Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links
Penmai eMagazine November! | All Issues

User Tag List

Like Tree34Likes

Baby's Mile stones and developments


Discussions on "Baby's Mile stones and developments" in "Newborn and Infants" forum.


  1. #1
    jv_66's Avatar
    jv_66 is offline Super Moderator Silver Ruler's of Penmai
    Real Name
    Jayanthy
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    31,985

    Baby's Mile stones and developments

    From helpless newborn to active toddler: It takes just 12 short months for your baby to undergo this incredible transformation. Babies grow and change at an astounding pace, and every month brings new and exciting developments.

    New moms and dads often wonder what to expect next and how to know if their baby’s development is on target. Instead of focusing too much on developmental milestones, however, it’s important to remember that babies all develop at their own pace. There’s a fairly wide “window” for when it is normal for a baby to reach a particular developmental stage.
    “If your baby reaches one milestone sooner, she may reach another one later, because she’s so busy perfecting the other skill,” says Jennifer Shu, MD, pediatrician .

    Some babies may say their first word at eight months, while others don’t talk until a little after the one-year mark. And walking may start anytime between nine and 18 months.
    Keeping those kinds of variations in mind, here’s what your baby may be doing during each three-month stage of the first year.
    Baby Development: One to Three Months

    During this first development stage, babies’ bodies and brains are learning to live in the outside world. Between birth and three months, your baby may start to:

    • Smile. Early on, it will be just to herself. But within three months, she’ll be smiling in response to your smiles and trying to get you to smile back at her.
    • Raise her head and chest when on her tummy.
    • Track objects with her eyes and gradually decrease eye crossing.
    • Open and shut her hands and bring hands to her mouth.
    • Grip objects in her hands.
    • Take swipes at or reach for dangling objects, though she usually won’t be able to get them yet.

    Baby Development: Four to Six Months

    During these months, babies are really learning to reach out and manipulate the world around them. They’re mastering the use of those amazing tools, their hands. And they’re discovering their voices. From 4 to 6 months old, your baby will probably:

    • Roll over from front to back or back to front. Front-to-back usually comes first.
    • Babble, making sounds that can sound like real language.
    • Laugh.
    • Reach out for and grab objects (watch out for your hair), and manipulate toys and other objects with her hands.
    • Sit up with support and have great head control.



    Baby Development: Seven to Nine Months

    During the second half of this year, your little one becomes a baby on the go. After learning that he can get somewhere by rolling over, he’ll spend the next few months figuring out how to move forward or backward. If you haven’t baby-proofed yet, better get on it!

    • During this time period, your baby may:
    • Start to crawl. This can include scooting (propelling around on his bottom) or “army crawling” (dragging himself on his tummy by arms and legs), as well as standard crawling on hands and knees. Some babies never crawl, moving directly to from scooting to walking.
    • Sit without support.
    • Respond to familiar words like his name. He may also respond to “No” by briefly stopping and looking at you, and may start babbling "Mama" and "Dada."
    • Clap and play games such as patty-cake and peekaboo.
    • Learn to pull up to a standing position.









    Similar Threads:

    Sponsored Links
    Jayanthy





  2. #2
    jv_66's Avatar
    jv_66 is offline Super Moderator Silver Ruler's of Penmai
    Real Name
    Jayanthy
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    31,985

    Re: Baby's Mile stones and developments

    Baby Development: 10 to 12 Months


    The last development stage in baby’s first year is quite a transition. She isn’t an infant anymore, and she might look and act more like a toddler. But she’s still a baby in many ways. She’s learning to:
    • Begin feeding herself. Babies at this developmental stage master the “pincer grasp“ -- meaning they can hold small objects such as O-shaped cereal between their thumb and forefinger.
    • Cruise, or move around the room on her feet while holding onto the furniture.
    • Say one or two words, and "Mama" and "Dada" become specific name for parents. The average is about three spoken words by the first birthday, but the range on this is enormous.
    • Point at objects she wants in order to get your attention.
    • Begin “pretend play” by copying you or using objects correctly, such as pretending to talk on the phone.
    • Take her first steps. This usually happens right around one year, but it can vary greatly.

    Your Baby’s Development: When to Talk to a Pediatrician

    What should you do if you think your baby is not meeting growth or developmental milestones, when he should? First, says Shu, trust your instincts. “If you really feel like something’s wrong, then talk to your doctor about it because if there is a problem, we want to catch it as soon as we can," she says. "Early intervention is best, and you know your child better than anyone.”
    Remember, however, that it is not exactly when your baby sits up by himself or says his first words that is important; it’s that he’s moving forward in his development. “Don’t look at the time as much as the progression, and see that your child is changing and growing,” says Shu. “It’s not a race. Nobody’s going to ask on a college application when your child first walked or said ‘da-da.’”


    Jayanthy





  3. #3
    jv_66's Avatar
    jv_66 is offline Super Moderator Silver Ruler's of Penmai
    Real Name
    Jayanthy
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    31,985

    Re: Baby's Mile stones and developments

    Your Child’s Development -- Month by Month

    This table shows common developmental milestones that babies reach each month during their first year, in four major categories. Keep in mind that all babies are different and every baby grows at his own pace. There's no precise time that most of these skills first appear. If your child hasn’t reached a milestone by the month it is listed on this chart, it is usually a perfectly normal variation in child development. Watch for progress, not deadlines.


    Gross Motor Fine Motor Language/
    Cognitive
    Social
    1 month Moves head from side to side when on stomach Strong grip Stares at hands and fingers Tracks movement with eyes
    2 months Holds head and neck up briefly while on tummy Opens and closes hands Begins to play with fingers Smiles responsively
    3 months Reaches and grabs at objects Grips objects in hands Coos Imitates you when you stick out your tongue
    4 months Pushes up on arms when lying on tummy Grabs objects -- and gets them! Laughs out loud Enjoys play and may cry when playing stops
    5 months Begins to roll over in one or the other direction Is learning to transfer objects from one hand to the other Blows “raspberries” (spit bubbles) Reaches for mommy or daddy and cries if they’re out of sight
    6 months Rolls over both ways Uses hands to “rake” small objects Babbles Recognizes familiar faces --caregivers and friends as well as family
    7 months Moves around --is starting to crawl, scoot, or “army crawl” Is learning to use thumb and fingers Babbles in a more complex way Responds to other people’s expressions of emotion
    8 months Sits well without support Begins to clap hands Responds to familiar words, looks when you say his name Plays interactive games like peekaboo
    9 months May try to climb/crawl up stairs Uses the pincer grasp Learns object permanence -- that something exists even if he can’t see it Is at the height of stranger anxiety
    10 months Pulls up to stand Stacks and sorts toys Waves bye-bye and/or lifts up arms to communicate “up” Learns to understand cause and effect (“I cry, Mommy comes”)
    11 months Cruises, using furniture Turns pages while you read Says “mama” or “dada” for either parent Uses mealtime games (dropping spoon, pushing food away) to test your reaction; expresses food preferences
    12 months Stands unaided and may take first steps Helps while getting dressed (pushes hands into sleeves) Says an average of 2-3 words (often “mama” and “dada”) Plays imitative games such as pretending to use the phone




    Jayanthy





  4. #4
    jv_66's Avatar
    jv_66 is offline Super Moderator Silver Ruler's of Penmai
    Real Name
    Jayanthy
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    31,985

    Re: Baby's Mile stones and developments

    The 9 major physical milestones

    Smiling (8 weeks)


    An infant can't produce what's called a social smile until about 8 weeks. It takes that long for his nervous system and vision to develop enough to see you and produce a smile in response.
    Smiling is a baby's first social skill -- he's picking up on how relationships work -- as well as a signal of emotional growth. Your baby is showing you he can distinguish between different emotional states; he's aware that the happy feeling he gets when he sees you isn't the same as the sad feeling he has when you're not around.

    Rolling over (2 or 3 months)
    During tummy time (which you should supervise), your baby may lift herself into a push-up position and then start to rock back and forth or kick her feet. Then, if she's strong enough, those movements will send her rolling over. (She may get startled and cry the first time!) Flipping from back to front often takes until around 5 months because it requires more coordination and strength. You don't need to coach your baby to roll, though; just make sure she has a safe place to try it out if she wants to.



    Grabbing (3 or 4 months)
    After the first few months, babies begin to gauge where things are in space, and they can plan an action, such as grabbing a pacifier. By simply dropping something and picking it up, your baby's learning that he can manipulate things with his hands, and he's learning more details about how his toys work. He can make the rattle produce a sound, for instance, which teaches him cause and effect. Being able to grab things means he can engage more in play -- whether by himself or with you.

    Hugging (5 months)
    Your baby will quickly learn to hug Mom, Dad, and other people she's comfortable around -- as well as her stuffed gorilla, the cat, and anything else she adores -- by watching others hug and getting hugged herself.


    Not all babies are wild about hugging, though. Some are naturally more affectionate, while others are just too busy exploring their environment to stop for a cuddle.
    So try not to take it personally if your baby isn't wrapping her arms around you. She might be more receptive to physical affection before naps, at bedtime, or while you're looking at a book together.


    Playing peekaboo (6 months)
    What is it about this game that makes your baby crack up no matter how many times you play? When a baby understands the concept of object permanence -- that even though he can't see your face, it's still there behind your hands or his blankie -- he gets a thrill from knowing that at any minute your smiling face will pop back into view.


    A few months later, he'll be able to play along by hiding himself. How to increase the fun:
    1. Sit close enough that your baby can see your eyes. It'll keep him focused on what you're doing.2. Ask, "Where's Mommy?" Your voice will reassure him that you're still there.3. Vary the length of time you're hiding and play with the tone of your voice to make the game more stimulating for him .

    Sitting up (8 months)

    Once your baby has enough balance, arm strength, and head, neck, and lower-body control, she'll be able to sit up and take in a whole new world. At this point, her improving eyesight will allow her to see objects outside her direct line of vision -- and she'll try to pull herself up to get a better look.

    At first, she won't be able to sit up for long on her own and may need to put out her hand for balance. To motivate your baby to sit well, dangle or set her favorite toy in front of her, then slowly move it from side to side to encourage her to reach for the toy and rely solely on her torso and legs for balance. She'll be sitting without help in no time!

    Crawling (6 to 10 months)

    Now that your baby's sitting up by himself, it won't be long before he's looking to broaden his horizons. He'll probably start by repositioning himself, from sitting to being on all fours. Then he'll test his arms: When he figures out that they can support him, off he'll go. Some babies start to move without doing the typical hands-and-knees crawl. Yours might shuffle across the floor on his bottom, slither on his belly, or even roll. To encourage him, clear some space. Then place things he likes (including yourself) just out of reach. And be sure to keep him safe by childproofing the house. Take a tour on your hands and knees, and remove anything your baby shouldn't get into.


    Pulling up (8 months)

    Until now, your baby has depended on you to help her get up on her feet. But at around 8 months, her torso and leg muscles will be strong enough for her to stand up on her own. It's also when she'll realize that she can: Her confidence has been boosted by her ability to roll over, sit up on her own, and crawl.
    At first, she'll look for things to pull up on -- the side of the crib, the arm of the sofa, your leg -- so be sure to remove objects that aren't safe or sturdy enough for support, or that have sharp edges she can fall on. And while she may not need to grab your fingers to get up anymore, she won't know how to bend her knees to sit until she's about 10 or 12 months.Walking (10 to 18 months)

    First steps represent a huge developmental leap. Walking requires muscle strength, coordination, balance -- and a certain level of emotional maturity, too. After all, when you're crawling, your center of gravity is just a few inches off the ground. To walk you need to have a bit more confidence. That's why some beginning walkers are content to cruise along the furniture for weeks. The more eager hike away and never look back.



    Last edited by jv_66; 6th Aug 2013 at 02:29 PM.
    Jayanthy





  5. #5
    jv_66's Avatar
    jv_66 is offline Super Moderator Silver Ruler's of Penmai
    Real Name
    Jayanthy
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    31,985

    Re: Baby's Mile stones and developments

    What influences your child's development?



    Temperament


    Some kids are daredevils: the first to climb onto the coffee table to see out the window and -- later -- the first to jump off the diving board. They're frequently the ones who walk early. More cautious kids often want to know they can do something well before they do it all.


    Natural strengths
    Think of your own family -- is there one person who's particularly good at writing or loves to build things? Individual fortes can show up as early as age 1, so a child who talks early may well end up being a talented writer or orator. This doesn't mean that children who are late bloomers in these areas won't thrive in them eventually, though.


    Siblings


    Kids with an older sib often reach milestones sooner than expected because they push themselves to keep up. On the flip side, having an older sibling may also mean that milestones come late -- if, for instance, a child has an older brother or sister who gets his toys for him rather than letting him get them himself. So sometimes you'll need to act as a referee, reminding your older child to let his brother try things by himself or not to push him too hard to do something he's not ready for yet.



    Premature birth


    Babies born early often take longer than others to reach milestones, but by age 2 they usually catch up to their peers. In fact, pediatricians say that when gauging a preemie's development, parents should begin counting from the child's due date, not from his birth date. So a child born three months early should be expected to reach at 6 months the milestones of a 3-month-old.



    Signs of developmental delays


    Most of the time, kids who are slow to develop in one area catch up just fine. But sometimes late milestones can signal a problem. The warning signs:


    * Your child is delayed in more than one area. For instance, she's 15 months old and hasn't uttered a word or taken a step, and she seems to be wrapped up in her own world, or she doesn't turn to look at you when you enter a room or say her name.
    * The delay is two months or more from the norm. He's 17 months old and not walking, or he's 7 months and hasn't smiled yet.
    * Your child doesn't seem to understand or respond when you talk. Somewhere between 8 and 12 months, most babies will point to their favorite stuffed animal if you ask them where it is, or at least look in the right direction. By 12 to 15 months, they'll begin to respond to simple verbal requests: If you ask a typical 1-year-old to bring you her shoe, she will.


    Easing your worries


    Milestones are often a source of stress for new moms, particularly if they focus too much on checking off items on a development chart rather than simply enjoying the glorious journey of their child's growth.

    How to stop the worries:



    Back away from the computer.


    Fueled by Internet searches, your mind can travel down all sorts of frightening pathways if your baby is not hitting his milestone markers. But the truth is that "normal" has very broad parameters.



    Stop comparing your baby to others
    .

    There is no indication that minor variations in the achievement of milestones have any relationship to later abilities or disabilities. So just because your friend's little achiever rolls over sooner than your baby doesn't mean your kid is less advanced.



    Seek help in extreme cases.


    A mild delay in one area of development is generally not a cause for concern, but if it's coupled with other delays, talk to your doctor. Also, let your pediatrician know when there's a lag of more than a few months in any area of development.

    Summary

    Your baby's first year is full of wonderful surprises -- for him and for you. Try not to worry about whether he's smiling, crawling, or walking "on time," and offer him gentle encouragement. And most of all, enjoy the ride!











    Jayanthy





  6. #6
    sumitra's Avatar
    sumitra is offline Registered User
    Blogger
    Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    mysore
    Posts
    23,699
    Blog Entries
    18

    Re: Baby's Mile stones and developments

    Very nice compilation. Very much helpful. thank you Jayanthy


  7. #7
    kirthika99's Avatar
    kirthika99 is offline Registered User
    Blogger
    Guru's of Penmai
    Real Name
    karkuzhali shanmugam
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    saudi arabia
    Posts
    5,062
    Blog Entries
    19

    Re: Baby's Mile stones and developments

    Excellent sharing jayanthi akka..

    Thanks alot!!

    sumathisrini and jv_66 like this.

    Regards,
    Kirthika

    A smile is a curve but it makes everything straight

  8. #8
    PriyagauthamH's Avatar
    PriyagauthamH is offline Registered User
    Blogger
    Guru's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    London
    Posts
    6,342
    Blog Entries
    6

    Re: Baby's Mile stones and developments

    Hi Jaya ka, thanks for the valuable info.... Very useful for new moms.....

    sumathisrini and jv_66 like this.
    Priya


  9. #9
    jv_66's Avatar
    jv_66 is offline Super Moderator Silver Ruler's of Penmai
    Real Name
    Jayanthy
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    31,985

    Re: Baby's Mile stones and developments

    Thanks Sumitra sister, Krithika and Priya

    sumathisrini and kirthika99 like this.
    Jayanthy





  10. #10
    sumathisrini's Avatar
    sumathisrini is offline Super Moderator Silver Ruler's of Penmai
    Real Name
    Sumathi
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Hosur
    Posts
    33,546

    Re: Baby's Mile stones and developments

    Very useful & nice thread Jayanthy, thanks .

    jv_66 likes this.

loading...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Like It?
Share It!







Follow Penmai on Twitter