Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links
Penmai eMagazine November! | All Issues

User Tag List

Like Tree245Likes

Health Bulletin


Discussions on "Health Bulletin" in "Health" forum.


  1. #2451
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,182

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Moderate physical activity reduces heart attack risk by 50% in seniors

    If senior citizens do moderate physical activity, their chances of death by heart disease may reduce by as much as 50%, a new study has found. The research findings were presented at European Society of Cardiology Congress 2016 being held in Rome currently.

    The 12 year study involved nearly 2500 adults aged 65 to 74 years. High levels of physical activity led to greater risk reductions.

    "The role of physical activity in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in people of working age is well established," said Professor Riitta Antikainen, professor of geriatrics at the University of Oulu, Finland. "But relatively little is known about the effect of regular physical activity on CVD risk in older people."

    The present study assessed the association between leisure time physical activity and CVD risk and mortality in 2456 men and women aged 65 to 74 years who were enrolled into the National FINRISK Study between 1997 and 2007.

    The researchers classified self-reported physical activity as:

    Low: reading, watching TV or working in the household without much physical activity.

    Moderate: walking, cycling or practising other forms of light exercise (fishing, gardening, hunting) at least four hours per week.

    High: recreational sports (for example running, jogging, skiing, gymnastics, swimming, ball games or heavy gardening) or intense training or sports competitions at least three hours a week.

    During a median follow-up of 11.8 years, 197 participants died from CVD and 416 had a first CVD event.

    When the researchers assessed the link between physical activity and outcome they adjusted for other cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, smoking and cholesterol) and social factors (marital status and education). To minimise reverse causality, where worse health leads to less physical activity, patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, cancer, or prior stroke at baseline were excluded from the analysis.


    The investigators found that moderate and high leisure time physical activity were associated with a 31% and 45% reduced risk of an acute CVD event, respectively (figure 1). Moderate and high leisure time physical activity were associated with a 54% and 66% reduction in CVD mortality.

    "Our study provides further evidence that older adults who are physically active have a lower risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and death from cardiovascular disease. The protective effect of leisure time physical activity is dose dependent - in other words, the more you do, the better. Activity is protective even if you have other risk factors for cardiovascular disease such as high cholesterol," Antikainen said


    "Physical exercise may become more challenging with ageing. However, it is important for older people to still get enough safe physical activity to stay healthy after their transition to retirement," she added.


    Sponsored Links

  2. #2452
    vijaykumar12's Avatar
    vijaykumar12 is offline Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Male
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    India
    Posts
    12,558

    Re: Health Bulletin

    ஸ்டான்லி மருத்துவமனையில் தோல் வங்கி தொடக்கம்


    சென்னை ஸ்டான்லி மருத்துவமனையில் தோல் வங்கி புதிதாக தொடங்கப்பட்டுள்ளது. ஒருவரிடமிருந்து தானமாகப் பெறும் தோலை 5 ஆண்டுகள் வரை தோல் வங்கியில் சேமித்து வைக்க முடியும். பல்வேறு தீக்காயங்களில் தோலை இழந்தவர்களுக்கு இந்த தோலைப் பயன்படுத்த முடியும் என தோல்சிகிச்சைப் பிரிவின் தலைவர் டாக்டர் ரத்னவேல் கூறியுள்ளார்.


  3. #2453
    vijaykumar12's Avatar
    vijaykumar12 is offline Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Male
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    India
    Posts
    12,558

    Re: Health Bulletin

    உலகம் முழுவதும் சுமார் 250 கோடி பேர் ஜிகா வைரஸால் பாதிக்கப்பட வாய்ப்பு


    ”தி லேன்செட் இன்ஃபெக்‌ஷியஸ் டிசீசஸ்” என்ற மருத்துவ இதழில் உலக அளவில் சுமார் 250 கோடி பேருக்கு ஜிகா வைரஸ் பாதிப்பு ஏற்பட வாய்ப்பு உள்ளதாக கூறப்பட்டுள்ளது.

    குறிப்பாக, இந்தியா, பாகிஸ்தான் மற்றும் நைஜீரியா உள்ளிட்ட நாடுகளி்ல் உள்ள மக்களுக்கு அதிக அளவில் பரவ வாய்ப்பு உள்ளதாக இந்த ஆய்வில் எச்சரிக்கப்பட்டுள்ளது.

    ஜிகா வைரஸ், கர்ப்பத்தில் இருக்கும் சிசுக்களுக்கு மூளைப் பாதிப்பை ஏற்படுத்துவதாக விஞ்ஞானிகள் எச்சரித்துள்ளனர்.


  4. #2454
    vijaykumar12's Avatar
    vijaykumar12 is offline Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Male
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    India
    Posts
    12,558

    Re: Health Bulletin

    புற்றுநோயைக் குணப்படுத்த ஒரே மாத்திரை

    Venetoclax எனும் மாத்திரைக்கு அமெரிக்காவின் உணவு மற்றும் மருந்து நிர்வாகம் அனுமதி அளித்துள்ளது. இந்த மாத்திரையை எடுத்துக்கொண்ட லுகேமியா(Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) நோயாளிகளில் 80% பேர் பக்க விளைவுகள் இல்லாமல் குணமடைந்துள்ளனர். கேன்சர் செல்களை அழிக்காமல், நோய் எதிர்ப்பு சக்தியைக் கூட்டுகிறது இது.


  5. #2455
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,182

    Re: Health Bulletin

    6 மாதத்துக்கு தாம்பத்தியம் கூடாது: ஜிகா வைரஸ் பாதிப்பு நாடுகளில் இருந்து வருபவர்களுக்கு எச்சரிக்கை

    ஜிகா வைரஸ் காய்ச்சல் நோய் பிரேசில் உள்ளிட்ட அமெரிக்க நாடுகளில் பரவியது.

    தற்போது மலேசியா, சிங்கப்பூர் போன்ற நாடுகளிலும் பரவி வருகிறது. 60 நாடுகளில் இந்த நோயின் தாக்கம் இருப்பது கண்டறியப்பட்டுள்ளது. ஒரு வகை கொசுவினால் இந்த நோய் பரவுகிறது.

    இந்த நோய் பாதிப்பு ஏற்பட்டுள்ள பகுதிகளில் இருந்து வருபவர்கள் 8 வாரத்துக்கு ஆணுறை பயன்படுத்தி தாம்பத்தியத்தில் ஈடுபடலாம் என உலக சுகாதார நிறுவனம் ஏற்கனவே கூறி இருந்தது.

    ஆனால், இப்போது 6 மாதத்துக்கு அவர்கள் தாம்பத்யத்தில் ஈடுபட கூடாது என்று கூறி இருக்கிறது.

    இத்தாலியை சேர்ந்த ஒருவர் ஜிகா வைரஸ் நோய் பாதித்த இடத்தில் இருந்து வந்திருந்தார். அவருடைய உயிரணுவில் 6 மாதத்துக்கு பிறகும் ஜிகா வைரஸ் உயிருடன் இருப்பது கண்டுபிடிக்கப்பட்டது.

    எனவே, உலக சுகாதார நிறுவனம் புதிய அறிவிப்பை வெளியிட்டுள்ளது. சிலருக்கு ஜிகா வைரஸ் தாக்கினால் அது வெளியே தெரிய வரும். சிலருக்கு அறிகுறியே தெரியாது. எனவே, நோய் பாதிப்பு பகுதிகளில் இருந்து வந்தவர்கள் நிச்சயமாக 6 மாதத்துக்கு உடல் உறவை தவிர்க்க வேண்டும் என்று உலக சுகாதார நிறுவனம் கூறி இருக்கிறது.


  6. #2456
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,182

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Electric fans may make elderly feel hotter, not colder: Study

    While electric fans keep young adults cooler by increasing the evaporation of sweat, they may, surprisingly, have the opposite effect for those above the age of 60, suggests new research.

    The heart rate and internal temperature of seniors exposed to 41.6 degree Celsius temperatures and increasing humidity levels climbed even higher when they tried to cool off with fans -- instead of falling as expected, according to study findings reported in the journal JAMA.

    "Although differences were small, the cumulative effect could become clinically important during prolonged heat exposure, such as during extreme heat waves," said Craig Crandall, Professor of Internal Medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in the US.

    "We know that fans keep young adults cooler by increasing the evaporation of sweat," Crandall said.

    "We surmise that age-related impairments in sweating capacity make fans an ineffective means of cooling for the elderly during exceptionally hot days, and may, in fact, increase thermal and cardiac strain," Crandall noted.

    Researchers studied the physiological responses of a small group of elderly patients in a high-heat, high-humidity environment.

    Participants between the ages of 60 and 80 were observed for approximately two hours in a room with the temperature set at a sweltering 41.6 degrees Celsius and a humidity level that was gradually increased from 30 per cent to 70 per cent.
    Not surprisingly, both heart rate and internal body temperature rose as the humidity level in the room rose.


    The eight individuals in the study were tested under those conditions without a fan and, on a separate occasion, with an electric fan.


    Unexpectedly, the participants' heart rates were 10 beats per minute higher and their internal temperatures marginally higher when a fan was part of the experimental environment.


    Although these findings suggest that fan use may be counterproductive for seniors during heat waves, the investigators propose that fan use may still be beneficial under less extreme environmental conditions, though this needs to be confirmed.


  7. #2457
    vijaykumar12's Avatar
    vijaykumar12 is offline Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Male
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    India
    Posts
    12,558

    Re: Health Bulletin

    40 வயதாகும் பெண்களுக்கான பரிசோதனைகள்!

    பெண்களுக்கு தைராய்டு, கர்ப்பப்பைவாய் புற்றுநோய், எலும்பு பலவீனம்,மார்பக புற்றுநோய் ஆகிய பாதிப்புகள் அதிகம் வரும். அதைத் தடுக்க அதற்குரிய பரிசோதனைகளை முதலில் செய்வது நல்லது. 40-வயதிற்கு மேற்பட்ட பெண்களுக்கு தைராய்டு, கர்ப்பப்பை புற்றுநோய், எலும்பு பலவீனம், மார்பக புற்றுநோய் அதிகம் தாக்கும் வாய்ப்புள்ளது. இதை முன்கூட்டியே உரிய பரிசோதனைகள் மூலம் கண்டறிந்தால், பாதிப்புகளை தடுக்கலாம்.


  8. #2458
    vijaykumar12's Avatar
    vijaykumar12 is offline Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Male
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    India
    Posts
    12,558

    Re: Health Bulletin

    இந்தியாவில் வருடத்திற்கு 2.5%மக்கள் கேன்சரால் பாதிப்பு!

    டெல்லி, கேரளா, கொல்கத்தா மற்றும் புனே போன்ற மாநிலங்களில் உள்ள மக்களில், ஒரு வருடத்திற்கு சுமார் 2.5% க்கும் மேற்பட்டோர் கேன்சரால் பாதிக்கப்பட்டு வருகின்றனர் என்கிறது சமீபத்திய மெடிக்கல் ரிப்போர்ட் ஒன்று. உலக அளவில் கேன்சரால் பாதிக்கப்பட்டோரின் எண்ணிக்கு 1.7 மில்லியன் ஆகும். இதில் இந்தியாவில் மட்டும் 2,88,000 மக்கள் கேன்சரால் பாதிக்கப்பட்டுள்ளனர் என்கிறது இந்த ரிப்போர்ட்.


  9. #2459
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,182

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Stimulating neurons could protect against brain damage

    A breakthrough in understanding how brain damage spreads and how it could be controlled has been discovered by UK scientists.

    Collaboration between neuroscientists and engineers at the Universities of Strathclyde and Dundee in the UK have uncovered a previously unknown mechanism in the brain that allows networks of neurons to protect against the spreading secondary damage seen in cases of strokes and traumatic brain injuries.

    Dr Michele Zagnoni, Senior Lecturer in Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the University of Strathclyde, was a partner in the research.

    "Using microfluidic technology, we were able to produce in-vitro neuronal networks to investigate spreading toxicity in the brain, which is the cause of brain damage even after an initial trauma.

    "Through this process, we were able to demonstrate how the spread of this toxicity is driven. In doing that we also uncovered a previously unknown, fast acting, neuroprotective signalling mechanism," he said.

    "This mechanism utilises the innate capacity of the surrounding neuronal networks, grown in the laboratory, to provide protection against the spreading toxicity.

    "By stimulating that network, then theoretically we could limit the spread of brain damage. That requires further work, but it is an exciting and important possibility."

    "If this network activity could be triggered clinically as soon as possible then major brain damage could be minimised and recovery periods shortened," said Dr Christopher Connolly, Reader in Neurobiology in Dundee's School of Medicine.

    "Although this is basic laboratory research, it does now re-open the door to the possibility of stopping ongoing brain damage.

    "Slow acting neuroprotection is well known but approaches to induce protection require at least 24 hours notice to be effective. This is of no practical use in a clinical emergency situation such as a stroke or traumatic brain injury, so current treatment options are limited to aiding the recovery processes.


    "We have identified that neuronal networks react to an insult by sending rapid - in minutes - warning signals in an attempt to protect against the toxicity that causes brain damage.


    "Where we can't protect neurons quickly, we can recruit the help of surrounding neurons to do this for us. It is a case of 'If you need a job done quickly, ask the expert' and in this instance the experts are the neurons themselves."


    "This is something we certainly need to test further but it does suggest the possibility of an effective and immediate pharmacological treatment for stroke," said Dr Connolly.


    The results of the research are published in the journal Scientific Reports.


  10. #2460
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    97,182

    Re: Health Bulletin

    Migraine: Is it really all in the mind?

    Migraine sufferers were taken seriously in the Middle Ages, so why are symptoms now readily dismissed? Katherine Foxhall delves into the history of the crushing headaches

    Have you ever experienced a migraine? If so, perhaps you recognise this: It feels as if there is hammering and pounding in the head. Sound or talking is unbearable, as is light or glare. The pain arises from hot, choleric fumes, together with windiness. And so one feels piercing, burning and ringing.

    Such a precise explanation of the pain and disorientation experienced during a migraine might have been written yesterday. In fact, it comes from an encyclopedia, compiled by the Franciscan monk Bartholomaeus Anglicus (Bartholomew the Englishman), in the 13th century. There aren't many ailments that have maintained so clear a course over so many centuries. And what's more, looking at the history of migraines reveals that the ailment was actually taken more seriously in the past, something we can learn a lot from today.

    We can pinpoint the beginning of the history of migraine as a named disorder to Galen, the most famous philosopher and physician in the Roman Empire. Galen set migraine, or hemicrania as he termed it, apart from other types of headache: as a painful disorder affecting only half the head, caused by the ascent of vapours from the stomach that were excessive, too hot, or too cold.

    The 12th-century text of Causae et Curae, which scholars generally accept as the work of the the celebrated German abbess Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179), gave a compelling explanation of why migraine seized only half the brain at a time: this was a bodily force so powerful, that if it seized the whole head, the pain would be unendurable.

    Although Galen's writings were lost with the fall of the Roman Empire, Galen's term, hemicrania, persisted, being adapted and adopted into various languages over the centuries. For example, in Middle English, we find emigranea and in medieval Wales the term migran. William Dunbar, writing in Middle Scots, used the term magryme in his poem describing the physical pain of migraine as being like an arrow piercing his brow, a pain so bad that he couldn't look at the light. Dunbar also captured the migraine aftermath, the "postdrome" that came with the new morning, when he sat down to write but was unable to find any words. His head "dulled in dullness", his body was unrefreshed, his spirit asleep.

    Throughout the 16th and 17th centuries, a wealth of remedies in manuscript and printed recipe collections suggest a sophisticated general knowledge about this disorder. For example, Jane Jackson's recipe book, dating from 1642, gives six separate recipes for "Migrim in the Head", requiring various amounts of effort to produce. The simpler remedies could be made in a few minutes from common garden ingredients (mix houseleek and earthworms with flour, spread it on a cloth and bind to the forehead), but the most complex concoction required equipment, planning and financial outlay to produce a medicine that would last 20 years. As well as taking migraine seriously, Jackson's recipe book suggests that people of the 17th century appreciated that migraine could occur on a spectrum, from the occasional acute attack to a chronic illness that could last for several days.

    These historical descriptions of migraine reveal that we have lost something. In all of the sources from the medieval and early modern period that I have come across during the five years I have spent tracing the history of migraine, one thing is clear: these people took migraine seriously.

    This is important. Migraine is now accepted as a "real" disorder which affects around one in seven people, two-thirds of whom are women, and is recognised by the WHO as the sixth highest cause worldwide of years lost due to disability. But despite this, it (along with other headache disorders) is nevertheless chronically under-funded, its sufferers often ignored, dismissed or blamed, and their ailments under-diagnosed and under-treated. In her recent book Not Tonight, the sociologist Joanna Kempner has described this situation as migraine's "legitimacy deficit".

    So what has happened? Historical sources suggest that the question we need to ask is not how we can begin to give migraine the legitimacy it needs, but when and why we stopped taking it seriously in the first place. Over the course of the 18th century, something changed, as migraine became the stuff of ridicule. In May 1782, for instance, a flamboyant character graced the King's Theatre Masquerade in London, and introduced himself to the gathering as "Le Sieur Francois de Migraine, Docteur en Medicine". And in the summer heat of August 1787, the General Evening Post described how "half Paris had the migraine, and no lady of fashion could be prevailed upon to quit her boudoir". Migraine was becoming something to joke about, a complaint that affected a particular kind of person, usually female.

    By the 19th century, physicians routinely talked of young female "martyrs", and of sick headache and megrim as a disorder of "mothers in the lower classes of life" whose minds and bodies had been weakened by daily toil, disturbed sleep, insufficient nourishment and constant lactation.


    During the 1980s, many migraine sufferers took the opportunity to share their experiences of migraine by entering four international art competitions. The resulting collection, which includes over 500 pieces, reveals the powerful effect migraine has on people's lives. Perhaps most striking is the frequency with which motifs such as arrows, hammering, pounding, light, glare and disorientation appear in this art — seemingly as familiar to sufferers today as they were to the medieval poets and physicians who discussed this disorder nearly 1,000 years ago.

    For the first time, this collection is the subject of a dedicated website, which has now been launched by the charity Migraine Action as part of Migraine Awareness Week. These paintings, backing up a thousand years of historical sources, make it clear that migraine is more than just a headache. It needs to be taken as seriously now as it was by Galen.


    This article was first published in The Conversation (theconversation.com). Katherine Foxhall is a lecturer in history at the University of Leicester


loading...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Like It?
Share It!







Follow Penmai on Twitter