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Health Bulletin


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  1. #251
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Vegetable fats can help men with prostate cancer

    Men with prostate cancer may significantly improve their survival chances with a simple change in their diet, a new study has revealed.

    The study conducted by UC San Francisco has found that by substituting healthy vegetable fats, such as olive and canola oils, nuts, seeds and avocados, for animal fats and carbohydrates, men with the disease had a markedly lower risk of developing lethal prostate cancer and dying from other causes.

    Lead author Erin L. Richman, ScD, a post-doctoral scholar in the UCSF Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, said that consumption of healthy oils and nuts increases plasma antioxidants and reduces insulin and inflammation, which may deter prostate cancer progression.

    The new study analyzed intake of saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and trans fats as well as fats from animal and vegetable sources.

    The data were derived from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, which began in 1986 and is sponsored by the Harvard School of Public Health and is funded by the National Cancer Institute.

    The fat intake study involved 4,577 men who had been diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer between 1986 and 2010.

    The authors uncovered a striking benefit that men, who replaced 10 per cent of their total daily calories from carbohydrates with healthy vegetable fats had a 29 per cent lower risk of developing lethal prostate cancer and a 26 per cent lower risk of dying from all causes.

    Adding a single serving of oil-based dressing a day -one tablespoon- was associated with a 29 per cent lower risk of lethal prostate cancer and a 13 per cent lower risk of death, the authors found.

    It was also found that adding one serving of nuts a day -one ounce- was associated with an 18 per cent lower risk of lethal prostate cancer and an 11 per cent lower risk of death.

    The study adjusted for factors such as age, types of medical treatment, body mass index, smoking, exercise and other dietary factors, elevated blood pressure, cholesterol at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis and other health conditions.


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  2. #252
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Risk factors for suicide revealed

    A collaborative study between Lund University in Sweden and Stanford University has revealed that the rate of suicide among men is almost three times that of women.

    It also found that being young, single and having a low level of education were stronger risk factors for suicide among men, while mental illness was a stronger risk factor among women.

    Unemployment was the strongest social risk factor among women, whereas being single was the strongest among men.

    Because the study covered a range of different diseases in both in-patient and out-patient care as well as social factors, the researchers gained insight into which factors are particularly important to bear in mind when assessing the risk of suicide.

    "Better strategies are needed for collaboration between different disciplines and wider society in order to reduce the risk of suicide for individuals who suffer from, for example, depression, anxiety, COPD, asthma and certain social risk factors", said principal investigator Professor Jan Sundquist.


  3. #253
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Oz rainforest fruit may cure cancer

    A life science company is perfecting a possible miracle cure for cancer from a fruit from the north Queensland rainforest.

    QBiotics based in Queensland believes that a compound extracted from the same fruit of the native blushwood may also help cure chronic wounds, the Courier Mail reported.

    The company's chief executive Dr Victoria Gordon said that the anti-cancer drug found in the 130 million year old rainforest was unique.

    She said that their anti-cancer and wound healing products act as signalling molecules that turn on body's immune system to attack the tumour or accelerate the natural wound healing process.

    She said that products had successfully treated solid cancer tumours in more than 300 dogs, cats and horses.


  4. #254
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Inflatable leg wraps save lives after stroke

    Cheap inflatable leg wraps may save the lives of patients after a stroke, researchers in Scotland have found.

    The devices regularly squeeze the legs to keep blood flowing and prevent formation of fatal blood clots, the BBC reported.

    A trial with 2,876 patients showed there were fewer clots with the wraps.

    The Stroke Association said the results were "extremely encouraging" and had the potential to save thousands of lives.

    A clot in the leg, a deep vein thrombosis, is normally associated with long flights, but is a problem for hospital patients unable to move.

    Around 60,000 people a year in the UK are immobile when admitted to hospital after a stroke.

    Doctors at Western General Hospital and the University of Edinburgh said compression socks did not improve survival and clot-busting drugs led to other problems, including bleeding on the brain.

    They tested the devices, which fit around the legs and fill with air every minute. They compress the legs and force the blood back to the heart.

    They were worn for a month or until the patient recovered and was able to move again.

    The study is published in the journal Lancet.


  5. #255
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Stressed dads can affect offspring's brain development

    Dads-to-be, please note! Stress felt by the father - whether as a preadolescent or adult - leaves a lasting impression on his sperm that can affect his offspring's brain development, a new study has found.

    The findings by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, point to a never-before-seen epigenetic link to stress-related diseases such as anxiety and depression passed from father to child.

    While environmental challenges, like diet, drug abuse, and chronic stress, felt by mothers during pregnancy have been shown to affect offspring neurodevelopment and increase the risk for certain diseases, dad's influence on his children are less well understoodv.

    The team of researchers led by Tracy L Bale, associate professor of neuroscience in the Perelman School of medicine department of Psychiatry and the School of Veterinary Medicine Department of Animal Biology have shown that stress on preadolescent and adult male mice induced an epigenetic mark in their sperm that reprogrammed their offspring's hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a region of the brain that governs responses to stress.

    Surprisingly, both male and female offspring had abnormally low reactivity to stress.

    This stress pathway dysregulation - when reactivity is either heightened or reduced - is a sign that an organism doesn't have the ability to respond appropriately to a changing environment.

    And as a result, their stress response becomes irregular, which can lead to stress-related disorders.

    "It didn't matter if dads were going through puberty or in adulthood when stressed before they mated. We've shown here for the first time that stress can produce long-term changes to sperm that reprogramme the offspring HPA stress axis regulation," said Bale.

    "These findings suggest one way in which paternal-stress exposure may be linked to such neuropsychiatric diseases," Bale said.

    In the study, male mice were exposed to six weeks of chronic stress, before breeding, either throughout puberty or only in adulthood.

    Researchers found that offspring from paternal stress groups displayed significantly blunted levels of the stress hormone corticosterone - in humans, it is cortisol - in response to stress.

    The authors pointed out that a reduced physiological stress response may reflect some adaptive evolutionary benefit passed on to offspring to ensure survival in what is expected to be a more stressful environment.

    The findings were published in the Journal of Neuroscience.


  6. #256
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Research shows canola oil food for health

    A comprehensive review of scientific evidence shows that consuming canola oil instead of other fat sources enhances health and can help consumers comply with dietary recommendations. Studies conducted over the past 25 years about the health effects of canola oil, analyzed in the June 2013 peer-reviewed journal Nutrition Reviews, confirm canola oil reduces the risk of heart disease.

    "The objective of this review was to examine the health benefits of canola oil as a dietary component itself, rather than focus on the effects of individual types of fat in the oil," says Peter Jones, lead researcher and director of the Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals at the University of Manitoba. "This approach results in practical advice to consumers about including canola oil in the diet."

    The review titled 'Evidence of Health Benefits of Canola Oil,' looked at the effects of canola oil consumption on cholesterol, heart disease, inflammation, insulin sensitivity, oxidation of LDL (bad) cholesterol, energy metabolism and cancer. A total of 270 studies were evaluated of which 40 were considered directly relevant to the review.

    Data revealed that canola oil consumption substantially reduces total and LDL cholesterol levels and improves insulin sensitivity when used in place of saturated fat as well as increases levels of tocopherol (vitamin E) compared with other dietary fat sources. It also showed that with 61% monounsaturated fat, canola oil may prevent the oxidation of LDL cholesterol.

    "Canola oil can now be regarded as one of the healthiest edible vegetable oils in terms of its biological functions and its ability to improve health and aid in reducing disease-related risk factors," says Jones. "Current research is expected to provide more complete evidence to support the health-promoting effects of canola oil when consumed at levels consistent with dietary guidelines."

    The scientific literature review was conducted by the Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals at the University of Manitoba. It was equally funded by the Canola Council of Canada and US Canola Association.


  7. #257
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    A hot cup of cocoa can help obese people fight diabetes

    A new study has revealed that a few cups of hot cocoa may not only fight off the chill of a winter's day, but they could also help obese people in better control inflammation-related diseases, such as diabetes.

    Mice that were fed cocoa with a high-fat diet experienced less obesity-related inflammation than mice fed the same high-fat diet without the supplement, Joshua Lambert, associate professor of food science, said.

    The mice ate the human equivalent of 10 tablespoons of cocoa powder, i.e., about four or five cups of hot cocoa, during a 10 week period.

    "What surprised me was the magnitude of the effect. There wasn't as big of an effect on the body weight as we expected, but I was surprised at the dramatic reduction of inflammation and fatty liver disease," Lambert said.

    The researchers reported that several indicators of inflammation and diabetes in the mice that were fed the cocoa supplement were much lower than the mice that were fed the high-fat diet without the cocoa powder and almost identical to the ones found that were fed a low-fat diet in the control group.

    For example, they had about 27 percent lower plasma insulin levels than the mice that were not fed cocoa. High levels of insulin can signal that a patient has diabetes.

    The cocoa powder supplement also reduced the levels of liver triglycerides in mice by a little more than 32 percent, according to Lambert, who worked with Yeyi Gu, graduate student in food science, and Shan Yu, a graduate student in physiology. Elevated triglyceride levels are a sign of fatty liver disease and are related to inflammation and diabetes.

    The mice also saw a slight but significant drop in the rate of body weight gain, according to the researchers. The findings are published online in the European Journal of Nutrition


  8. #258
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Needles out: Now, a patch to deliver vaccines

    A scientist has created a patch — dubbed the Nanaopatch — which can be made for less than a dollar and can deliver vaccinations without any injections.


    Mark Kendall said at the TEDGlobal event in Edinburgh on Thursday that he hopes that the Nanopatch, which uses only a hundredth of the vaccine dose delivered by syringes, will be used in the developing world. He said that with the help of his creation, the price of a vaccine that costs $10 can be brought down to just 10 cents.

    The patch substitutes the single point of an injection for thousands of tiny projections perforating the skin. Unlike traditional vaccines that are liquid and must be kept refrigerated when in storage, the novel patch can be kept at 23 degree Celsius for a year.

    The patch has been tested to administer flu vaccines at Queensland University. Tests will soon start in Papua New Guinea to help treat the human papilloma virus that causes cervical cancer.


  9. #259
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Needles out: Now, a patch to deliver vaccines

    A scientist has created a patch dubbed the Nanaopatch which can be made for less than a dollar and can deliver vaccinations without any injections.


    Mark Kendall said at the TEDGlobal event in Edinburgh on Thursday that he hopes that the Nanopatch, which uses only a hundredth of the vaccine dose delivered by syringes, will be used in the developing world. He said that with the help of his creation, the price of a vaccine that costs $10 can be brought down to just 10 cents.

    The patch substitutes the single point of an injection for thousands of tiny projections perforating the skin. Unlike traditional vaccines that are liquid and must be kept refrigerated when in storage, the novel patch can be kept at 23 degree Celsius for a year.

    The patch has been tested to administer flu vaccines at Queensland University. Tests will soon start in Papua New Guinea to help treat the human papilloma virus that causes cervical cancer.


  10. #260
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    New method ‘sniffs out’ killer form of skin cancer

    Odours from human skin cells can be used to identify melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, a new study has found. The researchers , who are from the Monell Center in the United States and collaborating institutions, also demonstrated that a nanotechnology-based sensor could reliably differentiate melanoma cells from normal skin cells.


    The findings suggest that non-invasive odour analysis may be a valuable technique in the detection and early diagnosis of human melanoma.

    Current detection methods for melanoma most commonly rely on visual inspection of the skin, which is highly dependent on individual self-examination and clinical skill.

    The study took advantage of the fact that human skin produces numerous airborne chemical molecules known as volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, many of which are odorous. The researchers used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques to analyze the compounds and identified different profiles of VOCs.


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