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Health Bulletin


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  1. #1321
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Watch your waistline for diabetes risk

    A British health report has warned that adults with a large waistline are five times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

    In its report, the Public Health England (PHE), an executive agency of Britain's Department of Health, said they encourage people to monitor their waistline and assess risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    According to the report, men having a large waist circumference of over 102cm (40 inches)are five times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Women with a large waist circumference of over 88cm (34.6 inches) are three times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, Xinhua reported.

    Currently 90 percent of the adults with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, and the prevalence of both obesity and diabetes are on the increase, said PHE experts.

    Being overweight or obese is the main avoidable risk factor for type 2 diabetes, they added.

    According to Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at PHE, type 2 diabetes is a very serious public health issue which can have significant consequences, such as limb amputations or blindness.

    The key to reducing your chances of type 2 diabetes is losing weight which can be achieved through a healthy diet and being more active, she added.
    The report also revealed that deprivation is closely linked to the risk of both -- obesity and diabetes in Britain, with type 2 diabetes being 40 percent more common among people in the poorest communities compared to the rich ones.


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  2. #1322
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Lead in teeth holds secrets of person's origins, research shows

    The lead in human teeth holds clues about where a person grew up and can help criminal investigators and archeologists working with old or decomposed corpses, according to a University of Florida researcher.

    Because lead ore deposits around the world differ, and as young people's teeth absorb traces of the metal in the environment, the region where a person grew up can be distinguished through lead analysis of a tooth, said geologist George Kamenov.

    His study on the topic will appear in the August issue of Science of The Total Environment, a peer-reviewed journal.

    "If you were born in Europe and then came to the US, yes, I will be able to see that," Kamenov said. "I was born in Bulgaria so I have the European ... signal."

    Kamenov said he has worked with law enforcement officers on cold cases, with lead analysis helping investigators narrow their focus.

    In addition to aiding authorities in identifying bodies, the analysis can help archeologists locate human remains on an historical timeline, he said.

    The impact of leaded gasoline used from the 1920s through 1980s is also reflected in the teeth, which can help narrow a body's age, Kamenov said.

    Teeth can reveal whether a person spent formative years in the United States versus Europe, South America, Australia or other broad regions, he said.

    Beyond lead, Kamenov said that analysis of oxygen in bones, which regenerate every seven to 10 years, can pinpoint where a person spent the past decade. Other chemical elements in hair and nails provide information about the person's location over the previous several months, he said.

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  3. #1323
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    nice info
    thanks

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  4. #1324
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Hi 6x,
    most welcome
    wish you a wonderful weed end

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  5. #1325
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Cosmetic eyelid surgery technique may help cure migraine

    Cosmetic eyelid surgery technique could provide significant relief from migraine, scientists say.

    Dr Oren Tessler, from the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, is part of a team of plastic and reconstructive surgeons who report a high success rate using a method to screen and select patients for a specific surgical migraine treatment technique.

    More than 90 per cent of the patients who underwent this surgery to decompress the nerves that trigger migraines experienced relief, researchers claim.

    The study confirms the benefit of surgical treatment for migraines and expands access to it.

    The technique offers an alternative to the commonly used endoscopic approach which works down from the scalp under the skin.

    There are many cases that are not suitable for this approach, ranging from the patient's anatomical issues to some surgeons' lack of access to endoscopes or experience with them, said researchers.

    The research team found that, in a select group of patients, incisions through the upper eyelid resulted in equally effective release and deactivation of the nerves involved in migraines.

    The researchers, who also included surgeons from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, report an overall positive response rate of 90.7 per cent.

    Migraine headaches were totally eliminated in 51.3 per cent of the patients, with about a fifth of them experiencing an 80 per cent reduction of symptoms.

    Nearly a third of the patients had between 50 and 80 per cent of their symptoms resolved.

    Thirty-five patients participated in the study. All suffered from chronic nerve compression migraine headaches confirmed by previous positive response to Botox or nerve block treatments.

    Migraine headaches can cause significant pain in one area of the head, often accompanied by nausea, and sensitivity to light and sounds.

    The study was published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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  6. #1326
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Pouring emotion helps breast cancer survivors

    Writing down fears, emotions and benefits of a cancer diagnosis may improve health outcomes for Asian-American breast cancer survivors, a research reveals.

    "The key to developing an expressive writing intervention is the writing instruction. Otherwise, writing is just like a journal recording facts and events," said Qian Lu, assistant professor and director of the culture and health research centre at University of Houston (UH).In her research, Lu found some of the challenges with the Asian-American breast cancer survivors were feeling stigmatised, shame associated with cancer, cultural beliefs of bearing the burden alone to avoid disrupting harmony and suppressing emotions.

    Lu's research team asked participants to write 20 minutes each week for three weeks.

    Three sealed envelopes were mailed simultaneously to the participants with each envelope containing different writing instructions for the corresponding week.

    The findings suggest participants perceived the writing task to be easy, revealed their emotions, and disclosed their experiences in writing that they had not previously told others.

    "Participants reported that they wrote down whatever they thought and felt and perceived the intervention to be appropriate and valuable," Lu added.
    Previous research has found that writing about emotionally difficult events for just 20 to 30 minutes at a time over three or four days increased the immune function.

    The release offered by writing had a direct impact on the body's capacity to withstand stress and fight off infection and disease.

    "In my research, I found long-term physical and psychological health benefits when research participants wrote about their deepest fears and the benefits of a breast cancer diagnosis," Lu contended.

    The study appeared in the journal Health Psychology.

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  7. #1327
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Chronic pain may make you lethargic

    If you are suffering from chronic pain, it may affect the brain in such a way that it decreases your motivation level even after popping painkillers, says a study.

    People with chronic pain report feeling fatigue, depression and decreased motivation, Neil Schwartz from Stanford University in California was quoted as saying.

    The brain's rewiring during chronic pain may stem from the way pain prevents people from further injury, researchers said.

    "Acute pain is useful because it limits or stops our behaviour to prevent further injury, promote healing and prevent a similar injury in the future," Schwartz added.

    In their study, the researchers gave mice a chocolate-flavoured pellet if they poked their noses into a small hole.
    But it became more difficult over time, requiring dozens of nose pokes for a pellet.

    The injured mice still liked the reward but the pain decreased their motivation, the findings showed.

    Even painkillers failed to improve their performance, researcher noted.
    A signalling chemical called galanin was found to be the link between changes in the brain's circuits and the decreased level of motivation.
    The researchers also found that some of the nerve cells in the nucleus accumbens, an area of the brain associated with pain and motivation, were not responding properly.

    The study appeared in the journal Science.

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  8. #1328
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Scientists create map of eye with vision loss

    Researchers have created an up-to-date detailed molecular map of eye with vision loss disease.

    Researchers from University of Iowa developed a most detailed map to date of the abundance of thousands of proteins in the choroid, a region of the human eye long associated with blinding diseases. By seeing differences in protein abundance, the researchers would begin to figure out which proteins might be the critical actors in vision loss and eye disease.

    Vinit Mahajan, assistant professor in ophthalmology at the UI, said that this molecular map now gives them clues why certain areas of the choroid are more sensitive to certain diseases, as well as where to target therapies and why.

    Jessica Skeie, a post-doctoral researcher in ophthalmology at the UI, said that they were able to identify thousands of proteins simultaneously and develop a map that shows the patterns of proteins that make these regions unique, furthermore this has helped them explain why certain genes are associated with macular degeneration, and helps point them to new treatment targets.

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  9. #1329
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    How probiotics are good for your gut revealed

    Researchers have found that "normal" bacteria plays vital for keeping intestinal lining intact and eating probiotics, which contains the good kind of bacteria, helps in avoiding inflammatory disorders that occur when the intestinal lining has been compromised.

    Sridhar Mani, M.D., said that by adding probiotics in the form of IPA-producing bacteria to the intestine or by administering IPA directly, might be able to prevent or treat IBD and other inflammatory disorders that occur when the intestinal epithelium has been compromised.

    He further added that such a strategy could also be tried for other health problems that may occur when the intestinal epithelium breaks down, including certain forms of liver disease, diabetes, asthma, allergies, obesity and heart disease.

    The research involved the intestinal microbiome, which contains some 100 trillion bacteria. The role of these microorganisms in promoting or preventing disease has been a major emerging field of study. Einstein scientists found that absorption of a specific bacterial byproduct was crucial for maintaining the integrity of the intestinal epithelium, the single-cell layer responsible for keeping intestinal bacteria and their toxins inside the gut and away from the rest of the body. Breaching of the intact intestinal epithelium was associated with a number of diseases.

    Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found in a series of mouse studies that a metabolite called indole 3-propionic acid (IPA), produced exclusively by so-called commensal bacteria, which aid in digestion, both strengthens the intestinal epithelium's barrier function and prevents its inflammation by activating PXR.

    More specifically, PXR activation suppresses production of an inflammatory protein called tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) while increasing levels of a protein that strengthens the junctions between adjacent intestinal epithelial cells.

    The researchers are now developing novel probiotics aimed at restoring the intestinal epithelium's barrier function by encouraging IPA's interaction with PXR.

    The study is published online in the journal Immunity.

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  10. #1330
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Arthritis cases among Indian youngsters rising: Expert

    There has been a rise in the number of young Indians diagnosed with knee arthritis and other problems of joints and ligaments, a health expert said Monday.

    "Arthritis or the damage that sets up in our body joints is considered a problem associated with ageing. Loss of cartilage, depleting calcium, wear and tear of the ligaments, or excessive weight have contributed to the onset of arthritis.

    "However, we are now seeing a rise in the number of younger patients with osteoarthritis, Rajeev K Sharma, senior consultant and orthopaedic and joint replacement surgeon at Apollo Hospital, said here in a press conference on the occasion of the "National Bone and Joint Day" Monday.
    Sharma highlighted on the need to create awareness among young people and having a healthy lifestyle.

    "Obesity, lack of exercise, injury in bones or muscles, hereditary defects in alignment of legs, faulty lifestyle and absence of physical activity lead to early degeneration of muscles and cartilage around the joints," he added.
    According to experts, though the number of young patients with arthritis might be barely 10 percent, it is important to encourage youngsters to walk, cycle and perform regular exercise.


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