Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links
Penmai eMagazine December! | All Issues

User Tag List

Like Tree245Likes

Health Bulletin


Discussions on "Health Bulletin" in "Health" forum.


  1. #201
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    PoornaSudha Cancer Foundation develops 'MOM Express'

    The PoornaSudha Cancer Foundation, a registered non-profit organization both in India and USA, along with the Rotary Bangalore West, Rotary International District-3190, Rotary club of Gold Coast Lake Success, USA and Rotary Foundation has developed 'MOM Express' (Mobile On-site Mammography), a unique initiative for women of Karnataka. Dedicated to community outreach and breast care education, MOM Express is a mobile unit equipped with traditional mammography equipment donated by the Rotary.

    By bringing high quality mobile mammography services and screenings directly to communities, the mobile unit helps break down all barriers thus making mammograms more accessible. Women aged 35-70 in both rural and urban area will benefit from this service as the bus covers many districts of Karnataka.

    Mammography will be offered free for BPL women and a nominal charge will be taken from the other income groups.

    "It's a dream being realized for PoornaSudha and we believe that MOM Express will be a significant move towards early detection and will encourage women to obtain timely treatment of breast cancer in Karnataka. We hope to raise awareness and emphasize early diagnosis," said Poornima Sudhindra, founding member of the PoornaSudha Cancer Foundation on the occasion.

    The main advantage of MOM Express is that it provides a simple, convenient, cost-effective doorstep screening opportunity. The screenings are performed by well-trained female mammography technicians; films will be read and interpreted by trained radiologists. The whole process will result in diagnosing cancer at an early stage; which greatly increases the chance of survival.


    Sponsored Links

  2. #202
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    What is uric acid level?

    Uric acid is a product of the metabolic breakdown of purine nucleotides from the foods you eat. Most of the uric acid is filtered out by the kidneys and passes out from the body through urine.

    A small amount passes out of the body in stool. But if too much uric acid is being produced or if the kidneys are not able to remove it from the blood naturally, the level of uric acid in the blood increases.

    Uric acid is a heterocyclic compound. It forms ions and salts known as urates and acid urates such as ammonium acid urate.

    Uric acid levels

    High blood concentrations of uric acid can lead to gout. The chemical associated with other medical conditions includes diabetes and the formation of ammonium acid urate kidney stones.

    In human blood plasma, the reference range of uric acid for males is between 3.6 mg/dL, and 2.3-6.6 mg/dL for woman. Uric acid concentrations in blood plasma above and below the normal range are known, respectively as Hyperuricemia and Hypouricemia.

    Lower serum values of uric acid have been associated with Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

    (Data Courtesy: Dr Sharad Kasarle, Medical Nutrition, Medical Herbalism & Functional Food Expert)


  3. #203
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Dancing can cut Parkinson’s woes

    Parkinson's patients can raise their mobility through dancing, according to a new study.

    Australia's La Trobe University along with the University of Limerick and St John of God Hospital in Venice are conducting a global study in this regard, a La Trobe University statement said.

    From Irish set dancing to creative dance, Parkinson's sufferers in Venice, Limerick and Melbourne are said to be enjoying the benefits of dancing. "Parkinson's disease results in muscle rigidity and tremors making it difficult for sufferers to move," Meg Morris, a lead researcher of the project at La Trobe University said. "We think dancing can improve mobility and reduce the number of falls in people with Parkinson's disease," Morris said.

    "But following trials in Melbourne last year we found that Parkinson's disease sufferers are "unlocked by dance", and are able to move more freely," Morris said.

    "We hope this research will provide practitioners with more effective therapy," he added. "Not only does dance help reduce symptoms, it also increases wellbeing, happiness and life quality among patients," Morris said, adding, "Every week I hear from participants about how thankful they are for the dance classes and for the research we are undertaking."

    Through the study Australia is fast becoming a world leader in Parkinson's disease research. Now a new study has also kicked in here trialling the Argentine Tango. Researchers are calling for otherwise healthy men and women with Parkinson's disease to participate in Argentine Tango dance classes.


  4. #204
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Dancing can cut Parkinson’s woes

    Parkinson's patients can raise their mobility through dancing, according to a new study.

    Australia's La Trobe University along with the University of Limerick and St John of God Hospital in Venice are conducting a global study in this regard, a La Trobe University statement said.

    From Irish set dancing to creative dance, Parkinson's sufferers in Venice, Limerick and Melbourne are said to be enjoying the benefits of dancing. "Parkinson's disease results in muscle rigidity and tremors making it difficult for sufferers to move," Meg Morris, a lead researcher of the project at La Trobe University said. "We think dancing can improve mobility and reduce the number of falls in people with Parkinson's disease," Morris said.

    "But following trials in Melbourne last year we found that Parkinson's disease sufferers are "unlocked by dance", and are able to move more freely," Morris said.

    "We hope this research will provide practitioners with more effective therapy," he added. "Not only does dance help reduce symptoms, it also increases wellbeing, happiness and life quality among patients," Morris said, adding, "Every week I hear from participants about how thankful they are for the dance classes and for the research we are undertaking."

    Through the study Australia is fast becoming a world leader in Parkinson's disease research. Now a new study has also kicked in here trialling the Argentine Tango. Researchers are calling for otherwise healthy men and women with Parkinson's disease to participate in Argentine Tango dance classes.


  5. #205
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Baby heart disease gene found

    Newcastle University researchers have discovered a gene that is associated with a form of congenital heart disease found in newborns.


    Professor Bernard Keavney led the team of researchers that analysed more than 2,000 newborns, who were born with a hole in their heart, the BBC reported.

    Keavney said that his team found that a common genetic variation near a gene called Msx1 was strongly associated with the risk of a particular type of congenital heart disease called atrial septal defect or hole in the heart.

    The research is set to be published in the Nature Genetics journal.


  6. #206
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Magnolia tree bark extract supports muscles

    Honokiol - a powerful polyphenol compound extracted from Magnolia officinalis bark - protects muscles from the normal inflammation caused by intense exercise, a new research has found.

    This study broadens honokiol's acknowledged benefits in supporting and maintaining overall health and wellness.

    Extended exercise can cause normal stress in skeletal muscles. Marathons, triathlons and other feats of strength and endurance typically generate inflammation in the muscles as a result of exertion. However, honokiol is shown to address this normal inflammation response, and support faster recovery from intense exercise.

    "Honokiol is an incredibly versatile botanical extract derived from magnolia bark, which has been used in traditional Asian herbalism for centuries," said product formulator and integrative health pioneer, Dr. Isaac Eliaz. M.D., M.S., L.Ac.

    "That's why we put so much effort into creating HonoPure, which is 98 percent pure honokiol. This study adds another layer of information supporting honokiol's beneficial attributes," Dr. Eliaz noted.

    In the study, researchers had rats perform an intense exercise regimen, both with and without oral intake of honokiol. The honokiol-fed rats were spared a great deal of the normal inflammation associated with extended exercise. Specifically, honokiol reduced the expression of a wide variety of inflammatory proteins that are generated normally by excessive exercise.

    This research could be excellent news for both weekend warriors and elite athletes, as honokiol's ability to prevent normal inflammation from extended exercise could offer significant benefits for those engaged in active workout regimens.

    In addition to this exercise study, a number of pre-clinical studies conducted over the past two decades have shown that honokiol strongly supports cellular health. In particular, the compound has been found to support prostate, lung, liver, colon and breast cells.

    Honokiol also offers powerful antioxidant support. Again, a number of pre-clinical studies have shown it is up to 1,000 times more powerful than vitamin E in its antioxidant abilities. Research has also confirmed one of honokiol's most ancient applications—the ability to support gentle relaxation and restful sleep.

    Pure honokiol is easily absorbed, allowing it to quickly circulate throughout the body. Because the compound is so small, it is also shown to cross the blood-brain barrier and support cognitive health. With its high purity and wide range of applications, EcoNugenics' HonoPure is an ideal daily supplement to promote numerous areas of health.

    The latest study was published in the European Journal of Pharmacology.


  7. #207
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Magnolia tree bark extract supports muscles

    Honokiol - a powerful polyphenol compound extracted from Magnolia officinalis bark - protects muscles from the normal inflammation caused by intense exercise, a new research has found.

    This study broadens honokiol's acknowledged benefits in supporting and maintaining overall health and wellness.

    Extended exercise can cause normal stress in skeletal muscles. Marathons, triathlons and other feats of strength and endurance typically generate inflammation in the muscles as a result of exertion. However, honokiol is shown to address this normal inflammation response, and support faster recovery from intense exercise.

    "Honokiol is an incredibly versatile botanical extract derived from magnolia bark, which has been used in traditional Asian herbalism for centuries," said product formulator and integrative health pioneer, Dr. Isaac Eliaz. M.D., M.S., L.Ac.

    "That's why we put so much effort into creating HonoPure, which is 98 percent pure honokiol. This study adds another layer of information supporting honokiol's beneficial attributes," Dr. Eliaz noted.

    In the study, researchers had rats perform an intense exercise regimen, both with and without oral intake of honokiol. The honokiol-fed rats were spared a great deal of the normal inflammation associated with extended exercise. Specifically, honokiol reduced the expression of a wide variety of inflammatory proteins that are generated normally by excessive exercise.

    This research could be excellent news for both weekend warriors and elite athletes, as honokiol's ability to prevent normal inflammation from extended exercise could offer significant benefits for those engaged in active workout regimens.

    In addition to this exercise study, a number of pre-clinical studies conducted over the past two decades have shown that honokiol strongly supports cellular health. In particular, the compound has been found to support prostate, lung, liver, colon and breast cells.

    Honokiol also offers powerful antioxidant support. Again, a number of pre-clinical studies have shown it is up to 1,000 times more powerful than vitamin E in its antioxidant abilities. Research has also confirmed one of honokiol's most ancient applications—the ability to support gentle relaxation and restful sleep.

    Pure honokiol is easily absorbed, allowing it to quickly circulate throughout the body. Because the compound is so small, it is also shown to cross the blood-brain barrier and support cognitive health. With its high purity and wide range of applications, EcoNugenics' HonoPure is an ideal daily supplement to promote numerous areas of health.

    The latest study was published in the European Journal of Pharmacology.


  8. #208
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Fridays and late nights not good for hospital admission after heart attack: US study

    In a rather bizarre finding, analysis of nearly one million heart failure cases in hospitals has shown that death and length of hospitalisation are highest in patients admitted in January, or on Fridays, or in the night.

    The analysis of 949,907 hospitalisations for congestive heart failure admissions over 14 years (1994 to 2007) in all hospitals in New York state in US was presented by Dr David P. Kao from Denver, Colorado at the Heart Failure Congress 2013 at Lisbon. The event was organised by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

    As expected, the researchers found that daily heart failure admissions increased significantly over this period while in-hospital death and length of stay decreased.

    "These findings confirm the huge decline in mortality in hospitals for heart failure over the past 14-15 years following major advances in therapy," Dr Kao said, in a statement by the ESC.

    But the startling findings related to month, day and hour of admission. Daily heart failure admissions peaked in February, while in-hospital death and length of stay peaked in January. Death and length of stay were lowest for admissions in the morning, between 6 am and 12 noon but became highest overnight for admissions between 6 pm and midnight by a small margin, according to the ESC statement.

    The research also found that chances of death and length of stay were lowest in patients admitted on Monday and highest on Friday, the study said.

    The reasons for these strange findings were not clear to the researchers although they had some theories, and they definitely disproved some popular notions.

    The reason for the winter spike in heart failure admissions was suggested to be higher chances of pneumonia among the elderly in cold weather.
    The findings suggest that staffing may have an impact on seasonal variations in mortality and length of stay.

    "The fact that patients admitted right before the weekend and in the middle of the night do worse and are in hospital longer suggests that staffing levels may contribute to the findings," Dr Kao said

    "Doctors and hospitals need to be more vigilant during these higher risk times and ensure that adequate resources are in place to cope with demand. Patients should be aware that their disease is not the same over the course of the year and they may be at higher risk during the winter. People often avoid coming into hospital during the holidays because of family pressures and a personal desire to stay at home but they may be putting themselves in danger," Dr Kao said.


  9. #209
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    '50% women, 20% men in India have blood disorders'

    Several types of blood disorders are prevalent among the Indian people, with half the women and a fifth of the men in the country suffering from them. Those of Aryan descent are more prone to them than those with Dravidian ancestors, said senior haematologist Dr MB Agarwal recently.

    Dr Agarwal was in the city for a CME and public forum organized by the city branch of Indian Academy of Paediatrics and Thalassaemia Society of Central India. He spoke to the doctors about the advances of managing the disease and gave the parents some important tips about taking care of their children suffering from thalassaemia.

    "Blood disorders like anaemia, iron and vitamin deficiency, intestinal worms, excessive bleeding during periods in women and piles are some of the most common ones among Indians," informed Dr Agarwal. He also spoke about the two hypotheses about how thalassaemia made its way among the Indian people.

    "One theory says that being an equatorial population, the genes that cause thalasaemia developed among some tribes and communities as a defence mechanism against malaria. This happened as an evolutionary gene mutation. The other idea is that the Greeks, among whom the disease was widespread, mixed with the local populations, giving them the disease," said Dr Agarwal.

    Since the mixing happened primarily with people of North India, it is mostly seen in Aryans and is negligible among Dravidians. Another blood disorder that is common among certain ethnic groups from the North is glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, he said.


  10. #210
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,217

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Probiotic yogurt can alter brain functions?

    Eating probiotic yogurt can not only alter your gut bacteria for the better, it may also change your brain function, scientists say.

    University of California, Los Angeles, researchers now have the first evidence that bacteria ingested in food can affect brain function in humans. In a small study of healthy women, between the ages of 18 and 55, researchers found that women who regularly consumed beneficial bacteria known as probiotics through yogurt showed altered brain function, both while in a resting state and in response to an emotion-recognition task. The discovery that changing the bacterial environment, or microbiota, in the gut can affect the brain carries significant implications for future research that could point the way toward dietary or drug interventions to improve brain function, the researchers said.

    "Many of us have a container of yogurt in our refrigerator that we may eat for enjoyment, for calcium or because we think it might help our health in other ways," said Dr Kirsten Tillisch, an associate professor of medicine at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine and lead author of the study. "Our findings indicate that some of the contents of yogurt may actually change the way our brain responds to the environment," he said.


loading...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Like It?
Share It!







Follow Penmai on Twitter