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Health Bulletin


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  1. #881
    chitramumbai is offline Commander's of Penmai
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Thank you very much for your .... all in

    formations in Health

    Bulletin viji..



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  2. #882
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    Re: Health Bulletin




  3. #883
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  4. #884
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    To Love oneself is the beginning of a lifelong romance- Oscar Wilde


  5. #885
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Brain of smokers biased against negative images of smoking

    Ever wondered why your smoker friend isn't moved by anti-smoking images? His emotional reactions are altered by years of smoking.

    A study by the University of Montreal showed that smokers' brains are biased against negative images of smoking. "What if the use of a product influenced your perception of it, making you even more susceptible to its positive aspects and altering your understanding of its drawbacks? This is precisely what happens with cigarettes in chronic smokers," said a press release sent by the university.

    Lead author Le-Anh Dinh-Williams said the study noticed a bias depending on how smoking was portrayed. "For example, the brains of the smokers in our study were more aroused by images that showed smoking in a positive light than by images that encouraged them to stop. They were also more affected by aversive non-smoking related images than by images of the specific negative consequences of smoking," said the researcher.

    Smoking is an addictive habit, mainly due to the presence of nicotine. It is also a leading cause for cancer—smokers have 3 to 9 times greater risk of developing cancer, lung or heart problem. Studies have shown that 70% to 95% of the smokers who quit their bad habit will start smoking within a year. The Montreal team decided to find out why, despite realising the negative impact of tobacco, smokers continue to light up.

    The researchers feel cigarettes 'trick' the brains of smokers. The team used neuroimaging techniques to study the emotional reaction of smokers to aversive smoking-related images (e.g., lung cancer) compared to other aversive images (e.g., an old man on his deathbed) as well as appetitive smoking-related images.

    Co-researcher Stephane Potvin said, "We discovered that the brain regions associated with motivation are more active in smokers when they see pleasurable images associated with cigarettes and less active when smokers are confronted with the negative effects of smoking."


  6. #886
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Dropped your biscuit? Follow the five-second food rule
    The five-second rule is not just an urban legend. A study conducted by Aston University's School of Life and Health Sciences in the UK says that food picked up within a few seconds of being dropped is less likely to contain bacteria than if it is left out for a longer period of time. If the floor is carpeted, then the chances of bacteria being transferred to the food are lower. Shiny surfaces facilitate faster transfer of bacteria to food, found the research.

    The study, undertaken by final year biology students monitored the transfer of the common bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus from a variety of indoor floor types (carpet, laminate and tiled surfaces) to toast, pasta, biscuit and a sticky sweet when contact was made from 3 to 30 seconds.

    The results showed that time plays a significant role in transfer of bacteria from a floor surface to a piece of food. The type of flooring the food has been dropped, too, has an effect: bacteria is least likely to transfer from carpeted surfaces and most likely to transfer from laminate or tiled surfaces to moist foods making contact for more than 5 seconds.

    A press release sent out by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health on behalf of the research says, "Consuming food dropped on the floor still carries an infection risk as it very much depends on which bacteria are present on the floor at the time; however the findings of this study will bring some light relief to those who have been employing the five-second rule for years, despite a general consensus that it is purely a myth. We have found evidence that transfer from indoor flooring surfaces is incredibly poor with carpet actually posing the lowest risk of bacterial transfer onto dropped food.''

    Incidentally, women were more likely than men to eat food dropped on the floor. The university's survey found that 81% of the women surveyed who would eat food from the floor would follow the 5-second rule.


  7. #887
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Hair today, beard tomorrow

    Hair transplant as a cure to baldness is passe. Getting beard transplant is the new cool.

    Back in the 1970s, facial fuzz was part of a Leftist's accessory in universities, along with chappals and cigarettes. But as the clean, corporate look took over in the decades that followed, beards became increasingly rare, much like Marxists themselves. In recent months, however, newspaper reports say, the beard is back in fashion in the West. And, as cosmetic surgeons say, there is a rising demand to rearrange facial furniture here as well.

    Beard transplant involves transplanting hair from the head to a patient's face under local anaesthesia. Plastic surgeons say the procedure costs anywhere between Rs 50,000 to Rs 4 lakh, the same as growing hair on the scalp through transplant. Reshaping beard, a popular non-surgical procedure conducted using laser technology, costs about Rs 15,000 to 25,000.

    Experts say hair transplant to rearrange your facial furniture is far more challenging than scalp hair transplant. "In beard transplant, we transplant single hair grafts at an acute angle of 15-25 degrees. In scalp, it is 60-70 degrees. The angle and the direction changes at different points of the face making the process more time consuming and challenging," says Dr Swaroop Singh Gambhir, consultant, plastic and hair transplant surgeon at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital. An average beard hair transplant takes about eight to 10 hours, he says.

    The method has found more takers in recent years. A few years back, only the odd request came for such a transplant. "Now there are many requests to thicken or reshape beards. We see at least 10- 15 patients every month in our OPD. Transplant is common among those scarred by acne or accident. Many Sikhs, who lose beard hair due to continuous traction or prolonged use of hair-fixers, also undergo the procedure," says Gambhir.

    According to Dr Naveen Taneja, director of the National Skin Centre, models and visual artists also go for beard reshaping or transplant to look different. "I have handled three-four such cases in the recent past," he says.

    Doctors initially prefer hormonal injections for those with thin beard or lack of hair growth in the face. "If that does not help and patients insist, we suggest transplant. It is a fast-catching trend," he says.

    Dr Arvind Poswal, credited with first documented beard hair-to-scalp transplant in February 2006, submits that Indian men generally have ample facial hair. "Beard transplant is more common in the West. Many Hollywood actors flaunt different styles of beard which may be the inspiration behind young individuals trying to ape the look," the expert says. Even Bollywood actor Saif Ali Khan is sporting a bearded look these days.

    Trivia: Eighteenth century Russian emperor Peter the Great imposed a tax for anyone sporting a beard. The clergy and the peasants were excluded.


  8. #888
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Home dialysis, a hassle-free option

    With the drop in the cost of performing dialysis at home, several working professionals and those living in remote areas are opting for the procedure. The use of Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD), which can be done at home, is slowly catching up in Aurangabad.

    Medical experts said though the system has been around for 14 years now, it was not being used much because of the high cost involved. Now that the costs have come down, it is an ideal choice for people with kidney failure, especially working professionals and those living in far-off places.

    "Though the advantage of the CAPD over hemo dialysis or blood dialysis is that it can be done at home and by the patient," said nephrologist Sudhir Kulkarni.

    The first instance of patient opting for CAPD is recorded two decades back in 1995. Today, Aurangabad records about 30 patients from various professions such as engineers, bankers, businessmen, students and senior citizens using CAPD.

    "Now that the costs have come down drastically, it is an ideal choice for people with kidney failure, especially those who live in far-flung and rural areas," said Mangala Borkar, head of medicine department at Government Medical College and Hospital.

    The GMCH treats around 100-150 patients of hemo and peritoneal dialysis per month but CAPD has not been introduced at GMCH so far.

    Suresh Kalyankar, 46, was diagnosed with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) around five years ago. His chronic kidney disease aggravated to an extent where the organs were no longer able to function properly enough for Kalyankar to lead his daily life.

    "I was thinking of quitting my job. I had to undergo dialysis thrice a week. This continued for three years. Now, I'm on manual dialysis (CAPD) and life is back to normal," the insurance company employee said.

    "Home dialysis involves two types of machines - automated peritoneal dialysis and CAPD, in which the patient can carry out the procedure on his own," said Suhas Bawikar, nephrologist.

    Hemodialysis costs a patient Rs 10,000 to Rs 12,000 per month (minus the cost of visits to the hospital), while CAPD costs between Rs 15,000- Rs 20,000 every month but is possible in the comfort of the patient's home.

    "In blood dialysis, the patient has to be hospitalised for three-four times a week, whereas the peritoneal one is a 25-minute process and has to be done thrice a day," he said.


  9. #889
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    New vaginal gel could help protect women against HIV

    Researchers have revealed that a new after-sex vagina gel can be used by women to protect themselves against HIV.

    According to scientists at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia, drugs applied three hours after exposure to the virus could protect female monkeys from a type of HIV, the BBC reported.

    Researchers have said that this study would require large clinical trials to test any new treatment and that condoms still remain the best defense against HIV.

    Scientists found that the gel protected five out of six monkeys from an animal-human laboratory strain of HIV, when it was applied before or three hours after infection.

    Dr Charles Dobard, of the division of HIV/Aids prevention, said that the gel used is a promising after-sex vaginal gel to prevent HIV infection and studies still need to look for the window of opportunity.

    Dr Andrew Freedman, reader and consultant in infectious diseases at Cardiff University School of Medicine, said that the gel contained a different class of anti- HIV drug, which attacks the virus at a later stage in infection.

    The study is published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.


  10. #890
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    Re: Health Bulletin

    Ultrasound misses heart defects in fetuses if mother is overweight: Study

    It is important for pregnant women to undergo ultrasound scans to detect heart defects, if any, in fetuses. But a study from Sweden says that over six in every ten serious heart defects in fetuses go undetected in the ultrasound scans. The reason? The mother-to-be is too overweight or overweight for the scan to be effective.

    "The lives of children born with serious heart defects are in constant danger; some of them need immediate operations or medical treatment," said Eric Hildebrand of the Linkoping University Hospital Women's Clinic. If the defect is serious, parents can plan the delivery is such a manner that the child gets the needed medical attention immediately at birth. If living in an area with inadequate pediatric heart care, the parents to-be can plan the delivery in a better city, for instance.

    Hildebrand said one reason for missing malformations is that the ultrasound image is affected by the body of the mother. For example diagnosis is made more difficult by obesity - a BMI over 30 - which is the case for 13% of the mothers in the Swedish study.

    "Subcutaneous fat detracts from the quality of the image, making it more difficult for us to see malformations," said Dr Hildebrand.


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