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Health Bulletin


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  1. #2141
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Study: Sitting is bad for children, too


    Children who sit too much may face adult-sized health consequences, according to a sobering new study of healthy young girls. The study found that after a single session of prolonged inactivity, the children developed changes in their blood flow and arteries that, in grown-ups, would signal the start of serious cardiovascular problems.

    There is plenty of evidence, of course, that uninterrupted sitting dents the health of adults. For the new study , Ali McManus, an asso ciate professor of pediatric exercise physiology at the University of British Columbia in Kelowna, and her colleagues decided to ask children to sit still.

    In general, today's children are doing plenty of that. One recent large-scale epidemiological study reported that children across the globe sit for about 8.5 hours every day . Another recent study found that activity levels among children drop precipitously after about age 8 and continue to fall through adolescence, with young people trading movement for sitting.


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    Re: Health Bulletin

    `Babies smile to make you smile back'

    Babies smile in order to make those they are interacting with smile back using sophisticated timing much like comedians, who time their jokes to maximise audience response, researchers have found.

    In the study, researchers programmed a toddler-like robot to behave like babies and had the robot interact with 32 students. They found that the robot got the undergraduates to smile as much as possible, while smiling as little as possible.

    "If you've interacted with babies, you suspect they're up to something when they're smiling. They're not just smiling randomly ," said Javier Movellan, a research scientist in California and one of the study's autho


  3. #2143
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Paraplegic man walks using only his brain power

    A brain-to-computer echnology that can translate thoughts into leg movements has enab ed a man paralysed from the waist down by a spinal cord injury to become the first such patient to walk without the use of robotics, doctors n Southern California reported on Wednesday. The slow, halting first steps of the 28-year-old paraplegic were documented in a preliminary study published in the British-based Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, along with a YouTube video.

    The feat was accomplished using a system allowing the brain o bypass the injured spinal cord and instead send messages through a computer algorithm to elec rodes placed around the patient's knees to trigger controlled eg muscle movements.

    Researchers at the University of California, Irvine, say the outcome marks a promising but incremental achievement in the development of brain-computer interfaces that may one day help stroke and spinal injury victims regain some mobility . Dr An Do, a study co-author, said clinical applications were many years away .Results of the UC Irvine research still need to be replicated in other pa ients and greatly refined. Nevertheless, the study proved it possible "to restore intuitive, brain-controlled walking after a complete spinal cord injury ," said biomedical engineer Zoran Nenadic, who led the research. The steps taken a year ago by the experiment's subject, former graduate student Adam Fritz, who injured his back in a motorcycle accident, appear modest as seen in the video.

    Fritz propelled himself over a distance of 3.6 metres (11.8 feet) across the floor of UC Irvine's iMove Lab, though his weight was partially supported by an overhead suspension harness and a walker he grasped to keep his body upright, researchers said. The weight support was necessary because the patient lacked any sensation in his legs or feet, Do explained.


  4. #2144
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    ஜப்பானில் விஞ்ஞானிகள் உருவாக்கிய சேர்க்கை சிறுநீரகம்: எலியிடம் நடத்திய சோதனையில் வெற்றி

    ஜப்பானில் விஞ்ஞானிகள் உருவாக்கிய சேர்க்கை சிறுநீரகம் எலி மற்றும் பன்றியிடம் செய்யப்பட்ட சோதனை வெற்றியடைந்தது.

    உறுப்பு மாற்று அறுவை சிகிச்சைக்கு உடல் பாகங்கள் தட்டுப்பாடு உள்ளதால் மனிதர்களின் உறுப்புகள் ஆய்வகத்தில் வைத்து விஞ்ஞானிகளால் தயாரிக்கப்படுகிறது. அது போன்று சிறுநீரகங்கள் உருவாக்கும் முயற்சியில் ஜப்பானில் டோக்கியோவில் உள்ள ஜி.கே மருந்து பல்கலைக்கழகத்தை சேர்ந்த விஞ்ஞானி டாக்டர் தக்ஷி யோகோ தலைமையிலான குழு செயற்கை சிறுநீரகம் உருவாக்கும் முயற்சியில் ஈடுபட்டனர்.

    மனிதர்கள் ஸ்டெம் செல்களை பயன்படுத்தி ஆய்வகத்தில் வைத்து அதி நவீன தொழில்நுட்ப முறையில் உருவாக்கப்பட்டது. அவற்றை எலி மற்றும் பன்றியின் உடலில் பொருத்தி பரிசோதித்து பார்த்தனர். அப்போது இந்த சிறுநீரகம் ரத்தத்தில் இருந்து சிறுநீரைப் பிரித்து வெளியேற்றியது. அதன் மூலம் இந்த சோதனை வெற்றி என அறிவிக்கப்பட்டுள்ளது. இதற்கு முன்பு ஒரு முறை பரிசோதிக்கப்பட்டபோது சிறுநீரை சிறுநீரகம் வெளியேற்றவில்லை.

    தற்போது அதை மேம்படுத்தி வெற்றிகரமாக செயல்படுத்தியுள்ளனர். முதலில் எலியிலும், அதன் பின்னர் பன்றியிலும் இச்சோதனை நடத்தப்பட்டது.


  5. #2145
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    2 beers a week may lower heart attack risk in women


    Women who drink beer at most once or twice per week have a 30% lower risk of heart attack, compared with both heavy drinkers and females who never drink beer, a new Swedish study has found.

    Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, followed a representative selection of the middle-aged female population from 1968 to 2000 (when the women in the study were between 70 and 92 years old).

    With the data from the study, the researchers attempted to chart the relationship between the intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and the incidence of heart attacks, stroke, diabetes and cancer.

    The study showed that women who reported that they drank beer once or twice per week to once or twice per month ran a 30% lower risk of a heart attack than women who drank beer several times per week/daily or never drank beer.


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    Re: Health Bulletin

    New chip-based technology to detect Ebola virus

    Researchers have developed a chip-based technology that can be integrated into a portable instrument for use in field situations where rapid, accurate detection of Ebola infections is needed to control outbreaks.

    Laboratory tests using preparations of Ebola virus and other hemorrhagic fever viruses showed that the system has the sensitivity and specificity needed to provide a viable clinical assay, researchers said.

    The current gold standard for Ebola virus detection relies on a method called polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify the virus's genetic material for detection.

    Because PCR works on DNA molecules and Ebola is an RNA virus, the reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to make DNA copies of the viral RNA prior to PCR amplification and detection.

    "Compared to our system, PCR detection is more complex and requires a laboratory setting," said senior author Holger Schmidt, professor of Optoelectronics at University of California, Santa Cruz.

    "We're detecting the nucleic acids directly, and we achieve a comparable limit of detection to PCR and excellent specificity," Schmidt said.

    In laboratory tests, the system provided sensitive detection of Ebola virus while giving no positive counts in tests with two related viruses, Sudan virus and Marburg virus.

    Testing with different concentrations of Ebola virus demonstrated accurate quantification of the virus over six orders of magnitude.

    Adding a "preconcentration" step during sample processing on the microfluidic chip extended the limit of detection well beyond that achieved by other chip-based approaches, covering a range comparable to PCR analysis.

    "The measurements were taken at clinical concentrations covering the entire range of what would be seen in an infected person," Schmidt said.

    Schmidt's lab at UC Santa Cruz worked with researchers at Brigham Young University and UC Berkeley to develop the system. Virologists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio prepared the viral samples for testing.

    The system combined a microfluidic chip for sample preparation and an optofluidic chip for optical detection.

    The microfluidic chip was made of a silicon-based polymer, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and had microvalves and fluidic channels to transport the sample between nodes for various sample preparation steps.

    The targeted molecules - in this case, Ebola virus RNA - were isolated by binding to a matching sequence of synthetic DNA (called an oligonucleotide) attached to magnetic microbeads.

    The microbeads were collected with a magnet, nontarget biomolecules were washed off, and the bound targets were then released by heating, labelled with fluorescent markers, and transferred to the optofluidic chip for optical detection.

    The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.


  7. #2147
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    25-30% working population in Belagavi prone to heart blockages: Study


    Around 25%-30% of working population in Belagavi is prone to heart blockages, revealed the survey conducted by Indus Health Plus in association with KLES Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre.

    Study revealed on the occasion of World Heart Day, indicates that sedentary lifestyle and lack of exercise has increased the risk factors of heart diseases by 10%-15% as compared to last two years. It has been also found in the study that 15%-20% females from urban population were obese and in high risk of heart stroke.


  8. #2148
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Every third Indian over 18 has high BP


    If you lead a sedentary lifestyle, take stress and have little control over what you eat, be concerned. For, these are the key factors causing hypertension which, a new survey reveals, affect one out of every three Indians who are 18 years or above.

    Hypertension is the most common cause of non-communicable diseases in India mainly heart diseases, stroke and kidney disease.

    Dr S Ramakrishnan, who led the survey based on the blood pressure measurement of more than 1 lakh people across the country, said 60% of people, who had high blood pressure, were not even were aware about it. "The incidence of heart attack among the young has gone up significantly over the past decade.

    We found that 13% of subjects in 18 to 30 years of age and 25% of the subjects in 31 to 45 age group had hypertension," added Dr Ramakrishnan, additional professor, department of cardiology at AIIMS.

    Nearly 25,000 people from Delhi participated in the survey, said Dr Ashok Seth, chairman, Fortis Escorts Heart Institute. He added, "The prevalence of hypertension has increased from 2% to 25% among the urban residents and from 2% to 15% among the rural residents in the past six decades." It is estimated that 16% of ischaemic heart disease, 21% of peripheral vascular disease, 24% of acute myocardial infarctions and 29% of strokes are attributable to hypertension., underlining the huge impact effective hypertension prevention and control can have on reducing the rising burden of cardiovascular disease.

    Dr H K Chopra, president of the Cardiological Society of India, said most people suffering from high blood pressure can benefit from simple lifestyle changes like diet control and physical activity, and reduction in alcohol consumption, smoking and obesity.


  9. #2149
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    More young women have high levels of bad cholesterol: Study

    A pan-India study of young women from 10 metros and non-metros found 61% had excess LDL or high 'bad cholesterol' levels, putting them at risk of developing cardiovascular disease early in life.

    Over 86% of those surveyed had a body mass index above normal, highlighting how obesity could be a rapidly emerging contributor of heart diseases among women. Around 65% of women in the city, above the age of 30 years, showed LDL levels beyond 100 mg/dl. A staggering 89% of women with higher LDL also had higher BMI while 78% had high belly fat or a broad waistline.

    At the root of more pre-menopausal women developing heart disease is a lethal combination of stress, bad eating habits, erratic hours and absolute lack of physical activity, say cardiologists. The Saffolalife study found 23% women in the city had dinner after 10pm. Even choice of food, mostly a diet rich in transfats, fried snacks, cheese and sweetened beverages, have experts worried. An unusually high number of 86% respondents from the city gave a history of consuming preserved food, which is high on salt, thrice a week.

    Dietician Nitin Desai said a late dinner is now a regular feature among urban women due to work commitments. Interestingly, 88% of women in Kolkata also have late dinners but only 50% of respondents were found to be at risk of developing a heart condition. Cardiologist Dr Brian Pinto, who consults with Holy Family Hospital, said the predominance of fish in their diet could be shielding them from developing heart problems early. He added, "More women are transitioning from the cardio-protective pear shape body to apple shape with increasing waistlines and truncal obesity. In addition, smoking, low levels of physical activity, diabetes, high BP and other lifestyle factors are responsible for fat redistribution in women while accelerating their risk of CVDs".

    Dr Ramakant Panda, vice-chairman of Asian Heart Institute, said though traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease affect both women and men, the development of heart disease in women follows a slightly different logic. "Smoking and diabetes, for instance, pose greater risk factors for heart disease in women. Mental stress too affects women's hearts more," he said.


  10. #2150
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Too much sleep can spell cardiac trouble

    Just as binge eating can put you at risk for cardiovascular diseases, binge sleeping too can play havoc with your heart, say doctors.

    "Studies show that too little sleep as well as too much sleep contributes to a higher cardiovascular disease rate," says Dr Suresh Kumar, neurophysician at the Sree Balaji Medical College and Hospital, Chennai. A third category of people who have disturbed sleep such as in the case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are also at risk of cardiovascular complications, he adds. "Untreated OSA is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and heart failure both in elderly and young adults. It increases the risk of having a heart attack or stroke by 20%," says Dr Suresh.

    Sleep of more than eight hours is considered excessive, according to the `Sleep and Mortality: A Population-Based 22Year Follow-Up Study' published in 2007 in the US National Library of Medicine, while too little sleep is less than seven hours. The study states that "significantly increased risk of mortality" was observed both for short sleep in men and in women, and for long sleep too.

    "We have patients who sleep longer than 10 hours a day , which is too much as it can lead to sedentary lifestyles, lethargy and weight gain, which can translate to heart disease at a later stage," says Dr Suresh. Likewise, he adds, people who sleep less than three hours a day can experience irritability, increased blood pressure, hypertension and drowsiness.

    According to a recent report in TOI, a study conducted by a Gurgaon-based private hospital has revealed that 90% of young heart attack victims are people who do not sleep well. The study was conducted over two-and-a-half years on 104 patients at Medanta below 40 years. These patients were admitted in the hospital's emergency ward after suffering a heart attack, when it was found that of the 104 patients, 68 had average sleep time of less than six hours through the entire day .

    According to Dr Rajneesh Kapoor, a cardiologist at Medanta, quoted in the report, sleep deprivation upsets the balance of key hormones Leptin and Ghrelin, which regulate appetite.

    Exercise, a healthy diet, alcohol in moderation, and no smoking can reduce the risk of heart attacks. Regular physical activity (not too close to bedtime) can help people not just fall asleep faster but sleep better too, say doctors. Another key is getting up and going to bed at the same time every day .


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