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Health Bulletin


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  1. #311
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Stem-cell therapy wipes out HIV in 2 patients

    Two HIV-positive patients in the US who underwent bone marrow transplants for cancer have stopped anti-retroviral therapy and still show no detectable sign of the HIV virus, researchers said on Wednesday.

    The Harvard University researchers stressed it was too early to say the men have been cured, but said it was an encouraging sign that the virus hasn't rebounded in their blood months after drug treatment ended.

    The first person reported to be cured of HIV, American Timothy Ray Brown, underwent a stem cell transplant in 2007 to treat his leukemia. He was reported by his German doctors to have been cured of HIV two years later.

    Brown's doctors used a donor who had a rare genetic mutation that provides resistance against HIV. So far, no one has observed similar results using ordinary donor cells such as those given to the two patients by the Harvard University researchers.

    The researchers, Timothy Henrich and Daniel Kuritzkes of the Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, announced last year that blood samples taken from the men who both had blood cancers showed no traces of the HIV virus eight months after they received bone marrow transplants to replace cancerous blood cells with healthy donor cells. The men were still on anti-HIV drugs at the time.

    The men have both since stopped anti-retroviral therapy one 15 weeks ago and the other seven weeks ago and show no signs of the virus, Henrich told an international AIDS conference in Malaysia on Wednesday. "They are doing very well," Henrich said. "While these results are exciting, they do not yet indicate that the men have been cured. Only time will tell."

    The HIV virus may be hiding in other organs such as the liver, spleen or brain and could return months later, he warned.

    Further testing of the men's cells, plasma and tissue for at least a year will help give a clearer picture on the full impact of the transplant on HIV persistence, he said. Kuritzkes said the patients will be put back on the drugs if there is a viral rebound.


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  2. #312
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    New antibiotic against bacterial diseases on cards

    Australian researchers are developing a new antibiotic that may be effective against a wide range of bacterial diseases including Tuberculosis.

    The existing antibiotics target only the bacterial cell membranes but this potential new antibiotic may be operated as a protein inhibitor which binds to an enzyme critical for metabolic processes, interrupting the life cycle of the bacteria.

    According to The Advertiser daily report, Andrew Abell, the University of Adelaide's acting head of the School of Chemistry and Physics, said the new compound operates differently to existing antibiotics.

    The new compound was in the very early stages of development and had not yet been tested in animals, Abell said, adding that it had the potential to become the first of a new class of antibiotics which could help in the fight against antibiotic resistant strains of bacterial diseases.

    "Bacteria quickly build resistance against the known classes of antibiotics and this is causing a significant global health problem," Abell said.

    The new antibiotic could be used to beat bacterial resistance, said the scientist.

    "Preliminary results show that this new class of compound may be effective against a wide range of bacterial diseases including Tuberculosis which has developed a strain resistant to all known antibiotics," Abell said.

    He has been working on the project with researchers at the Women's and Children's Hospital and Monash University.

    The results so far had been promising, but the next step was to test the compound in animal models, said Abell.

    The research has been published in the journal Chemical Science.

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  3. #313
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Doctors say too many aspirin can cause gut bleeding

    Popping aspirin without a prescription could be the reason for a series of disorders, said doctors at a programme in which health minister K C Veeramani inaugurated the centre for gastrointestinal bleeding at Fortis Malar Hospital on Wednesday.

    GI bleeding refers to hemorrhaging in the gastrointestinal tract which includes esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine , colon, rectum or anus. Detailing the symptoms, consultant interventional gastroenterologist Dr R Ravi said that it manifests itself as either vomiting of blood or passing blood in bowel motions.

    Interventional gastroenterologist Dr Basumani said that GI bleeding is a common medical emergency that claimed thousands of lives every year in Tamil Nadu and research showed that a dedicated centre can reduce the death rate by more than 50%. "Studies have revealed that as many as 7,000 people in Chennai suffer from GI bleeding every year and 20% of the cases are fatal. Technically, GI bleeding claims more lives than heart attack every year," he said.

    Medical experts warned people against indiscriminate intake of aspirin as it could cause blood thinning. "Multiple drug consumption can prevent ailments but it stops natural clotting of blood. This kind of bleeding would reduce the platelet count and sometimes precipitate a heart attack ," said Dr Basumani.

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  4. #314
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    What your smile reveals about you

    When you meet someone new within seconds, your subconscious makes an assessment of that person based on various factors, one of which is the size and shape of a person's teeth.

    Cosmetic dentist Dr Christian Coachman said that the studies have shown that it is virtually instantaneous and before the info reaches the visual cortex in brain, people subconsciously make a list of conclusions about them and then respond accordingly.

    According to cosmetic dentists, models, film stars and even politicians take help of their smile to shape their public image, which is the reason why many undergo cosmetic procedures to give them the impression that they want, Stuff.co.nz reported.

    Cosmetic dentist Dr David Dunn said that square teeth give a masculine impression, asserting that Halle Berry's square-shaped teeth can give the impression that she is in control, relatively unemotional and calm, as well as diplomatic, objective and entrepreneurial.

    In comparison oval teeth, signals sadness and pensiveness about life, as well as giving the impression a person is organised, artistic and possibly timid in personality.

    Four personality types are linked with people's teeth: sanguine or dynamic (triangular-shaped), choleric or strong (rectangular-shaped), melancholic or sensitive (oval-shaped) and phlegmatic or peaceful (square-shaped).

    Many people are a combination with a mixed group of different shaped teeth, so they give off a range of messages.

    Sydney psychologist Janine Rod said that if she were to rank all the factors that go into creating a likable personality, she would place a friendly smile at the top of the list.

    She added that a warm, authentic smile communicates feelings that words alone are unable to accomplish.

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  5. #315
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Short walks around office checks diabetes

    A new study suggests that taking a two-minute stroll around the office every half hour could save millions from the misery of diabetes.

    Leaving the desk for a walkabout can have a bigger impact on your health than a brisk 30-minute walk before work, the Daily Express reported.

    Anthony Barnett, Emeritus Professor of Medicine at the Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, said lifestyle changes can significantly reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes, which is reaching epidemic proportions in Britain.

    He said that short bursts of regular exercise in people with sedentary occupations appears to be at least as good as longer, but less frequent, periods of exercise in improving sugar and fat levels.

    Scientists at Otago University in New Zealand found that volunteers who regularly walked for just one minute and 40 seconds had lower blood sugar and insulin levels.

    Raised sugar and insulin readings are warning signs that Type 2 diabetes, a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, could be setting in.

    But the latest findings show that brief walkabouts could be all that is needed to lower the risks.

    The study is published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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  6. #316
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Women can no longer bank upon their 'heart protecting hormone': Experts

    The survey "Visualizing the Extent of heart Disease in Indian women" (VEDNA), intending to map the trends of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in Indian women, revealed that 65% of doctors believe that lack of oestrogen hormone which is due to changing lifestyle and other co-morbid conditions, is among the top five reasons responsible for younger women developing cardiovascular diseases.

    The survey, covering almost 600 health care professionals of metros and non-metro cities from across the country exposed shocking facts around women's heart health in India. The survey found that 54% of cardiologists observed a 16-20% of overall growth rate in cardiovascular diseases among women in the last five years.

    More surprisingly, a whopping 41%of the doctors claimed an alarming 10-15% growth rate in cardiovascular diseases among the age group of 20-40 years, the category of women which was earlier considered 'protected' from heart ailments.

    Contrary to conventional pharmacological belief that 'pre-menstrual women are completely safe from heart ailments,' almost all doctors cited that, even the menstruating population is falling prey to cardiovascular diseases.

    "Quite contrary to conventional medical ideology that due to oestrogen hormone 'women, especially menstruating ones, are safe from heart diseases,' lately, there has been a colossal rise in number of female cardiovascular patients. The trend may be attributed to changing lifestyle which is bringing such drastic hormonal changes that heart protecting effect of oestrogen hormone is getting nullified," said Dr Jagdish Parikh, Cardiologist, Nanavati Hospital, Mumbai.

    The survey results revealed that,due to noteworthy changes in lifestyle, not only have the risk factors for the cardiovascular disease, like stress, smoking and drinking increased considerably but co-morbid conditions like obesity, hypertension and diabetes have also gone up.

    The predisposition of Indian women to the 'apple' shaped body and high visceral fat came out as one of the most interesting findings of the survey.

    Among other findings, 83% of the doctors believed that Indian women are ignorant about heart diseases, while 76% observed that women die of heart diseases due to late presentation to the hospital and 66% cited that CVD death amongst women was due to late diagnosis.

    "It is frequently noticed that women often overlook symptoms and discomfort pertaining to heart diseases, and rarely consult an expert. Even if they do opt for expert's consultation, more often than not, they discontinue the treatment as soon as they get symptomatic relief. The compliance rate is comparatively poor among women," said Dr Jagdish Parikh, Cardiologist, Nanavati Hospital.

    The survey also revealed a striking contrast between working and non-working women in terms of awareness and risk factors. While 81% of the doctors believed that working women are more conscious about their heart health, majority of the doctors still noted that heart diseases are on the rise in working women.

    "Considering the fact that working women juggle between home and work responsibilities, they are more likely to get exposed to stress and unhealthy lifestyle and therefore could be more prone to cardiovascular diseases as compared to non-working women", said Dr Nazir I Juvale, Cardiologist, Saifee Hospital, Mumbai, "Nevertheless, due to huge burden of household responsibilities and lack of self care, non-working women cannot be considered to be at lesser risk", he added.

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  7. #317
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    very good information you have shared. thank you

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  8. #318
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Less activity may help you live longer: Study

    A sedentary lifestyle may prolong lifespan, a new study on mice suggests.


    Female mice with a high life expectancy are less active and less explorative. They also eat less than their fellow females with a lower life expectancy, researchers said.

    The study suggests individuals with a greater life expectancy will express reactive personality traits and will be shy, less active and less explorative than individuals with a lower survival expectation, researchers said.

    Behavioural biologists from the University of Zurich reveal that there is a correlation between longevity and personality for female house mice, and a minimum amount of boldness is necessary for them to survive.

    Risky behaviour can lead to premature death — in humans . Anna Lindholm and her doctoral student Yannick Auclair investigated whether this also applies to animals by studying the behaviour of 82 house mice.

    They recorded boldness, activity level, exploration tendency and energy intake of female and male house mice with two different allelic variants on chromosome 17, thereby testing predictions of "lifehistory theory" on how individuals invest optimally in growth and reproduction.


  9. #319
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Less activity may help you live longer: Study

    A sedentary lifestyle may prolong lifespan, a new study on mice suggests.


    Female mice with a high life expectancy are less active and less explorative. They also eat less than their fellow females with a lower life expectancy, researchers said.

    The study suggests individuals with a greater life expectancy will express reactive personality traits and will be shy, less active and less explorative than individuals with a lower survival expectation, researchers said.

    Behavioural biologists from the University of Zurich reveal that there is a correlation between longevity and personality for female house mice, and a minimum amount of boldness is necessary for them to survive.

    Risky behaviour can lead to premature death in humans . Anna Lindholm and her doctoral student Yannick Auclair investigated whether this also applies to animals by studying the behaviour of 82 house mice.

    They recorded boldness, activity level, exploration tendency and energy intake of female and male house mice with two different allelic variants on chromosome 17, thereby testing predictions of "lifehistory theory" on how individuals invest optimally in growth and reproduction.


  10. #320
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Now, nasal spray to get rid of painful dental jabs

    Good news for those who dread a visit to the dentist! Scientists have developed a nasal spray that could do away with painful anaesthetic injections for dental procedures.

    The spray, Kovacaine Mist, was as effective as standard anaesthetics in four out of five patients, according to researchers at the University of Buffalo.

    The product has passed phase two clinical trials in the US, 'The Independent' reported.

    Safety trials with the US Food and Drugs Administration could be complete by the end of the summer and final product approval in the US could be achieved by next year, according to the manufacturer, St Renatus LLC.

    "Patients anxious of the dentist are, in theory, likely to have poorer oral health than those who get regular check-ups," said Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation said.

    "This nasal spray could be a very promising addition to any dental practice," Carter said


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