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Health Bulletin


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  1. #61
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    60-yr-old mystery behind Vel blood group solved

    Researchers have finally uncovered the gene behind a human blood group that has remained a mystery for the past 60 years, a finding that could help make blood safer for hundreds of thousands of people worldwide.

    They showed that a genetic deletion on this gene is responsible for the lack of this blood group in some people.

    It is estimated that one in 5000 people are Vel-negative, and routine blood transfusions for patients with antibodies against Vel can lead to kidney failure and even death.

    With the discovery of the gene behind the Vel blood group, medical scientists can now develop a more reliable DNA test to identify people who lack this group.

    This will reduce the risk of severe, and sometimes life threatening, destruction of the Vel-positive donor red blood cells in patients with antibodies against Vel.

    The genetic basis of nearly all 34 blood group systems has been resolved over the past century, but identification of the underlying gene of the Vel blood group has withstood persistent attempts since it was first identified 60 years ago.

    "This is really exciting as it shows how the power of modern genomics technologies can directly benefit patient care," said Professor Willem Ouwehand, who heads one of the NHS Blood and Transplant research teams at both the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in UK.

    Researchers identified 65 individuals who lacked the Vel blood group by testing the red blood cells from nearly 350,000 donors with antibodies against Vel.


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  2. #62
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Eat this chocolate without any guilt

    You may soon feel a lot less guilty for having bars of dark chocolate. In a breakthrough that could bring an end to the days of you feeling miserable about piling on calories, scientists have successfully managed to halve the fat content of chocolate by replacing cocoa butter and milk fats with fruit juice.

    Discovered by British scientists from the University of Warwick, the new technology would allow manufacture of chocolate with fruit juice, vitamin C, water or diet cola replacing up to 50% of the fat.

    The juice is in the form of micro-bubbles that help chocolate retain the lush, velvety "mouth-feel"—the texture that is firm and snappy to the bite and yet melts in the mouth.

    The process also prevents "sugar bloom," the unappetizing white film that coats the surface of chocolate that has been on the shelf for a while.

    Already renowned as a healthy treat when enjoyed in moderation, chocolate could become even more salubrious if manufacturers embraced new technology for making "fruit-juice-infused chocolate," scientists announced at the American Chemical Society meeting. Stefan A F Bon, who led the research, said "We have established the chemistry that's a starting point for healthier chocolate confectionary. This approach maintains the things that make chocolate 'chocolatey', but with fruit juice instead of fat. Now we're hoping the food industry will take the next steps and use the technology to make tasty, lower-fat chocolate bars and other candy."

    Chocolate's high fat and sugar content is a downside, compared to its high levels of healthful plant-based substances termed antioxidants or flavonoids, Bon explained. A 2-ounce serving of premium dark chocolate may contain 13 grams of fat ? 20% of the total daily fat recommended for a person who eats 2,000 calories per day.

    Much of that fat is the unhealthy saturated variety. Substituting fruit juice or cola also reduces the overall sugar content of the candy.

    Bon's team at the University of Warwick has made chocolate infused with apple, orange and cranberry juice.

    "Fruit-juice-infused candy tastes like an exciting hybrid between traditional chocolate and a chocolate-juice confectionary," he said. "Since the juice is spread out in the chocolate, it doesn't overpower the taste of the chocolate. We believe that the technology adds an interesting twist to the range of chocolate confectionary products available," Bon said.


  3. #63
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Eat this chocolate without any guilt

    You may soon feel a lot less guilty for having bars of dark chocolate. In a breakthrough that could bring an end to the days of you feeling miserable about piling on calories, scientists have successfully managed to halve the fat content of chocolate by replacing cocoa butter and milk fats with fruit juice.

    Discovered by British scientists from the University of Warwick, the new technology would allow manufacture of chocolate with fruit juice, vitamin C, water or diet cola replacing up to 50% of the fat.

    The juice is in the form of micro-bubbles that help chocolate retain the lush, velvety "mouth-feel"—the texture that is firm and snappy to the bite and yet melts in the mouth.

    The process also prevents "sugar bloom," the unappetizing white film that coats the surface of chocolate that has been on the shelf for a while.

    Already renowned as a healthy treat when enjoyed in moderation, chocolate could become even more salubrious if manufacturers embraced new technology for making "fruit-juice-infused chocolate," scientists announced at the American Chemical Society meeting. Stefan A F Bon, who led the research, said "We have established the chemistry that's a starting point for healthier chocolate confectionary. This approach maintains the things that make chocolate 'chocolatey', but with fruit juice instead of fat. Now we're hoping the food industry will take the next steps and use the technology to make tasty, lower-fat chocolate bars and other candy."

    Chocolate's high fat and sugar content is a downside, compared to its high levels of healthful plant-based substances termed antioxidants or flavonoids, Bon explained. A 2-ounce serving of premium dark chocolate may contain 13 grams of fat ? 20% of the total daily fat recommended for a person who eats 2,000 calories per day.

    Much of that fat is the unhealthy saturated variety. Substituting fruit juice or cola also reduces the overall sugar content of the candy.

    Bon's team at the University of Warwick has made chocolate infused with apple, orange and cranberry juice.

    "Fruit-juice-infused candy tastes like an exciting hybrid between traditional chocolate and a chocolate-juice confectionary," he said. "Since the juice is spread out in the chocolate, it doesn't overpower the taste of the chocolate. We believe that the technology adds an interesting twist to the range of chocolate confectionary products available," Bon said.


  4. #64
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    vijigermany,
    This is a good way of giving the current health informations .


  5. #65
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Hi Kumar,
    Good morning.
    Thanks for the feedback .
    nice day to you and your family


  6. #66
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Whiff of rosemary can boost your memory: study

    William Shakespeare was right! Sniffing essential oil of the herb rosemary can increase your memory, according to a new study.

    UK researchers found that essential oil of rosemary boosted healthy adults' ability to remember to perform future tasks and recall past events. Rosemary has long been linked to memory and fidelity, and was used by ancient Egyptians in weddings and funeral rituals.

    English playwright and poet William Shakespeare was aware of its properties. In his play 'Hamlet', Ophelia remarks: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance."

    In the new study, the improvement in participants' memory was unrelated to their mood, suggesting rosemary oil was having a chemical influence which improved their memory, The Telegraph reported.

    Researchers, who will present their findings at the British Psychological Society's annual conference in Harrogate today, said the results could improve the everyday lives of people with age-related memory loss.

    "We wanted to build on our previous research that indicated rosemary aroma improved long-term memory and mental arithmetic," Dr Mark Moss, who led the study, said. "We focused on prospective memory, which involves the ability to remember events that will occur in the future and to remember to complete tasks at particular times this is critical for everyday functioning," Moss said.

    Sixty-six participants were divided into two groups and asked to wait in different rooms, one of which had been scented with rosemary essential oil. The volunteers completed a series of memory tests, which included hiding objects and finding them again at a later stage, or passing a specified object to a researcher at a particular time which had been specified earlier.


  7. #67
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Egg white protein can lower blood pressure: Study
    Here is another reason why you should include eggs in your diet!

    Egg white protein can lower your blood pressure as effectively as low doses of medication, according to a new study.

    "We have evidence from the laboratory that a substance in egg white - it's a peptide, one of the building blocks of proteins - reduces blood pressure about as much as a low dose of Captopril, a high-blood-pressure drug," said study leader Zhipeng Yu, of Jilin University.

    Yu and colleagues from Clemson University, studied a peptide called RVPSL. Scientists previously discovered that the substance, like the family of medications that includes Captopril, Vasotec and Monopril, was an angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor.

    It has a powerful ability to inhibit or block the action of ACE, a substance produced in the body that raises blood pressure.

    They set out to further document RVPSL's effects, using laboratory rats that develop high blood pressure and are stand-ins for humans in such early research on hypertension.

    The results of feeding the substance were positive, showing that RVPSL did not have apparent toxic effects and lowered blood pressure by amounts comparable to low doses of Captopril.

    "Our results support and enhance previous findings on this topic. They were promising enough to move ahead with further research on the effects of the egg white peptide on human health," Yu said.

    Yu noted that the research was done with a version of the peptide that was heated to almost 93 degrees Celsius during preparation - less than the temperatures typically used to cook eggs.

    He cited evidence from other research, however, that egg whites may retain their beneficial effects on blood pressure after cooking.

    Yu believes that egg white peptides, either in eggs or as a supplement, could become useful as an adjunct to high-blood-pressure medication.

    For now, he said people with high blood pressure should consult their health care provider before making any changes.

    The study was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.


  8. #68
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Lazybones? Well, blame your genes for the trait

    Couch potatoes may be genetically predisposed to being lazy, according to a new study. Certain genetic traits may predispose people to being more or less motivated to exercise and remain active, found the study by University of Missouri. Frank Booth, a professor in the MU College of Veterinary Medicine, along with Michael Roberts, were able to selectively breed rats that exhibited traits of either extreme activity or extreme laziness. They said these rats indicate that genetics could play a role in exercise motivation , even in humans.

    "We have shown that it is possible to be genetically predisposed to being lazy," Booth said. "It would be very useful to know if a person is genetically predisposed to having a lack of motivation to exercise , because that could potentially make them more likely to grow obese," he said. Researchers put rats in cages with running wheels and measured how much each rat willingly ran on their wheels during a six-day period . They then bred the top 26 runners with each other and bred the 26 rats that ran the least with each other. They repeated this process through 10 generations and found that the line of running rats chose to run 10 times more than the line of 'lazy' rats. "The important thing we identified in the tests were the genetic differences between the two lines of rats," Roberts said.


  9. #69
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Leukaemia in kids starts in womb

    Scientists have discovered the silent beginnings of leukaemia and it starts way back in the mother's womb. A unique study sequencing the entire genomes of identical twins with leukaemia has identified the first mutations sparking the disease in the mother's womb.

    The research, largely funded by Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research and conducted at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, has uncovered clues to the origins of childhood leukaemia in two pairs of identical twins. Scientists believe these early genetic origins of childhood leukaemia could be ideal targets for new cancer drugs, because they represent mutations present in every single cancer cell, playing a major role in the development of the disease.

    Leukaemia is the most common cancer diagnosed in children , affecting a third of young cancer sufferers. Identical twin children often develop leukaemia at the same time, suggesting shared genetic or environmental factors. Scientists at ICR decided to investigate this link by sequencing the entire 3 billion letter genome of two pairs of identical twins with leukaemia, in order to identify the mutations driving the disease in the womb and after birth.

    Study co-author professor Mel Greaves, an expert of cell biology at ICR, said, "It's unusual in cancer to be able to identify the mutation that kick starts the whole process. Twin children, uniquely, provide an insight into the silent beginnings of leukaemia. One implication of these new findings is that the first or 'founder' mutation might provide an appropriate target for therapy as, unlike all subsequent mutations, it is present in every cancer cell."

    Researchers took genetic samples from two sets of identical twins suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the most common form of leukaemia found in children. They found that a common leukaemia-causing gene called ETV6-RUNX 1, generated in the womb by the exchange of genetic material between chromosomes, was the only significant mutation shared by two of the twins and therefore must have been the critical 'initiating' genetic change leading to their leukaemia.


  10. #70
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Daily walk may help teens kick the butt

    Teenagers may find it easier to quit or cut down on smoking if they increase the number of days they exercise for 20 to 30 minutes, equivalent to a short walk, a new study has found. US researchers found teenagers who increased the days on which they got just 20 minutes of exercise were able to cut down on their smoking. Teenage smokers were more likely to quit altogether if they participated in a smoking cessation/fitness programme.

    "This study adds to evidence suggesting that exercise can help teenagers who are trying to quit smoking," said lead author Kimberly Horn of SPHHS. "Teens who boosted the number of days on which they engaged in at least 20 minutes of exercise were more likely than their peers to resist lighting up a cigarette," she said.


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