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food for 8 month old baby


Discussions on "food for 8 month old baby" in "Newborn and Infants" forum.


  1. #1
    chitraabala is offline Newbie
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    food for 8 month old baby

    what are all the foods that we can give for a 8 months old baby boy?

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  2. #2
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    Re: food for 8 month old baby

    1)idlya thannila thottu sapida tharalam baby ku.
    2) vega vaitha paruppula satham potu sapida tharalam..(note:-Saatham nalla venthu irukanum..).
    3)apram vega vaitha urulai kizhangula saatham potu mix panni sapida tharalam...

    Moderator's Note: This Article has been published in Penmai eMagazine December 2014. You Can download & Read the magazines HERE.






    Last edited by sumathisrini; 18th Dec 2014 at 04:52 PM.
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    Re: food for 8 month old baby

    Hai Chitra

    Neenga already health mix pathi ketrukara threadla solliruken. Apart from those items, you can also give, banana fruit.


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    Jayanthy





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    Re: food for 8 month old baby

    Hi Chitrabala!

    Pl. go through
    here food for less than one year old children.


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    Re: food for 8 month old baby

    Hai chithra,
    here is some charts for what to give at what time....










  6. #6
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    Re: food for 8 month old baby

    When
    What How to Prepare
    4-6 months Single-grain cereals
    (Fortified cereals give your baby iron, an important nutrient he needs now. A baby is born with a natural reserve of iron that begins to deplete around 6 months of age.)
    Mix with baby formula or breast milk, or water on occasion.
    6-8 months Pureed or strained fruits (bananas, pears, apples, apricots, prunes) Wash all fresh fruits, then bake, boil, or steam until soft. You can puree in either a blender or a food processor, or use a small hand food mill; add a little liquid like breast milk, baby formula, or water at first. Make it watery at first, then use less liquid as your baby gets used to solid foods.
    Pureed or strained vegetables (avocados, carrots, peas, potatoes, squash) Wash all fresh vegetables; then bake, boil, or steam until soft. You can puree in either a blender or a food processor, or use a small hand food mill; add a little liquid like breast milk, baby formula, or water at first. You can use less water for a thicker puree as your baby gets used to the new foods.
    Protein: pea-sized pieces of cooked chicken, turkey, or other meats, or boneless fish; beans such as lentils, black, red, or pinto beans.
    (Doctors used to recommend waiting a bit to introduce meats, but now they note these are a good source of iron, particularly for breastfed babies, who may not be getting enough.
    Cut meat or fish into very small pieces; cook and mash or cut up beans.
    8-10 months Mashed fruits and vegetables No need to puree; just cook foods such as carrots and sweet potatoes until soft, or mash up soft foods like bananas and avocados.
    Finger foods like small o-shaped cereals, teething crackers, or small pieces of cooked pasta Cut up to make sure the pieces are small enough for your baby to swallow without choking.
    Dairy: small amounts of yogurt, cottage cheese, or any pasteurized cheese Cut cheese into small pieces.
    Eggs Scramble, or hard-boil and cut into small pieces.
    10-12 months Baby can try eating most of the foods you eat now, if they are cut up or mashed properly so that he can safely chew and swallow. Unless you have a strong family history of allergies, the American Academy of Pediatrics now says there is no need to avoid peanut products, eggs, wheat, or fish until after one year, although many pediatricians are still cautious about peanuts and shellfish due to the strong allergic reactions sometimes associated with them. Avoid whole cow’s milk and honey until at least one year. Honey can cause a dangerous illness called infant botulism. As your baby gets more teeth and learns to chew more effectively, he will begin to be able to eat larger pieces of food. Continue to monitor his chewing carefully, and when in doubt, cut pieces smaller than you think necessary. Be especially careful with round, firm foods like grapes and hot dogs, which pose a particular choking hazard to babies. Chop these into very small pieces.



  7. #7
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    Re: food for 8 month old baby

    Birth to Four Months (Breast Milk or Formula Only)


    • 0-3 weeks
      • 1/2-1 oz. increasing to 4 oz. every 2-3 hours about 8 times a day (12-24 oz.)

    • 3 Weeks-4 Months
      • 4-6 oz. every 3-4 hours about 6 times a day (24-32 oz.)
      • The wee one’s digestive tract is still developing, so keep all feeding liquids. No solids yet.
      • Rooting reflex, a reflex seen in newborn babies causing them to automatically turn their face toward the stimulus and make sucking movements, helps your baby find nourishment organically.


    Four to Six Months

    • For Liquids (breast milk or formula)


    • 5-7 oz. every 4-5 hours about 5 times a day (24-36 oz.)
    • For Solids (liquid-soaked rice cereal, later try adding grain cereals)
      • Start with mixing 1 teaspoon dry iron-fortified rice cereal with 4 to 5 teaspoons breast milk or formula. Little by little thicken mixture by increasing to 1 tablespoon dry cereal combined with breast milk or formula. Mixture should be fed twice a day.
      • Remember not to prop the bottle as little ones can often choke this way. And though there are even propping devices sold, feeding time should be bonding time. Try to simulate breastfeeding rituals even if bottle feeding. Look into baby’s eyes, stoke their back, create an intimate space.
      • Use a pacifier if baby just wants to suck.


    Six to Nine Months

    • For Liquids (breast milk or formula)


    • 7-8 oz. about every 6 hours approximately 4 times a day (24-32 oz.)
    • For Solids (iron-fortified cereals, pureed or strained fruits and vegetables)
      • 3 to 9 tablespoons cereal given over 2 to 3 feedings per day
      • 1 teaspoon fruit, gradually increased to 1/4 to 1/2 cup in 2 to 3 feedings per day
      • 1 teaspoons vegetable, gradually increased to 1/4 to 1/2 cup in 2 to 3 feedings per day
      • Be sure to introduce new foods one at a time, to ensure your sweet babe is not allergic. Wait at least three days in between each new food.
      • Pureed or strained fruits to try include banana, pears, applesauce, peaches, apricots, plums, and avocado (yes, avocado is a fruit!).
      • Pureed or strained vegetables to try include well-cooked carrots, squash, sweet potato, green beans, and peas.
      • Always nurse or formula feed first before introducing solids.




  8. #8
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    Re: food for 8 month old baby

    Nine to Twelve Months


    • For Liquids (breast milk or formula)


    • 7-8 oz. about every 6 hours approximately 4 times a day (24-32 oz.)
    • For Solids (iron-fortified cereals, pureed or strained fruits and vegetables, small amounts of dairy products, finger foods, proteins, non-citrus juice)
      • 1/4 to 1/3 cup dairy (or 1/2 oz. cheese) per day
      • 1/4 to 1/2 cup iron-fortified cereal per day
      • 1/4 to 1/2 cup fruit per day
      • 1/4 to 1/2 cup vegetables per day
      • 1/8 to 1/4 cup protein foods per day
      • 3 to 4 oz. non-citrus juices per day



    • Start feeding in high chair.
    • Try using a cup for juice. Remember, juice doesn’t replace breast milk or formula. Non-citrus juices include apple or pear.
    • Feed only foods that will dissolve in baby’s mouth.
    • Dairy products suitable for baby include soft pasteurized cheese, yogurt, cottage cheese; no cow’s milk till 1 year.
    • Fruit and vegetables can now be cut into cubes or strips and fed to baby, as can purees and mashes. Vegetables should always be bite-sized and soft-cooked until tender.
    • Small amounts of proteins should be introduced. These can include egg, pureed meats and poultry as well as boneless fish. Tofu is also a great baby protein. Also try offering baby well-cooked and/or mashed beans with soft skins like lentils, split peas, pintos, black beans.
    • Finger foods include cut-up lightly-toasted bagel pieces, well-cooked piece pasta (no noodles), teething crackers, and low-sugar cereals.
    • It is also during the later of the months that combo foods can be given to baby. Try tasty treats like macaroni and cheese or casseroles.

    Twelve to Eighteen Months

    • For Liquids


    • Approx 4 oz. cow’s/soy milk (or yogurt) up to 4 times a day.
    • You may continue to breastfeed as long as you and baby would like, baby will self-regulate amounts. Continue to introduce solids.
    • For Solids
      • Dairy: 4 daily servings; 1/2 Cup; 3/4 Ounce Cheese
      • Bread, Cereal, Rice and Pasta: 6 daily servings; 1/2 Slice or 1/4 Cup
      • Fruit: 3 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
      • Vegetables: 2 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
      • Protein: 2 daily servings; 1 Tablespoon; 1 Egg; 1/2 Cup Cooked Beans and Eggs
      • 3 to 4 oz. non-citrus juices per day



    • Give your child snacks at the table rather than letting them walk around grazing.
    • If your child hasn’t given up the bottle yet, now’s the time!
    • Your child can eat almost any food after age 1 as long as it’s in a form that’s safe for him, i.e. pureed or finely chopped – just no reduced-fat milks.
    • Your toddler will continue to show a heightened interest in self-feeding, first with fingers and then with utensils at around 15 to 18 months of age. Use every opportunity possible to practice the skills needed for self-feeding. Be sure to lend a hand when frustrations occur.

    Eighteen to Twenty-Four Months

    • For Liquids


    • Approx 12-20 oz. cow’s/soy milk per day.
    • You may continue to breastfeed as long as you and baby would like; baby will self-regulate amounts. Continue to introduce solids.
    • Your growing babe should have three to six cups of water per day including the water in breast milk, juices, whole milk and food. Supplement with drinking water.
    • For Solids
      • Dairy: 4 daily servings; 1/2 Cup; 3/4 Ounce Cheese
      • Bread, Cereal, Rice and Pasta: 6 daily servings; 1/2 Slice or 1/4 Cup
      • Fruit: 3 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
      • Vegetables: 2 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
      • Protein: 2 daily servings; 1 Tablespoon; 1 Egg; 1/2 Cup Cooked Beans



    • Offer your little love three meals and two or three snacks each day, but remember that it’s quite common for your 18-24 month old to skip meals. Skipping a meal may be a difficult concept for you, but children need to learn to listen to internal cues for hunger and fullness. Don’t be a pusher; allow a kid who’s not hungry to wait it out. Allowing children to eat on demand all day can be just as harmful.
    • Continue serving iron-fortified cereal until your child is 18 to 24 months old to ensure correct iron levels and counteract possible anemia.
    • Speak with your doctor if you’re considering giving your child a vitamin supplement.

    Twenty-Four Months+

    • For Liquids


    • Children should be given five to eight cups of water per day including the water in beverages and food. Make up for extra with drinking water. Liquids should include:
    • Milk
    • Juice
    • Water
    • For Solids
      • Dairy: 5 daily servings; 1/2 Cup; 3/4 Ounce Cheese
      • Bread, Cereal, Rice and Pasta: 7 daily servings; 1/2 Slice or 1/4 Cup
      • Fruit: 3 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
      • Vegetables: 3 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
      • Protein: 2 daily servings; 1 Tablespoon; 1 Egg; 1/2 Cup Cooked Beans and Eggs



    • After your rapidly growing little one turns two, they can enjoy the same foods the rest of the family eats, just control portion size.
    • Continue to serve three meals per day with two optional snacks.
    • Offering your tot a balanced diet with minimum saturated fats and partially hydrogenated fat aids in developing the healthy eating habits later on.


    SOURCE:http://www.babble.com/baby/bottle-feeding-introducing-solids-baby-feeding-guide/feeding-chart-birth-toddler-baby-feeding-guide/



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