has found that 30.4 per cent of hip fracture patients died within one year, with the majority of deaths occurring within the first six months after fracture, and survivors had high rates of functional impairment.

    In various studies across different countries the reported one year mortality risks after hip fracture can vary anywhere from 5 to 50 per cent. In India, however, there has been little research on the risk of mortality and functional impairment following hip fracture.

    In an oral presentation held during the European Congress on Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis in Rome, Italy, held from April 17 to 20 in Rome, Italy, researchers from Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India presented findings from a prospective study which found that patients had a high rate of one-year mortality and functional impairment.

    The study included 188 patients (mean age 64.67, 60 per cent women) with fragility hip fracture admitted to the hospital over a three and half-year period.

    The follow up on 174 of these patients showed that 30.4 per cent had died within one year, with the majority of deaths occurring within the first six months after fracture.

    Only around one-fifth of the patients were able to return to normal motor function. The remaining needed assistance for their daily life activities: 13.7 per cent were bed ridden, 14.9 per cent could only walk with a cane, and 19.5 per cent required a walker (zimmer frame).

    The findings have been published in `Osteoporosis International.`


  5. #105
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Docs warn against 'cinnamon challenge' trend

    challenge` trend (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images)
    American Doctors have warned that the famous `Cinnamon Challenge`, which involves swallowing a teaspoon of cinnamon in one go, could be more harmful than fun.


    The `Cinnamon Dare`, which has been attempted by many youngsters on Youtube, involves trying to swallow one teaspoon of cinnamon without water, often while being filmed, Sky News reported.

    But a report has revealed that 30 US teenagers had to undergo medical treatment after ingesting the spice last year.

    The report also claimed that cinnamon, which is made from tree bark, can cause scarring in the lungs.

    Other symptoms can include choking, throat irritation, respiratory trouble and collapsed lungs.

    There is no suggestion eating cinnamon in small quantities is harmful.


  6. #106
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Eating chocolate may trigger acne, say scientists

    Chocolate may increase inflammation that aggravates acne, a new small-scale study has found.

    Researchers at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center in the Netherlands, collected blood samples from participants before and after they ate 48 g of chocolate, each day for four days. The chocolate contained about 30 per cent cocoa.

    They then exposed the blood cells to bacteria called Propionibacterium acnes, which contribute to acne when they grow inside clogged pores and cause pores to become inflamed, and to Staphylococcus aureus, another skin bacteria that can aggravate acne.

    After eating chocolate, the seven participants' blood cells produced more interleukin-1b, a marker of immune system inflammation, when exposed to Propionibacterium acnes. This suggests chocolate consumption could increase the inflammation that contributes to acne, the researchers said.
    In addition, eating chocolate increased production of another immune system factor called interleukin 10 after exposure to Staphylococcus aureus, MyHealthNewsDaily reported.

    Interleukin 10 is thought to lower human bodies' defenses against microorganisms, and thus, higher levels of interleukin 10 could create conditions that allow bacteria to infect pimples, and worsen them, the researchers said.

    Although there's a lot of talk about chocolate and other foods playing a role in acne, there's very little evidence to show they do, said Dr Kanade Shinkai, a dermatologist at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, who specialises in acne treatments.

    There is some evidence that so-called high glycemic foods, such as white bread, which release sugar very quickly into the bloodstream, may be linked to acne, Shinkai said. While there may be a subset of people whose acne is influenced by diet, this is probably not true for everyone, Shinkai was quoted as saying by the website.

    Shinkai cautioned against broad dietary restrictions, such as avoiding dairy, because dairy products are important sources of calcium and vitamin D for many people, and the nutritional benefits of the products outweigh the impact of acne, she said.

    The new study was published in the journal Cytokine.


  7. #107
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    A spoon of beer enough to make you happy

    Just a spoon of beer may trigger the happy hormone, says a research. But how exactly do alcohols react with your body?

    We all knew drinking makes us feel 'happy', but just the taste of it? A study conducted by neurologists at the University of Indiana, reveals that sipping a spoon of beer is enough to trigger the release of the happy hormone dopamine in the brain.

    The researchers got 49 men to take small sips of beer every 15 minutes, while their brains were scanned for dopamine. The men, averaging 25 years in age, showed a rise in their dopamine levels on having only a spoonful of beer. The most striking aspect of the finding, researchers say, is how the taste of beer alone, without its intoxicating effect, can elicit a dopamine response. While the scientists have tested only beer, the study prompts us to take a look at how alcohol reacts with our bodies, and whether different alcohols work differently in our systems.

    True lies
    Over time, every alcohol has earned its dubious reputation. Gin is accused of making us mean, vodka is blamed for reckless behaviour, tequila is associated with rowdiness and rum is said to mellow us down. These general perceptions, if you ask scientists, are totally unfounded. Studies have established that almost all alcohol is essentially ethyl alcohol, and such perceptions of experiencing 'different highs' from different alcohols are mostly psychological; driven by mood, memories, surroundings and other factors.

    Percentage matters
    One reason why different alcohols react differently in your body is the percentage of alcohol your choice of drink has. While beer has around four per cent ABV (Alcohol By Volume), whiskey, rum, gin and vodka are usually ten times stronger, hovering at around 40 per cent ABV. It's a no-brainer then that if two people were to have the same amounts of whiskey and beer, the dude chugging whiskey would get knocked out faster.

    Apart from the speed at which you down your drink, what also matters is how you drink it. Since alcohol is a simple molecule that's rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream, vodka shots or tequila shots will shoot up your blood alcohol level faster, getting you high in no time.

    Body talk
    Once alcohol leaves your mouth, it takes only three minutes for it to reach your brain. While 20 per cent of it is instantly absorbed into the bloodstream through the stomach walls, the remaining 80 per cent is processed slowly through the small intestine and into the bloodstream. As a natural mechanism, your body constantly tries to flush out alcohol from the system. The heart pumps the alcohol-heavy blood through the body till it sends the alcohol to the liver, which breaks it down. The liver, in fact, oxidises more than 90 per cent of it into water and carbon dioxide. The rest is excreted through breath, urine and saliva.

    Again, since ABV is the critical factor, your system absorbs vodka faster than it would absorb beer.

    Fizzy does it
    Alcohol enters your blood stream faster when it's mixed with a cola or an energy drink. This happens mostly because the fizz causes some distention in your stomach, which in turn speeds up the alcohol's movement from the stomach into the small intestine, where alcohol is taken in more rapidly. The booze, therefore, ends up entering the blood stream faster.

    What you mix with your drink also determines its potency because alcohol is a depressant and a sedative, whereas sugary energy drinks and colas are packed with caffeine, making the combination more of a stimulant.

    Science wise
    Alcohol irritates the stomach lining more if you have it on an empty stomach. So before knocking back a few drinks, have a glass of milk or a quick meal that contains some fat. Studies say that since fat digests slowly, it protects your stomach and slows the rate at which alcohol rushes into your system. As for dehydration, a simple rule can offset it: one glass of water for every glass of alcohol.


  8. #108
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Found: Genes that delay pregnancy

    Researchers, led by an Indian-origin scientist, have identified genes which help female mice and some other mammals delay the onset of pregnancy. Unlike in humans, the remarkable ability, known as embryonic diapause, is a temporary state of suspended animation that occurs when environmental conditions are not favourable to the survival of the mother and the newborn.

    A new study, published in the journal Open Biology, reveals the molecular mechanism responsible for pausing and resuming a pregnancy. After an egg is fertilized, it forms a cluster of cells known as a blastocyst, which implants in the wall of the mother's uterus, 'LiveScience' reported.

    However, in diapause, the blastocyst is prevented from implanting and preserved in an dormant state until pregnancy resumes. How this process occurred was a mystery till now.

    Researcher Sudhansu Dey, from Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation, and colleagues were studying the process of embryo implantation in mice when they noticed that a gene called MSX1 was very active just before implantation. They began to suspect that it might play a role in diapause, Dey said.

    Researchers used hormones to induce pregnancy delays in mice, mink and Tammar wallabies to investigate further. During this delayed state, Dey's team measured how active the MSX1 gene and other related genes were in generating protein-making instructions. They imaged tissue from the animals to see where the gene was active. Finally, they tested whether these genes were being made into proteins. Researchers found that the MSX genes were more active when pregnancies were delayed, and found this was true for all three animals.

    The results show that MSX genes, which are part of an ancient family of genes, have been preserved over much of evolutionary time, and play an important role in delaying pregnancy under harsh conditions, Dey said. He wants to know whether the same genes may enable delayed pregnancies in other animals and if it could have implications for humans.


  9. #109
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    A 'switch' that can help burn fat identified

    Researchers have decoded a "toggle switch" in mice which can significantly stimulate fat burning and may help combat obesity. Scientists at the University of Bonn working with Alexander Pfeifer have spent years using animal models to explore how the undesirable white fat can be converted into sought-after brown fat. "In this way, excess pounds may be able to simply be melted away and obesity combated," said Pfeifer. The researchers have now decoded a "microRNA switch" in mice which is important for brown fat cells. Micro-RNAs are located in the genome of cells and very quickly and efficiently regulate gene activity.


  10. #110
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    How you sneeze may hold clues to your personality

    Are you a snorter or a squeaker? The way you sneeze can reveal a lot about your personality, a new US study suggests. The way we sneeze reflects certain components of our personality, said Dr Alan Hirsch, a neurologist, psychiatrist and founder of the Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago.

    According to Hirsch, "Sneezes are like laughter. Some (laughs) are loud, some are soft. And its similar with sneezing. It will often be the same from youth onward in terms of what it sounds like."

    He added, "It's more of a psychological thing and represents the underlying personality or character structure," he said.

    A person who is demonstrative and outgoing, for instance, would most likely have a loud explosive sneeze, whereas someone who's shy might try to withhold their sneezes, resulting in more of a Minnie Mouse-type expulsion. "In general, sneezing is an involuntary phenomenon, part of the body's mechanism of defence, a way of clearing out bacteria or other agents that would be injurious," said Dr Gordon Siegel, a Chicago otolaryngologist. "That being said, you can control to a degree the way it comes out," he said.

    Siegel said the shape of our nose or the bone structure of our face might contribute a small degree to certain sneezing styles.


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