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first aid for infants


Discussions on "first aid for infants" in "Newborn and Infants" forum.


  1. #1
    firthous is offline Newbie
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    first aid for infants

    hi frds ....my previous post reply are very useful to me... thanks to all. i want to know some of the first aid for infant. such as pour hot water into their....or playing objects make any rashes smthng.what we do first going before dr....

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  2. #2
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    Re: first aid for infants


    Dear Frithous, I would like to suggest following first aid tips for the infants.


    CPR/Unconscious:

    Tap the patient’s shoulder and shout “Are you OK?” or for an infant, flick the foot. If he does not move or react, open the airway and look, listen and feel for breathing for no more than ten seconds. Tilt the head and lift the chin to open the airway. Gasping is not normal breathing.

    Choking/Breathing:

    Rest the infant face down on your forearm. Place your forearm on your lap or thigh. Keep the infant’s head lower than the chest. Support the head and jaw with your hand. Give five back slaps between the shoulder blades with enough force to drive the object out.

    Allergic Reaction:

    The tongue, face or neck may swell and close the airway. The faster the reaction, the more severe it is.

    Bleeding:

    If a sharp object remains partly stuck in the body, do not take it out.

    Burns:

    If a dry chemical caused the burn, carefully brush it off. Use a gloved hand or clean cloth. Immediately flush the chemical off with large amounts of water.

    Falls/Bone Injury:

    The first aid steps are the same whether the bone is actually broken or not. Do not attempt to move the patient unless the scene is unsafe or his life is in danger. Do not move or try to straighten an injured limb.

    Poison, Bites, Stings:

    If you suspect a poisonous snake bite, call 911 or your emergency response number immediately. Ask the patient to be still and calm. Tell the patient not to move the part of the body that was bitten and to keep it below heart level.

    Seizures:

    Do not try to stop the convulsions or seizures. Do not hold or restrain the person. Clear the area of anything sharp or hard to protect the patient from injury. Protect the victim’s head by placing a thin cushion or folded clothing under it.

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    Re: first aid for infants

    In a detailed manner, the step by step approach to deal with Infant first aid for choking and CPR is given as follows:

    What is CPR?
    CPR stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This is the lifesaving measure you can take to save a baby who shows no signs of life (consciousness or effective breathing).

    CPR uses chest compressions and "rescue" breaths to make oxygen-rich blood circulate through the brain and other vital organs until emergency medical personnel arrive. Keeping oxygenated blood circulating helps prevent brain damage – which can occur within a few minutes – and death.
    CPR isn't hard to do. Follow these steps:

    Step 1: Check the baby's condition.
    Is the baby conscious? Flick her foot or gently tap on her shoulder and call out. If she doesn't respond, have someone call emergency helpline of your local hospital or the local emergency number.

    Swiftly but gently place the baby on her back on a firm, flat surface.
    Make sure she isn't severely bleeding.

    If she is, take measures to stop the bleeding by applying pressure to the area. Don't administer CPR until the bleeding is under control.

    Step 2: Open the baby's airway.

    Tilt the baby's head back with one hand and lift his chin slightly with the other. (You don't have to tilt a baby's head back very far to open the airway.)

    Check for signs of breathing for no more than ten seconds.

    To check for breathing in a baby, put your head down next to his mouth, looking toward his feet. Look to see whether his chest is rising, and listen for breathing sounds. If he's breathing, you should be able to feel his breath on your cheek.

    Step 3: Give two gentle "rescue" breaths.

    If the baby isn't breathing, give her two little breaths, each lasting just one second. Cover the baby's nose and mouth with your mouth and gently exhale into her lungs only until you see her chest rise, pausing between rescue breaths to let the air flow back out.

    Remember that a baby's lungs are much smaller than yours, so it takes much less than a full breath to fill them. Breathing too hard or too fast can force air into the baby's stomach.

    If her chest doesn't rise, her airway is blocked. Give her first aid for choking, described above.

    Step 4: Do 30 chest compressions.
    With the baby still lying on his back, place the pads of two or three fingers in the center of his chest, just below an imaginary line running between his nipples.

    With the pads of your fingers on that spot, compress the chest about 1 1/2 inches. Push straight down. Compressions should be smooth, not jerky.

    Do 30 chest compressions at the rate of 100 per minute. When you complete 30 compressions, give two rescue breaths (step 3, above). (Each cycle of chest compressions and rescue breaths should take about 24 seconds.)

    Step 5: Repeat compressions and breaths.
    Repeat the sequence of 30 compressions and two breaths. If you're alone with the baby, call 911 or the local emergency number after two minutes of care.

    Continue the sequence of compressions and breaths until help arrives, you find an obvious sign of life, an AED (automated external defibrillator) is ready to use, the scene becomes unsafe, or you are too exhausted to continue.

    Even if the baby seems fine by the time help arrives, a doctor will need to check her to make sure that her airway is completely clear and she hasn't sustained any internal injuries.


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    Re: first aid for infants

    Choking

    Step 1: Assess the situation quickly.

    If a baby is suddenly unable to cry or cough, something is probably blocking her airway, and you'll need to help her get it out.

    She may make odd noises or no sound at all while opening her mouth. Her skin may turn bright red or blue.

    If she's coughing it means her airway is only partially blocked. If that's the case, let her continue to cough. Coughing is the most effective way to dislodge a blockage.

    If the baby isn't able to cough up the object, ask someone to call emergency help line or the local emergency number while you begin back blows and chest thrusts (see step 2, below).

    If you're alone with the baby, give two minutes of care, then call emergency help line or local hospital emergency number.

    On the other hand, if you suspect that the baby's airway is closed because her throat has swollen shut, call emergency helpline immediately. She may be having reaction due to allergy – to food or to an insect bite, for example – or she may have an illness, like croup.

    Also call emergency helpline right away if the baby is at high risk for heart problems.

    Step 2: Try to dislodge the object with back blows and chest thrusts.

    First do back blows

    If a baby is conscious but can't cough, cry, or breathe and you believe something is trapped in his airway, carefully position him face up on one forearm, cradling the back of his head with that hand.

    Place the other hand and forearm on his front. He is now sandwiched between your forearms.

    Use your thumb and fingers to hold his jaw and turn him over so that he's face down along the other forearm. Lower your arm onto your thigh so that the baby's head is lower than his chest.

    Using the heel of your hand, deliver five firm and distinct back blows between the baby's shoulder blades to try to dislodge the object. Maintain support of his head and neck by firmly holding his jaw between your thumb and forefinger.

    Next, place your free hand (the one that had been delivering the back blows) on the back of the baby's head with your arm along his spine. Carefully turn him over while keeping your other hand and forearm on his front.

    Then do chest thrusts

    Use your thumb and fingers to hold his jaw while sandwiching him between your forearms to support his head and neck. Lower your arm that is supporting his back onto your opposite thigh, still keeping the baby's head lower than the rest of his body.
    Place the pads of two or three fingers in the center of the baby's chest, just below an imaginary line running between his nipples. To do a chest thrust, push straight down on the chest about 1 1/2 inches. Then allow the chest to come back to its normal position.
    Do five chest thrusts. Keep your fingers in contact with the baby's breastbone. The chest thrusts should be smooth, not jerky.

    Repeat back blows and chest thrusts

    Continue alternating five back blows and five chest thrusts until the object is forced out or the baby starts to cough forcefully, cry, or breathe on his own. If he's coughing, let him try to cough up the object.

    If the baby becomes unconscious

    If a baby who is choking on something becomes unconscious, you'll need to do what's called modified CPR. Here's how to do modified CPR on a baby:

    Open his mouth and look for an object. If you can see an object, remove it with your little finger.

    Give him two rescue breaths. If the air doesn't go in (you don't see his chest rise), tilt his head and try two rescue breaths again.

    If his chest still doesn't rise, do 30 chest compressions.

    Look in his mouth and remove the object if you see it. Give him two more rescue breaths.

    Repeat the chest compressions and so on, until help arrives.


  5. #5
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    Re: first aid for infants

    Choking Step 1: Assess the situation quickly. If a baby is suddenly unable to cry or cough, something is probably blocking her airway, and you'll need to help her get it out. She may make odd noises or no sound at all while opening her mouth. Her skin may turn bright red or blue. If she's coughing it means her airway is only partially blocked. If that's the case, let her continue to cough. Coughing is the most effective way to dislodge a blockage. If the baby isn't able to cough up the object, ask someone to call emergency help line or the local emergency number while you begin back blows and chest thrusts (see step 2, below). If you're alone with the baby, give two minutes of care, then call emergency help line On the other hand, if you suspect that the baby's airway is closed because her throat has swollen shut, call emergency help line immediately. She may be having allergy to food or to an insect bite, for example – or she may have an illness, croup. Also call emergency help line right away if the baby is at high risk for heart problems. Step 2: Try to dislodge the object with back blows and chest thrusts. First do back blows If a baby is conscious but can't cough, cry, or breathe and you believe something is trapped in his airway, carefully position him face up on one forearm, cradling the back of his head with that hand. Place the other hand and forearm on his front. He is now sandwiched between your forearms. Use your thumb and fingers to hold his jaw and turn him over so that he's face down along the other forearm. Lower your arm onto your thigh so that the baby's head is lower than his chest. Using the heel of your hand, deliver five firm and distinct back blows between the baby's shoulder blades to try to dislodge the object. Maintain support of his head and neck by firmly holding his jaw between your thumb and forefinger. Next, place your free hand (the one that had been delivering the back blows) on the back of the baby's head with your arm along his spine. Carefully turn him over while keeping your other hand and forearm on his front. Then do chest thrusts Use your thumb and fingers to hold his jaw while sandwiching him between your forearms to support his head and neck. Lower your arm that is supporting his back onto your opposite thigh, still keeping the baby's head lower than the rest of his body. Place the pads of two or three fingers in the center of the baby's chest, just below an imaginary line running between his nipples. To do a chest thrust, push straight down on the chest about 1 1/2 inches. Then allow the chest to come back to its normal position. Do five chest thrusts. Keep your fingers in contact with the baby's breastbone. The chest thrusts should be smooth, not jerky. Continue alternating five back blows and five chest thrusts until the object is forced out or the baby starts to cough forcefully, cry, or breathe on his own. If he's coughing, let him try to cough up the object. If the baby becomes unconscious If a baby who is choking on something becomes unconscious, you'll need to do what's called modified CPR. Here's how to do modified CPR on a baby: Open his mouth and look for an object. If you can see an object, remove it with your little finger. Give him two rescue breaths. If the air doesn't go in (you don't see his chest rise), tilt his head and try two rescue breaths again. If his chest still doesn't rise, do 30 chest compressions. Look in his mouth and remove the object if you see it. Give him two more rescue breaths. Repeat the chest compressions and so on, until help arrives.


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