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Health Bulletin


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  1. #241
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Model heart helps doctors perfect cure

    What stress do the heart's tissues undergo when it contracts? How much does it deform? Two engineers from IT major Infosys Technologies have developed a three-dimensional model of the human heart to enable doctors understand the vital organ better.

    The model simulates the heart's functioning, in particular the deformation and stress induced on its tissues due to systolic (contraction) and diastolic (relaxation) pressures. It's aimed at helping medical professionals improve their understanding of the cardio-mechanics of the heart and to perform quick studies on various parameters influencing the heart.

    Anirudha Ambulgekar, engineering analyst, and Dattatraya Parle, principal consultant, are from the biomedical engineering division. "With heart diseases emerging as the No. 1 killer in India, our aim was to provide a near real-life scenario to improve understanding of the complexities of heart disorders. We used finite element analysis, computer aided design and engineering techniques. The objective was to understand the stress and deformation pattern within tissues subjected to pressure loads using mechanical engineering concepts and tools,'' they told TOI.

    Parle, earlier a scientist at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, said: "The challenge in developing the model was the need for a combination of anatomical and medical knowledge along with engineering expertise. We collaborated with radiologists and medical experts to understand the heart's functioning, medical imaging and 3D model generation.''

    Cardiologists said engineering analysis of the heart helps better understanding of cardio-mechanics. "The work will help medical device manufacturers to virtually test and validate implants, to detect and correct anomalies quickly and evaluate different solutions,'' they said.


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  2. #242
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    interesting,,,,,,, good!!

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  3. #243
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    hi yamunan,
    thanks.
    how are you ?

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  4. #244
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Barefoot running may not be best: Study

    Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst recruited 37 experienced runners, 19 of whom were habitual heelstrikers and 18 of whom landed first near the front of the foot. (Heel striking is far more common than forefoot striking among modern runners, by most estimates, with at least 70% of us nowadays leading with our heels.)

    The researchers began by outfitting all of the volunteers with the same neutral running flats and then having each run on a treadmill as he or she normally would, using his or her preferred foot strike. The volunteers ran at three different speeds, equivalent to an easy, middling and fast pace. Throughout, the researchers measured oxygen uptake, heart rates and, through mathematical calculations, the extent to which carbohydrates were providing energy.

    Then, in a separate experiment, they asked each runner to switch styles — the heel-strikers were to land near the balls of their feet and the forefoot strikers with their heels — while the researchers gathered the same data as before.

    In the end, this data showed that heel-striking was the more physiologically economical running form, by a considerable margin. Heel strikers used less oxygen to run at the same pace as forefoot strikers, and many of the forefoot strikers used less oxygen — meaning they were more economical — when they switched form to land first with their heels.

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  5. #245
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Youngsters consuming soft drinks suffer more from diabetes and heart strokes

    Young people consuming more than one can of soft drink daily are more likely to suffer from type 2 diabetes, heart disease or a stroke, a new study has claimed.

    The health of 1400 teenagers was followed by The Telethon Institute for Child Health Research in Perth, as part of its ongoing long-term Raine Study into children's health.

    The new results showed that drinking more than one can of fizzy, sugary drink resulted in lower levels of good cholesterol and higher levels of bad triglyceride in the blood, regardless of whether the people consuming it were overweight.

    Researchers said that these teenagers were at higher risk of cardio metabolic disease later in life.

    The Raine Study began in 1989 when 2900 pregnant women were recruited, and their kid's health has been assessed from birth. The study has been published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

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  6. #246
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    New pill to battle 'Delhi Belly' developed

    Scientists have developed a pill to prevent Delhi belly - a condition that causes cramps, vomiting and diarrhoea due to intake of contaminated food and water - in those travelling to India and other tropical countries.

    Researchers at the University of Cambridge have produced a new vaccine that can be swallowed by travellers to help them fight the bacteria that causes the illness.

    Delhi belly, or traveller's tummy, affects an estimated 10 million people each year and up to half of all international travellers suffer from it in some form. It is most common in India and other tropical countries, The Telegraph reported.

    The new pill targets one of the main causes of the disease - enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. It will also offer protection against another travellers' disease - typhoid.

    Professor Nigel Slater, who has led the work at the University of Cambridge's department of chemical engineering and biotechnology, said they were planning to start clinical trials of the vaccine later this year.

    "The vaccine we have produced is a powder so it is very stable and does not need to be kept in cold storage or carries any of the problems associated with needles," he said.

    "It is currently targeting two main bacteria the E coli that causes Delhi belly and Salmonella that causes typhoid.

    "If you were going away for a holiday or on business to India or another country where these diseases are known you would just need to swallow a capsule," he said.

    The scientists have found that they can introduce a small segment of DNA into harmless Salmonella bacteria so they look like enterotoxigenic E coli to the immune system.

    These bacteria can be grown in vessels to form a kind of slurry that can then be spray dried with hot gas to turn it into a powder.

    This leaves the bacteria in suspended animation until it is dehydrated in the stomach after being swallowed by the patient.

    To help protect the bacteria from the destructive acid and bile in the digestive system, it is mixed with a powdered resin similar to polystyrene and placed inside a gelatin pill capsule.

    The resin absorbs the bile, allowing the bacteria to be rehydrated so it can then pass through the lining of the small intestine and induce an immune response.

    "As we are creating immunity at the site where an infection from enterotoxigenic E coli would normally first occur - in the digestive system - it allows the immune system to be primed against it at the first line of defence," Slater said.

    "This should make it more effective than traditional vaccines. We have had some promising results in trials in animals and we are now aiming to start clinical trials in humans later this year," he said.

    The scientists, who are working with a drug company Prokarium to develop the vaccine, also hope to produce vaccines against other bacteria including Clostridium difficile.

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  7. #247
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Interesting information you have shared. thank you Vijigermany


  8. #248
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Hi Sumitra ,
    most welcome


  9. #249
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Researchers optimistic radioactive lead can beat cancer

    Atomic medicine has "fantastic potential" for fighting deadly, difficult to treat cancers, the head of French nuclear giant Areva's medical said. "We are interested in tumours against which the current therapeutic arsenal is very limited – like ovarian, gastric and pancreatic cancers – where the needs are huge and patients are waiting," explained Areva Med chief Patrick Bourdet.

    Based in a Maryland suburb of the US capital, not far from the National Institutes of Health, Areva Med is pitting its hopes on a rare radioactive isotope that may be capable of selectively annihilating cancer cells. This new weapon against these aggressive cancers is a variety of lead: the isotope Pb 212. It is extremely rare, extracted from an equally rare metal called thorium.

    Only the few major nuclear powers have stocks of the radioactive metal – France, being one of them, with a considerable cache, Bourdet said. France's stock can be traced back half a decade to its nuclear subsidiary. At that time, the Commissary of Atomic Energy, or CEA, a government-funded research group, decided to hold on to thorium after it extracted uranium – which has become the principal material used in nuclear power plants.
    In 2003, researchers had the idea of extracting the isotope Pb 212 from the thorium, with Areva's scientists among them, looking in part for possible applications against cancer. Convinced of the great medical potential of this isotope, Areva created its medical affiliate in 2009 in the United States, which, since then, hasn't stopped growing.


  10. #250
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Discovery may lead to new treatments for jaundice

    Scientists have discovered how a liver enzyme protects cells from damage caused by jaundice, a find that may lead to development of new treatments for the condition. University of Guelph researchers in Canada believe the discovery may ultimately lead to an alternative treatment for jaundice, such as a new drug or supplement.

    Almost two out of three newborns contract jaundice, with its telltale skin yellowing. Normal treatment involves use of ultraviolet light but it doesn't always work. Although the condition is usually benign, severe cases can cause permanent brain damage and lead to cerebral palsy and hearing loss.
    Jaundice can also affect people with liver disease or increased breakdown of red blood cells, as in malaria. In all cases, a substance called bilirubin collects in the blood. High amounts can be toxic and can cause permanent brain damage, said Gordon Kirby, co-author of the study.

    Previous research had found a naturally occurring enzyme that breaks down bilirubin. Called cytochrome P450 2A5, the enzyme is known to increase in people with liver ailments. The Guelph team has shown that more bilirubin in the blood activates the gene to make this enzyme. The enzyme helps remove bilirubin and prevents liver cells from dying, said Kirby. The researchers used cultured liver cells from mice for their study.

    Scientists need to determine safe and effective levels of the enzyme before developing any treatment, said Kirby. "We need to fine-tune our ability to manipulate this enzyme and fully understand its role in bilirubin removal," he said. The study was published in the journal Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology.


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