Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links
Penmai eMagazine November! | All Issues

User Tag List

Like Tree245Likes

Health Bulletin


Discussions on "Health Bulletin" in "Health" forum.


  1. #11
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Scientists develop new gel-based drug delivery system

    Japanese scientists have developed a new drug-delivery gel that releases the drug in response to pressure applied by the patient, Science Daily reports.
    A research group headed by Katsuhiko Ariga, principal investigator, Kohsaku Kawakami, scientist, and Hironori Izawa, a post-doctoral researcher (currently assistant professor, Tottori University) of the NIMS International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA) succeeded in developing a gel material which is capable of releasing drugs in response to pressure applied.

    Drugs are generally taken by oral administration, injection, etc. However, the conventional methods may cause side effects and inconvenience. Although stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems are an effective technique that takes care of such problems, a special device is necessary in order to apply the stimulus.

    The MANA research group developed a gel material envisioning a new drug administration method in which the drug is released when the patient applies manual pressure to the gel, reports Science Daily.

    Using samples of the gel containing the anti-emetic drug ondansetron, the researchers confirmed that the drug was released when stimulus mimicking finger-pressure by the patient was applied, and found that this effect was maintained for at least three days.

    Oral administration of drugs is difficult for patients experiencing nausea during cancer chemotherapy. If the material is introduced under the skin, it is expected to release the drug simply by pressing or rubbing it.

    It will also be possible for patients to administer drugs under any environment at their own intention.

    For relief from cancer pain, hay fever, or asthma, patients may need to administer drugs quickly. Those are among the situations when this material offers an extremely convenient new dosing strategy.


    Sponsored Links
    sudhavaidhi likes this.

  2. #12
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Boiled Greek coffee may be key to longevity

    When looking to discover the "secrets of a longer life" many scientists turn to the elderly inhabitants of Ikaria, the Greek island, that boast the highest rates of longevity in the world.

    Now, researchers investigating cardiovascular health believe that a cup of boiled Greek coffee holds the clue to the elderly islanders' good health.

    Only 0.1 per cent of Europeans live to be over 90, yet on the Greek island of Ikaria, the figure is 1 per cent. This is recognized as one of the highest longevity rates anywhere - and the islanders tend to live out their longer lives in good health.

    Gerasimos Siasos, a medical doctor and professor at the University of Athens Medical School, Greece set out with his team to find out whether the elderly population's coffee drinking had an effect on their health.

    In particular, the researchers investigated links between coffee-drinking habits and the subjects'' endothelial function. The endothelium is a layer of cells that lines blood vessels, which is affected both by aging and by lifestyle habits (such as smoking).

    The team homed in on coffee because recent studies suggest that moderate coffee consumption may slightly reduce the risks of coronary heart disease, and that it may also have a positive impact on several aspects of endothelial health.

    From a sample of 673 Ikarians aged over 65 who lived on the island permanently, the researchers randomly selected 71 men and 71 women to take part in the study. Medical staff used health checks (for high blood pressure, diabetes, etc.) and questionnaires to get more detail on the participants' medical health, lifestyles and coffee drinking, in addition to testing their endothelial function.

    The researchers investigated all types of coffee taken by participants - but interestingly more than 87 per cent of those in the study consumed boiled, Greek coffee daily.

    More importantly, subjects consuming mainly boiled Greek coffee had better endothelial function than those who consumed other types of coffee. Even in those with high blood pressure, boiled Greek coffee consumption was associated with improved endothelial function, without worrying impacts on blood pressure.

    "Boiled Greek type of coffee, which is rich in polyphenols and antioxidants and contains only a moderate amount of caffeine, seems to gather benefits compared to other coffee beverages," Siasos said.

    The new study provides a new connection between nutritional habits and cardiovascular health. Given the extent of coffee drinking across the world, and the fact that even small health effects of at least one type of coffee could have a large impact on public health, this study provides an interesting starting point.

    However, further studies are needed to document the exact beneficial mechanisms of coffee on cardiovascular health, the researchers noted.

    The new study appeared in Vascular Medicine, published by SAGE.

    sudhavaidhi likes this.

  3. #13
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Chewing gums ups junk food craving

    Chewing gum may lead people to eat chips, cookies and candy instead of fruits and vegetables because menthol — the chemical which gives gum its mintyfresh flavour — makes fruits and vegetables taste bitter, according to a new study.

    Some researchers have proposed that chewing gum could help people eat less and lead to weight loss, but the study, published in the journal Eating Behaviours, suggests that the chemical menthol in some types of gum makes fruits and vegetables taste funny. The chemical change is the same reason why "when you brush your teeth and then drink orange juice, it tastes bad," said study coauthor Christine Swoboda, a doctoral candidate in nutrition at Ohio State University.

    Only a few studies have looked at whether chewing gum aids weight loss, and these have found conflicting results, Swoboda told Livescience.

    It could be that the menthol in mint, which interacts with nutrients in fruits and veggies to create a bitter flavour, was turning people off to the healthy foods, she said.

    sudhavaidhi likes this.

  4. #14
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Statins in high doses can cause kidney injury

    Patients taking high-potency statins for high blood pressure are at a 34% higher risk of being hospitalized for acute kidney injury compared with those taking low-potency ones.

    With nearly 10 crore Indians suffering from high blood pressure, the use of statins is common in the country. Statins are often recommended to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease among high-risk patients. Nagging doubts have remained in the medical fraternity about whether statin therapy is specifically associated with greater adverse renal effects.

    Researchers from across Canada recently carried out an analysis, comparing patients who were prescribed high-potency statins with those who were prescribed low-potency statins in seven provinces and two international databases (the UK and the US) between 1997 and 2008. The health records of 20 lakh Canadians were used for those with and without chronic kidney disease. Patients were aged 40 years and above.

    Rosuvastatin (a statin) at doses of 10mg or more, atorvastatin at doses of 20mg or more, and simvastatin at doses of 40mg or more were defined as high potency and all others as low potency. They were categorised as high or low according to whether they would produce 45% or less reduction in LDL or bad cholesterol.

    sudhavaidhi likes this.

  5. #15
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Papaya could help combat world’s leading diseases

    A group of students from University of Karachi has explored health benefits of papaya and discovered some facts about the delicious tropical fruit, including its usage in lowering chances of heart attack and controlling diabetes.


    During the research, final year students of BS, Agriculture and Agribusiness Department, KU - Mariam Naseem and Muhammad Kamran Nasir - also discovered numerous advantages of papaya seeds.

    Speaking to Pakistan Daily Times, Naseem explained that juice of papaya seeds is every essential to protect kidney from becoming dysfunctional because seeds contains flavonoids and phenotic, which provides prevention from germs of such diseases.

    Besides this papaya seeds can also protect from number of infections and could also be used to clean intestines insects, she added.

    She cited that in Nigeria, 76.7 per cent children got rid from intestines insects by drinking juice of papaya seeds in seven days.

    People in Japan also believed that liver could be protected from diseases with usage of one teaspoon of papaya seeds, Naseem said.

    It seeds can be used with milk to avoid typhoid disease and it can also cure from hemorrhoids-kind diseases. Papaya seeds also contain a special compound, which helps to stop formation of tumor, Naseem added.

    Nasir, the other researcher, said papaya contain huge amount of vitamin C, potassium, calcium, iron, thiamin and magnesium.

    He noted that enzyme papain in papaya gives relief from indigestion and gastric problems, and added that chemical integrate carpain in papaya also helped from some kind of diseases.

    Besides papaya was also very useful to control or stop diabetes, Nasir said.

    He asserted that cancer can be eradicated through daily intake of papaya, as it contains chemical integrates such as lycopene and others.

    He further said that eating papaya daily could help reduce weight.

    He advised that patients suffering from hypertension to include papaya in their daily diet. Papaya also reduces chance of heart attack, he added.

    Nasir noted that papaya is also known as body cleaner as it helps to maintain internal body system at normal stage.

    Vitamin A in papaya helps improve the eyesight vision. It also increases fertility power in male and female, he said.

    Papaya helps to stop blood clothing in feet of people, who are in sedentary job while magnesium in papaya helps to eliminate face acnes. It also gives cure from soling on injuries.

    In addition, papaya also eliminates nausea and constipation complaints and it also protect from formation of emphysema in body of those who are habitual of smoking, the researchers said.

    sudhavaidhi likes this.

  6. #16
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    How yearning for lost love affects you

    People suffering from complicated grief may have difficulty recalling specific events from their past or imagining specific events in the future, but not when those events involve the partner they lost.

    This is the conclusion of a new study conducted by graduate student Donald Robinaugh and professor of psychology Richard McNally of Harvard University.

    The death of a loved one is among the most painful and disruptive experiences a person can face. For most, the grief subsides over time. But those who suffer from complicated grief continue to yearn for the lost loved one, experience waves of painful emotion, and feel hopeless about the future.

    Research suggests that that people who suffer from complicated grief, similar to those who suffer from post-trauamatic stress disorder or major depression, have difficulty recalling many of the specific memories of their past.

    But there's an exception: They often retain their ability to recall specific memories for events that include the lost loved one.

    Robinaugh and McNally were intrigued by this cognitive paradox, and it raised another question: Do thoughts of lost loved ones also shape how people with complicated grief think about the future?

    To find out, the researchers recruited adults who had lost their spouse or life partner in the last one to three years. Some of the participants showed signs of complicated grief, while others showed signs of more typical bereavement.

    The participants completed a series of tasks to assess their memory for past events and their ability to imagine future events, both with and without the deceased. They were asked to generate specific events based on positive cue words (e.g., safe, happy, successful, loved) and negative cue words (e.g., hurt, sad, afraid, angry).

    Adults suffering from complicated grief showed deficits in their ability to recall specific autobiographical memories and to imagine specific events in the future compared to adults experiencing typical grief, but only for events that did not include the deceased. They showed no difficulty generating events that included the partner they had lost.

    "Most striking to us was the ease with which individuals with complicated grief were able to imagine the future with the deceased relative to their difficulty imagining the future without the deceased," said Robinaugh and McNally.

    "They frequently imagined landmark life events — such as the birth of their first child or a 50th wedding anniversary — that had long since become impossible. Yet, this impossible future was more readily imagined than one that could, at that point, realistically occur," they said.

    These findings point to a cognitive mechanism underlying the distressed yearning that is characteristic of complicated grief.

    The research also underscores the importance of generating goals and aspirations for the future after the loss of a loved one. According to the researchers, "setting goals and working toward them may be an important component of natural recovery from the disruptive and painful experience of loss."

    The study was published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

    sudhavaidhi likes this.

  7. #17
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    How yearning for lost love affects you

    People suffering from complicated grief may have difficulty recalling specific events from their past or imagining specific events in the future, but not when those events involve the partner they lost.

    This is the conclusion of a new study conducted by graduate student Donald Robinaugh and professor of psychology Richard McNally of Harvard University.

    The death of a loved one is among the most painful and disruptive experiences a person can face. For most, the grief subsides over time. But those who suffer from complicated grief continue to yearn for the lost loved one, experience waves of painful emotion, and feel hopeless about the future.

    Research suggests that that people who suffer from complicated grief, similar to those who suffer from post-trauamatic stress disorder or major depression, have difficulty recalling many of the specific memories of their past.

    But there's an exception: They often retain their ability to recall specific memories for events that include the lost loved one.

    Robinaugh and McNally were intrigued by this cognitive paradox, and it raised another question: Do thoughts of lost loved ones also shape how people with complicated grief think about the future?

    To find out, the researchers recruited adults who had lost their spouse or life partner in the last one to three years. Some of the participants showed signs of complicated grief, while others showed signs of more typical bereavement.

    The participants completed a series of tasks to assess their memory for past events and their ability to imagine future events, both with and without the deceased. They were asked to generate specific events based on positive cue words (e.g., safe, happy, successful, loved) and negative cue words (e.g., hurt, sad, afraid, angry).

    Adults suffering from complicated grief showed deficits in their ability to recall specific autobiographical memories and to imagine specific events in the future compared to adults experiencing typical grief, but only for events that did not include the deceased. They showed no difficulty generating events that included the partner they had lost.

    "Most striking to us was the ease with which individuals with complicated grief were able to imagine the future with the deceased relative to their difficulty imagining the future without the deceased," said Robinaugh and McNally.

    "They frequently imagined landmark life events such as the birth of their first child or a 50th wedding anniversary that had long since become impossible. Yet, this impossible future was more readily imagined than one that could, at that point, realistically occur," they said.

    These findings point to a cognitive mechanism underlying the distressed yearning that is characteristic of complicated grief.

    The research also underscores the importance of generating goals and aspirations for the future after the loss of a loved one. According to the researchers, "setting goals and working toward them may be an important component of natural recovery from the disruptive and painful experience of loss."

    The study was published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

    sudhavaidhi likes this.

  8. #18
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Olive oil helps you feel full

    Olive oil leads to satiety, shows a study that points out the mechanism behind it.

    Reduced-fat food products are gaining popularity. More and more people are choosing "light" products in an attempt to lose weight, or at least in the hope that they would not gain pounds.

    But whether these products are effective or not is a matter of dispute: while it is true that they contain fewer calories, people tend to overcompensate by eating more if they do not feel full.

    Now a study has shown how "natural" oils and fats regulate the sensation of feeling full after eating, with olive oil leading the way.

    So what makes this oil so effective?

    Work groups at Germany's Technische Universitat Munchen (TUM) under professor Peter Schieberle and at the University of Vienna under professor Veronika Somoza studied four different edible fats and oils -- lard, butterfat, rapeseed oil and olive oil.

    Over a period of three months, the study participants ate 500 gm of low-fat yoghurt enriched with one of the four fats or oils every day -- as a supplement to their normal diet, reports Science Daily.

    "Olive oil had the biggest satiety effect," said Schieberle.

    "The olive oil group showed a higher concentration of the satiety hormone serotonin in their blood. Subjectively speaking, these participants also reported that they found the olive oil yoghurt very filling," he added.

    During the study period, no member of this group recorded an increase in their body fat percentage or their weight.

    "Our findings show that aroma is capable of regulating satiety," Schieberle said. "We hope that this work will pave the way for the development of more effective reduced-fat food products that are nonetheless satiating," he said.

    sudhavaidhi likes this.

  9. #19
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Eating soybeans could cut cancer risk
    Proteins found in soybeans, could inhibit growth of colon, liver and lung cancers, a new study has revealed.

    Soybean meal is a bi-product following oil extraction from soybean seeds. It is rich in protein, which usually makes up around 40 percent of the nutritional components of the seeds and dependent on the line, and can also contain high oleic acid (a monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid).

    The study, conducted by scientists from University of Arkansas, looked at the role soybeans could have in the prevention of cancer.
    Using a variety of soybean lines which were high in oleic acid and protein, the researchers looked to monitor bioactivity between the peptides derived from the meals of soybean and various types of human cancer cells.

    The study showed that peptides derived from soybean meal significantly inhibited cell growth by 73 percent for colon cancer, 70 percent for liver cancer and 68 percent for lung cancer cells using human cell lines.

    This shows that the selected high oleic acid soybean lines could have a potential nutraceutical affect in helping to reduce the growth of several types of cancer cells.

    The study is published in published in Food Research International.

    sudhavaidhi likes this.

  10. #20
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Ice from fast food restaurants dirtier than toilet water

    Ice from fast food restaurants is dirtier than toilet water, a school science project by a 12-year-old found.

    Jasmine Roberts collected ice samples from five restaurants in South Florida for her award-winning project-from both self-serve machines inside the restaurant and from drive-thru windows.

    She then collected toilet water samples from the same restaurants and tested all of them for bacteria at the University of South Florida.

    In several cases, the ice tested positive for E. coli bacteria, which comes from human waste and has been linked to several illness outbreaks across the country, ABC News reported.
    "These [bacteria] don`t belong there. It`s not cause for panic, although it is alarming because what she found is nothing new. You`re not more likely to get sick now. But she`s done us a favor by sounding the alarm," Dr. David Katz, medical contributor to `Good Morning America` said.

    Both Roberts and Katz said that the ice is likely dirtier because machines aren`t cleaned and people use unwashed hands to scoop ice.

    Toilet water is also surprisingly bacteria-free, because it comes from sanitized city water supplies.

    Roberts got interested in the project after reading a newspaper article about bacteria in airplane water and decided to do something similar. Plus, she said, all of her friends chew on ice, and it drives her crazy.

    sudhavaidhi likes this.

loading...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Like It?
Share It!







Follow Penmai on Twitter