Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links
Penmai eMagazine November! | All Issues

User Tag List

Like Tree245Likes

Health Bulletin


Discussions on "Health Bulletin" in "Health" forum.


  1. #1531
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    96,967

    Re: Health Bulletin

    High milk intake tied to early death?

    Drinking more than one and a half pints of milk a day could increase the risk of early death, a new study has warned. Researchers led by professor Karl Michaelsson of Uppsala University in Sweden found that the high levels of lactose and galactose sugar in milk mean the drink in large quantities could have a negative effect.

    The study surveyed 61,000 women and 45,000 men for over 20 years and found that there was no reduction in broken bones for those that drank the most milk. The researchers found those who drank one and a half pints of milk a day were twice as likely to die early than those who drank less. In the study 61,433 women, aged 39 to 74, and 45,339 men, aged 45 to 79, in Sweden completed food frequency questionnaires for 96 common foods including milk, yoghurt and cheese.

    The scientists set out to examine whether high milk intake may increase oxidative stress, which in turn affects the risk of mortality and bone fracture.

    In women, no reduction in fracture risk with higher milk consumption was observed. Women who drank over three glasses/day (average 680ml) had a higher risk of death than women who drank less than one glass of milk a day (average 60ml). Men were tracked for 11 years, during which time 10,112 died and 5,066 had a fracture, with 1,166 hip fracture cases. Men also had a higher risk of death with higher milk consumption, although this was less pronounced than in women.

    Analysis showed a positive association between milk intake and biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation. A high intake of fermented milk products with a low lactose content - including yoghurt and cheese - was associated with reduced rates of mortality and fracture, particularly in women. The researchers concluded that a higher consumption of milk in women and men is not accompanied by a lower risk of fracture and instead may be associated with a higher rate of death.


    Sponsored Links

  2. #1532
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    96,967

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Sad music evokes positive emotions

    Why do people find solace in sad songs? To get over emotional stress and start their life afresh, an interesting study shows.

    German researchers have discovered that sad music can evoke positive emotions like peacefulness and tenderness.

    The biggest reward is that sad songs allow people to feel sadness without any of its "real-life implications", they found.

    "In other words, you can safely explore what it is like to be a little blue without experiencing the intense grief of mourning.

    "Sad music has potential to regulate negative moods and emotions, as well as to provide consolation... In this sense, sad music can play a role in well-being," explained study author Liila Taruffi from Freie Universitat Berlin, Germany.

    For the study, researchers analysed a survey of more than 770 people around the world.

    "Sad music promotes and creates a space for reflection and reappraisal of personal experiences, thoughts and feelings," Taruffi maintained.

    The appreciation of sad music is enhanced after an argument with a loved one or a break-up, the authors said.

    The findings were published in the journal PLOS ONE.


  3. #1533
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    96,967

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Researchers grow 'mini human stomachs' in lab dishes with stem cells

    It might seem shocking to you, but thanks to the scientists, who have now grown miniature stomachs in laboratory using stem cells.

    According to a study published in the journal Nature, researchers have grown stomachs measuring 0.1 inches (3 millimeters) in diameter, in petri dishes.

    Called gastric organoids, the lab-dish tissue comprises buds of cells that are "a miniature version of the stomach", the researchers said.

    The scientists used two different types of stem cells, one derived from early-stage embryos and the other derived from adult human skin cells reprogrammed to their juvenile state, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). Then these were treated with various chemicals which led to construction of gastric tissue that look like stomachs of developing fetuses.

    The study is certainly a breakthrough and paves way for hope to treat ulcers, stomach cancer and perhaps even grow replacement stomachs some day. The researchers believe that organoids can still help in studying about stomach diseases if not replace a 'real' stomach.


  4. #1534
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    96,967

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Government set to allow abortions till 24 weeks

    The Indian government has proposed an increase in the abortion limit from the present 20 weeks to 24 weeks and even beyond in case of fetal abnormality.

    A draft Medical Termination of Pregnancy (Amendment),Bill 2014 was put up on the ministry of health website on October 29.

    The draft says that pregnancies can be terminated up to 24 weeks if there is a risk to the life of the pregnant woman or of injury to her physical or mental health or if there is substantial risk that if the child were born it would suffer from serious physical or mental abnormalities.

    The draft added that if the fetus was diagnosed with substantial abnormalities then pregnancy can be terminated at any stage. " this means the fetus can be terminated even beyond 24 weeks if detected with an abnormality" said Dr Nikhil Datar whose patient Niketa Mehta highlighted the need for a change in the last.


    It may be recalled that in 2008 a Mumbai resident Niketa Mehta had moved the Bombay High Court and the Supreme Court for termination of her 20-plus week pregnancy after diagnostic scans showed that the fetus had abnormal heart.


  5. #1535
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    96,967

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Anti-HIV pill is 90% effective when taken during sex

    A pill which can reduce the risk of HIV infection by up to 90% is most effective when used at the same time as sex, French researchers have said. Trials of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among gay men in the UK were extended earlier this month after the daily pills were shown to provide unprecedented protection to those most at risk of infection.

    Now, in what researchers called a "major breakthrough in the fight against HIV" a separate French trial of PrEP has found that it also led to "a very significant reduction" in the risk of infection amongst men who took it while they had sex.



    If the pill is taken on an on-demand basis, rather than daily, it could come at a significantly lower cost to the health service. Yusef Azad, director of policy and campaigns at the National AIDS Trust, said that the results of the trial, conducted by ANRS, was "another exciting piece of news" adding to a "growing and powerful evidence base on the effectiveness of PrEP".


  6. #1536
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    96,967

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Its official: Scratching does increase itchiness

    A new research has cracked the answers to as why scratching makes one itch more and has observed that scratching causes the brain to release serotonin, which intensifies the itch sensation.

    The study conducted at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, showed that findings in mice are same vicious cycle of itching and scratching is thought to occur in humans.

    Zhou-Feng Chen, PhD, director of Washington University's Center for the Study of Itch, said that the problem was that when the brain geot those pain signals, it responded by producing the neurotransmitter serotonin to help control that pain but as serotonin spreads from the brain into the spinal cord, they found the chemical could "jump the tracks" moving from pain-sensing neurons to nerve cells that influenced itch intensity.

    The researchers bred a strain of mice that lacked the genes to make serotonin. When those genetically engineered mice were injected with a substance that normally makes the skin itch, the mice didn't scratch as much as their normal littermates but when the genetically altered mice were injected with serotonin, they scratched as mice would be expected to in response to compounds designed to induce itching.

    Chen said that they always have wondered why this vicious itch-pain cycle occurs. Their findings suggest that the events happen in this order. First, one scratch, and that causes a sensation of pain then one make more serotonin to control the pain but serotonin does more than only inhibit pain.

    The study is published in the journal Neuron.


  7. #1537
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    96,967

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Why sadness lasts 240 times longer than other emotions

    A new study has revealed that because sadness often goes hand in hand with events of greater impact such as death or accidents, it lasts 240 times longer than any other emotion.

    According to the study, emotions that last a shorter time are typically elicited by events that have relatively low importance attached to them. On the other hand, long-lasting emotions tend to be caused by events that have strong implications for a person's major concerns.

    Researchers Philippe Verduyn and Saskia Lavrijsen of the University of Leuven in Belgium asked 233 high school students to recollect recent emotional episodes and report their duration. The participants also had to answer questions about the strategies they use to appraise and deal with these emotions.

    Meaningful differences in duration were indeed found to exist between emotions. Out of a set of 27 emotions, sadness lasted the longest, whereas shame, surprise, fear, disgust, boredom, being touched, irritated or feeling relief were often over in a flash. Interestingly enough, boredom also counts among the shorter emotions experienced. Verduyn and Lavrijsen say that this means that even though time seems to pass slowly when one is bored, an episode of boredom typically doesn't last that long.

    It was also found that guilt is an emotion that persists much longer than shame, while anxiety lingers longer than fear.

    Verduyn said that some of these implications may only become apparent over time, which then causes the emotion to be maintained or strengthened. The feeling therefore endures while a person rethinks the events and consequences over and over again.

    The study was published in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion.


  8. #1538
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    96,967

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Breast cancer emerging epidemic proportions in India, say experts

    Anuradha, a bubbly, creative writer-journalist with a very liberal outlook, took breast cancer head-on, after she was diagnosed with the killer-disease in 1998.

    In July this year, she accepted defeat and disappeared into time-wrap. But during the 16 years of her fight against the disease, Anuradha helped the medical fraternity in spreading awareness among women as also to overcome the psychological trauma of cancer affected.

    Breast cancer is developing into epidemic proportions in India, and it is now the leading cause of cancer death in Indian women. Roughly 1.5 lakh new cases are being diagnosed every year and close to 70,000 women die of breast cancer, according to Globocan (WHO) Data 2012.

    To raise general awareness about breast cancer, the Kochi-based Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences (AIMS) recently organised a national seminar on 'Practical issues in the management of breast cancer'.

    The seminar, inaugurated by Dr. Santosh John Abraham, President of the Association of Surgeons of India, was attended by leading oncologists from across the state and some international experts.

    "Public awareness, community screening for early detection are essential interventions to save a lot of lives before the disease takes epidemic proportions," said Dr. Prem Nair, Medical Director of Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences.

    "The preliminary data from our own screening programme has been very encouraging," he added.

    On its part, AIMS had announced free breast screening mammogram for 100 women above the age of 50. The institute has a unique breast cancer screening clinic, for early detection and treatment. Since its inception early 2014, the Clinic has screened more than 1,000 women.

    "AIMS has an advanced facility to screen breast cancer - Sentinel Lymph node Biopsy, a procedure based on newer molecular classification based on Immunohistochemical markers," said Dr. K. Pavithran, head of Medical Oncology department.

    "The day-care chemotherapy unit has two state-of-the-art Laminar flow systems to ensure safe mixing and dilution of chemotherapy drugs and 36 reclining chemotherapy delivery chairs to ensure comfort to the patient," Dr.Pavithran added.

    The surgical oncology team at AIMS is also studying newer techniques to reduce Lymphedema, which is a common morbidity factor for Breast Cancer Surgery, said Dr. Pavithran.


  9. #1539
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    96,967

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Insomnia triples risk of motor accident deaths

    Developing a healthy sleeping habit could be a life saviour as researchers have found that insomnia significantly increases risk of death caused by motor vehicle crashes and other unintentional fatal injuries.

    People with all symptoms of insomnia were 2.8 times more likely to die from a fatal injury than those with no insomnia symptoms, even after adjusting for potential confounders such as alcohol consumption and daily use of sleep medication.

    "Our results suggest that a large proportion of unintentional fatal injuries and fatal motor vehicle injuries could have been prevented in the absence of insomnia," said lead author Lars Laugsand from Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim.

    Risk of unintentional fatal injury increases in a dose-dependent manner with the number of insomnia symptoms present, the findings showed.

    Among the insomnia symptoms, difficulty falling asleep appeared to have the strongest and most robust association with fatal injuries.

    People who almost always had difficulty falling asleep were more than two times more likely to die from a motor vehicle injury and over 1.5 times more likely to die from any fatal injury than people who never had trouble initiating sleep, the findings showed.

    Further analysis found that self-reported difficulty in falling asleep contributed to 34 percent of motor vehicle deaths and eight percent of all unintentional fatal injuries, which could have been prevented in the absence of insomnia.

    "Increasing public health awareness about insomnia and identifying and treating people with insomnia may be important in preventing unintentional fatal injuries," Laugsand added.

    The study involved analysis of population-based survey data from 54,399 men and women between 20 and 89 years of age.

    The study appeared in the journal Sleep.


  10. #1540
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    96,967

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Can drinking water put your heart at risk?

    Ana Navas-Acien can't quite recall the moment when she began to worry about arsenic in drinking water and its potential role in heart disease. Perhaps it was when she read a study suggesting a link among people in Bangladesh.

    Several years ago, Dr Navas-Acien of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, decided to see if similar links could be found in the US. She found an ideal group — a stable population relying mainly on private well water — in a study of Native Americans. As it turned out, Native Americans also were worried about arsenic in their well water.

    Although the Environmental Protection Agency sets a 10 parts-perbillion safety standard for drinking water, only municipal water utilities are required to meet it. In private wells, arsenic has been measured in much higher levels. As levels of arsenic rose in individuals, she found, so did the incidences of atherosclerosis, of stroke, of heart attack. For those with chronic exposure to arsenic, rates of cardiovascular illness were doubled.

    "On the question of whether arsenic is a cardiovascular risk, I'd say yes," Navas-Acien said. This is supported by researchers and clinical cardiologists who worry that environmental exposures are often an underestimated risk in heart disease. The most troubling are thought to be air pollution, metallic elements like arsenic, and heavy metals such as cadmium and lead. "We need more cardiologists to be thinking about environmental effects on the heart," said Dr Gervasio Lamas, a cardiologist in Miami. "It's affecting our patients."

    The growing interest in metallic compounds has led to a new understanding of how materials do harm on a cellular level. Arsenic may not be a heavy metal, but it shares some similarities, including the ability to cause free radical damage to cells, stressing delicate blood vessels and thickening arterial walls. It can also scar cells in a way that causes artery walls to thicken, restricting blood flow.


loading...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Like It?
Share It!







Follow Penmai on Twitter