Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links
Penmai eMagazine February! | All Issues

User Tag List

Like Tree24Likes

VRI Corner


Discussions on "VRI Corner" in "Other Countries" forum.


  1. #1
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    85,067

    VRI Corner



    The Indian living abroad have excelled spectacularly in their chosen professions and fields by dint of their single-minded dedication and hard work.

    They have excelled in fields like the IT, medicine, venture capital, engineering, construction etc. to name a few.

    The most important thing about the Indians living abroad is that they have retained their emotional, cultural and spiritual links with the country of their origin. This strikes a mutual chord in the hearts of people of India.



    Similar Threads:

    Sponsored Links
    Last edited by vijigermany; 23rd Jan 2014 at 05:00 PM.
    sumitra likes this.

  2. #2
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    85,067

    Re: VRI Corner

    Indian-American professor Rakesh Khurana named dean of prestigious Harvard College

    Indian-American professor Rakesh Khurana has been appointed dean of the prestigious Harvard College, becoming the latest addition to a long list of Indian-origin academicians assuming leadership roles at renowned global universities.

    Khurana, 46, is currently the 'Marvin Bower' professor of leadership development at Harvard Business School (HBS), professor of sociology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS), and co-master of Cabot House at Harvard.

    He succeeds Evelynn Hammonds, professor of history of science and of African and African American studies at Harvard and will assume his new role on July 1.

    Harvard College is the school within Harvard University that grants undergraduate degrees.

    Khurana earned his PhD through a joint programme between HBS and Harvard's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 1998.

    Harvard president Drew Faust described Khurana as a "faculty leader who embodies the interconnectedness" of Harvard.

    Indian-American professor Rakesh Khurana


    "His experiences as a graduate student, an award-winning teacher at HBS, and the master of an undergraduate house give him a unique perspective on the university, and his deep respect for the liberal-arts model and the residential education will serve him well as he guides Harvard College," Faust said in a statement issued on Wednesday.

    Following the announcement, Khurana said he is "honoured" to have the opportunity to serve the college and work with the faculty, students, and staff to create a "transformative educational experience for our students. I am convinced that, working together, we will have a significant and positive impact on the college."

    Although Khurana did not attend the college himself, he said, "one of the benefits of being a house master is that you get some window into student experiences."

    FAS dean Michael Smith, who announced the appointment in an email to the FAS community, praised Khurana as a scholar and teacher with deep experience working with undergraduates and a strong commitment to the college.

    He said Khurana is a "distinguished scholar of organizational behavior and leadership" and a dynamic house master who has also deeply engaged with undergraduate issues on important committees.

    "He brings to the deanship an intimate understanding of the Harvard College experience," Smith said.

    Harvard Business School's India-born Dean Nitin Nohria also welcomed Khurana's appointment saying his selection is a testament to his skill and vision as a teacher and scholar.

    "I think the appointment is wonderful news, and I am looking forward to working with Rakesh to identify and strengthen efforts across the College and HBS that will be

    sumitra likes this.

  3. #3
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    85,067

    Re: VRI Corner

    Neel Kashkari, Indian-American of Kashmiri origin, to run for California governor's post

    When Neel Kashkari was drafted by the Bush administration in 2008 to oversee the massive bailout program following the mortgage meltdown, an online wiseacre quipped: "Seriously? The guy overseeing the $700 billion is named 'CashCarry'?"

    On Tuesday, after declaring he will be running for governor of California, the 40-year old Indian-American whose parents emigrated from Kashmir will be hoping the name resonates with contributors and donors — not to speak of voters — whose help he will need to win America's biggest gubernatorial prize.

    With little political experience and public exposure beyond the high-profile he had during the bailout crisis, he faces incumbent governor Jerry Brown, a formidable and well-heeled Democrat who already has $ 17 million in the kitty. If he succeeds, he will be the third US governor of Indian-origin, after Louisiana's Bobby Jindal and South Carolina's Nikki Haley, who are also Republicans.

    Kashkari, who was born in Akron, Ohio, and lives in Laguna Beach, California, announced his intention to run in a speech at California State University, Sacramento. He cited California's public schools and economy as his motivation for running, declaring that status quo is unacceptable.




    "Today, the gift of a good education and the opportunity it creates are out of reach for millions of struggling Californians...That's why I'm running for governor: To create jobs and give kids a quality education. Jobs and education. That's it. That's my platform," he said.

    Kashkari will first need to get past fellow Republican challenger and California assembly member, Tim Donnelly, a tea party favorite and staunch social conservative. No Republican has won statewide office in California since 2006 when Arnold Schwarzenegger faded away. A December 2013 Field Poll found that fewer than 10% of Californians would vote for Kashkari, compared to 52% for Brown, and 80% were unfamiliar with him.

    Kashkari's already put together a campaign team that includes political consultants who advised Republican presidential candidates Mitt Romney and John McCain and former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Money shouldn't be a major issue considering his strong Wall Street connections, although money doesn't buy California governorship. Former eBay CEO Meg Whitman spent $144 million on her campaign and lost to Brown in a landslide in 2010.

    A long-time understudy and associate of former treasure secretary Henry Paulson going back to their days at Goldman Sachs, Kashkari was nominated and confirmed as assistant secretary at the tail-end of the Bush administration's eight-year run in office to rescue the country from the mortgage doldrums.

    "It seems a curious time to appoint a young acolyte from "The Firm" (Goldman Sachs) to run one of the most critical financial rescue programs in US history," the Financial Times' blog Alphaville observed at that time. "There is a small matter of experience. He is 35 years old and will, as the Wall Street Journal points out, gain a 'position of substantial power' overseeing Treasury's effort to buy the financial industry's bad loans and other distressed securities."

    But from all accounts he acquitted himself well before leaving the government in May 2009 although the bailout was anathema to many Republicans. His role was portrayed in the television drama Too Big To Fail.

    Compared to that monumental bailout task, this shot at governorship, with a primary run that will cost only about $10 million, will seem like a picnic. The big challenge will come if he gets past the primaries.

    Neel Kashkari's parents, Chaman and Sheila Kashkari, are Indian immigrants originally from J&K, who took the well-trodden academic route to the US. Chaman Kashkari, who taught at the University of Akron, is now a retired professor of engineering, and Sheila Kashkari is a pathologist.

    Neel himself has a bachelor's degree in engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (birthplace of the original internet browser Mosaic) and went to earn a master's degree in aerospace engineering to initially take up a career in sciences. He worked as the R&D principal investigator at the company TRW in Redondo Beach, California, where he developed technology for Nasa space science missions such as James Webb Space Telescope, the replacement for Hubble.

    sumitra likes this.

  4. #4
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    85,067

    Re: VRI Corner

    Indian woman scientist's portrait to be exhibited in Britain

    Sunetra Gupta, an India-born chemist and physicist has joined the big league of female scientists like Marie Curie in a first-of-its-kind art exhibition at the prestigious Royal Society here.

    Gupta, who was born in Kolkata and is now a professor at Oxford University, is among an exclusive group as part of the "Women in Science Portrait Exhibition" of the greatest female fellows of the Royal Society together with newly-commissioned drawings featuring Royal Society Research Fellows.

    "It is a great honour to have my portrait included in this show," said Gupta, a professor of theoretical epidemiology at the University of Oxford's department of zoology, working on infectious diseases.

    Her main area of interest is the evolution of diversity in pathogens, with particular reference to the infectious disease agents that are responsible for malaria, influenza and bacterial meningitis.

    "The position of women in science is being increasingly viewed as a rational problem requiring scientific methodologies to understand and improve, and I am happy to be part of such a project," she said.

    She has a parallel career as a novelist as well and has written five acclaimed novels.

    Gupta grew up in Calcutta of the 1970s and 80s and wrote her first works of fiction in Bengali. She is also an accomplished translator of the poetry by Rabindranath Tagore.

    "Sunetra's childhood and her family's peripatetic lifestyle have had a great impact on her work, her early years were spent moving between Ethiopia, Zambia and England" said the Royal Society.

    "When she was 11, the family returned to Calcutta, a city which continues to inspire her writing," it said in reference to the writer-scientist behind acclaimed works such as "Moonlight into Marzipan" and "The Glassblower's Breath".

    Her fifth novel, "So Good in Black", was published in 2009 the same year in which she won the Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award for her scientific achievements.

    The Royal Society display uses portraits by a range of artists to celebrate a few of the leading women in science titled — "does it make a difference?" including nutritionist Elsie Widdowson, astro-biologist Zita Martins among others.

    The show has been curated by Uta Frith, a leading British developmental psychologist.

    "Women in science have an image problem. It is not so much deciding whether they should aspire to the hard image of being a scientist or the soft image of being feminine, it is the more serious problem of invisibility," Frith said.

    "This exhibition, part of the Royal Society's Summer Science Exhibition and one of the many activities it is undertaking to promote and increase diversity both at the society and within the scientific community, includes loans of works and, for the first time, commissioned d

    sumitra likes this.

  5. #5
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    85,067

    Re: VRI Corner

    Indian woman scientist's portrait to be exhibited in Britain

    Sunetra Gupta, an India-born chemist and physicist has joined the big league of female scientists like Marie Curie in a first-of-its-kind art exhibition at the prestigious Royal Society here.

    Gupta, who was born in Kolkata and is now a professor at Oxford University, is among an exclusive group as part of the "Women in Science Portrait Exhibition" of the greatest female fellows of the Royal Society together with newly-commissioned drawings featuring Royal Society Research Fellows.

    "It is a great honour to have my portrait included in this show," said Gupta, a professor of theoretical epidemiology at the University of Oxford's department of zoology, working on infectious diseases.

    Her main area of interest is the evolution of diversity in pathogens, with particular reference to the infectious disease agents that are responsible for malaria, influenza and bacterial meningitis.

    "The position of women in science is being increasingly viewed as a rational problem requiring scientific methodologies to understand and improve, and I am happy to be part of such a project," she said.

    She has a parallel career as a novelist as well and has written five acclaimed novels.

    Gupta grew up in Calcutta of the 1970s and 80s and wrote her first works of fiction in Bengali. She is also an accomplished translator of the poetry by Rabindranath Tagore.

    "Sunetra's childhood and her family's peripatetic lifestyle have had a great impact on her work, her early years were spent moving between Ethiopia, Zambia and England" said the Royal Society.

    "When she was 11, the family returned to Calcutta, a city which continues to inspire her writing," it said in reference to the writer-scientist behind acclaimed works such as "Moonlight into Marzipan" and "The Glassblower's Breath".

    Her fifth novel, "So Good in Black", was published in 2009 the same year in which she won the Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award for her scientific achievements.

    The Royal Society display uses portraits by a range of artists to celebrate a few of the leading women in science titled "does it make a difference?" including nutritionist Elsie Widdowson, astro-biologist Zita Martins among others.

    The show has been curated by Uta Frith, a leading British developmental psychologist.

    "Women in science have an image problem. It is not so much deciding whether they should aspire to the hard image of being a scientist or the soft image of being feminine, it is the more serious problem of invisibility," Frith said.

    "This exhibition, part of the Royal Society's Summer Science Exhibition and one of the many activities it is undertaking to promote and increase diversity both at the society and within the scientific community, includes loans of works and, for the first time, commissioned d

    sumitra likes this.

  6. #6
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    85,067

    Re: VRI Corner

    Indian-origin scientist chosen for UN's highest environmental award

    An Indian-origin scientist, who proved how cutting emissions of "black carbon" or soot can significantly lessen the impact of climate change, has been selected for the United Nation's top environmental award.

    A statement issued by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on Tuesday said Veerabhadran Ramanathan of Scripps Institution of Oceanography in California is to receive the 2013 " Champions of the Earth award", the UN's highest environmental award.

    In 1997, he had co-led an international research team that first discovered the climate impact in Asia of widespread air pollution, known as the atmospheric brown cloud (ABC).

    The prize is awarded annually to leaders from government, civil society and the private sector, whose actions have had a significant and positive impact on the environment.

    "I am very honoured to accept this prestigious award, which recognizes the critical role of science and research in addressing the major environmental challenges of our time," Professor Ramanathan said in the statement.

    A major UNEP study in 2011 of which Ramanathan acted as vice-chairman, presented 16 actions to cut black carbon and methane emissions, which, if implemented, would save close to 2.5 million lives a year through reduced respiratory illnesses, avoid crop losses amounting to 32 million tonnes annually, and deliver near-term climate protection of about 0.5 degree C by 2050.

    Ramanathan's studies on the climate warming effects of non-CO2 pollutants dates back to 1975, when he discovered the super greenhouse effect of a class of halocarbons known as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).

    Translating his research into action, he had started "Project Surya" in India to phase out inefficient cooking stoves.

    The report estimated that implementing these measures would help keep average global temperature rise below the internationally-agreed 2 degree C target, at least until mid-century.

    sumitra likes this.

  7. #7
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    85,067

    Re: VRI Corner

    British Indian woman brings home-cooking to London doorsteps

    Nostalgia for her own mother's home-cooked meals has led British Indian professional Shelina Dhuna to set up her own food business in London.


    Indian Home Cooks offers an innovative home-delivery-cum-catering service that provides authentic home-cooked Indian food at doorsteps, anywhere in London.

    "As anyone who is away from home misses their mum's home-cooked food, I felt there was a major gap in the market for authentic traditional Indian cooking that can be accessed at a reasonable price and at your convenience," says company director Dhuna, who was working as a media professional with Sky TV before taking the plunge into the entrepreneurial world recently.

    "The market in Britain is under-served when it comes to fresh, healthy, authentic take-out Indian food. People are time-poor and want food at their own convenience, but are conscious about eating healthy, freshly cooked food, at accessible prices.

    Indian Home Cooks, launched in February 2013, fills this gap by delivering freshly home-cooked dishes made from traditional, authentic, delicious Indian recipes and cooked using a high standard by experienced chefs at takeaway prices," she adds.

    Alongside home deliveries, Indian Home Cooks' chefs provide catering for dinner parties, special occasions and corporate events. The concept revolves around a portal for chefs to advertise their home delivery and/or catering services.

    Customers can view these carefully selected chefs' profiles and menus online and then order from them directly through the Indian Home Cooks website. They range from professionals to housewives working part time and offer a variety of cuisines from different regions of India.

    While the chefs gain access to a broader London-wide customer platform, Indian Home Cooks get a 20 per cent commission on each order.

    "The key USP (unique selling proposition) of the service is fresh, home-cooked food using locally-sourced ingredients, minimal oil/salt and no artificial flavours or colours. Dishes, very affordably priced, are cooked by experienced chefs to a high standard and in accordance with specific dietary requirements," Dhuna explains.

    After an initial London base, she plans to expand Indian Home Cooks to other regions across the UK.

    "Indian cuisine remains one of the most popular cuisines in the UK. I think this is because over the years many Indian dishes have been adapted to British taste-buds. However, I think we are starting to see a shift where people are realising just how delicious traditional home-cooked Indian cuisine is and once they are introduced to it, they love it."

    As a professional who has been working across various sectors, including medical, information technology and recruitment, Dhuna's Punjabi roots have always drawn her towards traditional Indian cuisine.

    sumitra likes this.

  8. #8
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    85,067

    Re: VRI Corner

    Young Indian-American girl appointed to United States Military Academy at West Point

    It has been a long road from the small village in India where her parents were born, and her life began, but immigrating to the United States of America, becoming a naturalized American citizen, and on the cusp of becoming, perhaps, the first generation Indian woman cadet at the United States Military Academy at West Point, in the Academy's prestigious 211-year history, is a "dream come true", for a 18 year old Avon, Connecticut young lady. Sneha Singh, daughter of Amar Singh of Avon, is proof that hard work, discipline, a positive mental attitude, and remaining patient and focused, can result in turning dreams into reality. Sneha, a 2013 Avon High School graduate, will enter the prestigious United States Military Academy at West Point, on July 1st. Sneha will begin a 47 month odyssey that will culminate with a Bachelor of Science degree and a commission as a second lieutenant in the United States Army. Sneha hopes to pursue her dream of becoming a medical doctor and plans to study in a major that will prepare her for applying to medical school.

    Sneha's appointment, by the directorate of admissions board at West Point, on behalf of the President of the United States, culminated a long journey, beginning in Sneha's junior year of high school when she officially opened an admissions file at West Point. A turning point for Sneha was attending the West Point Summer Leadership Experience, a "one week" summer program that West Point offers to the top high school juniors in the country. During that experience, Sneha was able to experience "first hand", Army life. She rose at 5am for physical training, marched to all of her activities, wore a uniform, communicated with her leadership utilizing military protocol, and experienced basic military training (which included a land obstacle course, an introduction to combatives; a form of military wrestling, and firing the Army M4 rifle in a laser simulation center). Sneha also had the opportunity to attend academic classes, social functions, participate in group sports, and at the conclusion of the seminar, be honored in a formal graduation ceremony. The bonds that Sneha formed with her fellow teammates enhanced her desire to serve her country.

    West Point Field Force Admissions representative major Nancy Bates, who is also a West Point graduate, met with Sneha and her parents during the admissions process and served as a mentor during Sneha's candidacy. Major Bates explained the characteristics that West Point seeks in cadet candidates and why Sneha was such an exceptional young lady and pleasure to work with:

    "West Point evaluates each candidate utilizing a "whole person" concept. Over 15,400 young men and women applied during this past admission cycle, but in a typical year, only approximately 1,200 will ultimately be offered admission. Of those 1,200 candidates, approximately 200 will be women. It is a VERY competitive process. Each candidate offered admission must receive a nomination from his/her member of Congress, or a Presidential nomination (for service related candidates). Sneha received a nomination, last fall, from both United States Senator Joseph Lieberman and Connecticut 5th District Congressman Christopher Murphy. The nomination process involved submitting an extensive application package and a formal panel interview.

    In addition to each candidate receiving a Congressional or Presidential nomination, they must be qualified academically, medically and pass a rigorous candidate fitness assessment. Furthermore, each candidate must demonstrate leadership skills, through clubs, teams or organizations where they lead, as well as follow. Finally, each offered candidate must successfully pass a background investigation through law enforcement. In essence, West Point strives to identify candidates that are well rounded, given the difficulty and challenges of the West Point experience. West Point cadets must possess strength of body, strength of mind, and strength of character. Sneha particularly impressed me, not only because of her diverse and accomplished background, but her humble upbringing, maturity, dynamic and personable nature, infectious enthusiasm and positive mental attitude. Some candidates may be a "fit" for West Point, in terms of their background, but may not "fit in", in terms of melding with the unique environment. After working with Sneha, I have absolutely no reservation that she will thrive at the academy."

    Academically, Sneha was a top tier graduate in her 2013 high school graduating class, a National Honor Society member, and aggressively mastered Advanced Placement (college level) courses in Calculus, Statistics, Physics, Literature and Latin.

    Athletically, Sneha was the team captain of her high school track team and also received several varsity letters. She was also a member of her high school marching and Jazz band. Her leadership accomplishments included being a delegate to Girls State, and serving in class leadership and officer positions in various school clubs. In her spare time, Sneha volunteered within her community and was actively involved in figure skating. Her outside interests include classical piano, writing short stories, designing computer games, and spending time with friends. In her study of American history, Sneha drew inspiration from Eleanor Roosevelt, and her memorable quote "Believe in yourself. You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you stop to look fear in the face......You must do which you think you cannot do!"




    Despite these impressive accomplishments, receiving the appointment to West Point; a full scholarship valued at over several hundred thousand dollars, would not have been possible, without the leadership, love and guidance provided by her parents. Sneha credits her father and mother with providing her the values, moral compass, work ethic and discipline, to enable her to achieve her dream. "It was my decision, and my decision alone, to attend the Academy and pursue a career as an Army Officer," Sneha explains, "but without the love and support of my parents, I wouldn't have reached this important milestone in my life."

    In accepting the West Point appointment, Sneha has committed the next 12 years of her life, in service to this country. Following her 4 years at the academy, Sneha will serve on active duty for a minimum of five years, and then an additional three years in a Reserve/National Guard unit.

    Sneha's final few weeks before "R" Day (Reception Day) will be spent with family and friends, while continuing to prepare physically and mentally for the challenges she will face during Cadet Basic Training and plebe year (West Point's freshman year). In a few weeks, Sneha will grip hands with the members of the Long Gray Line, which came before her, but also leave a legacy for young women that choose to follow in her footsteps.

    Notable members of the Long Gray Line include military Generals such as: Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S Grant, George Custer, William Tecumseh Sherman, Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, John "Black Jack" Pershing, George S. Patton Jr., Dwight D Eisenhower, Matthew Ridgway, Douglas MacArthur, Omar Bradley, Henry "Hap" Arnold, Creighton Abrams, Alexander Haig, Maxwell Taylor, and H Norman Schwarzkopf. Countless others, following military service, have had distinguished careers in business, medicine, law, sports, politics, and science. This includes 18 astronauts such as Frank Borman and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin; George Washington Goethals (architect of the Panama Canal) Robert McDonald (chairman and CEO of Proctor and Gamble), James Kimsey (Founder of America Online) Mike Krzyzewski (head men's basketball coach at Duke) and Pete Dawkins (Heisman Trophy recipient and accomplished business executive). Several graduates are members of Congress.

    What specific path Sneha Singh will travel over the next few decades has yet to be charted, but one thing remains certain as a chiseled stone....Sneha will succeed and her legacy as a future member of the Long Gray line will be remembered, and serve as a reminder that America is a beacon of hope and opportunity for immigrants from all corners of the earth.

    sumitra likes this.

  9. #9
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    85,067

    Re: VRI Corner

    Chennai-born Indian-American elected to Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Subra Suresh, Chennai-born Indian-American president of Carnegie Mellon University, has been elected a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), a rare and highly coveted distinction within the academic fraternity.

    The head of the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania based university, Suresh, 57, was chosen for his scientific contributions in materials science and engineering, including his work connecting nano-mechanical cell structure to disease states, according to the university.

    He was also honoured for his leadership in building the worldwide scientific and engineering research dialogue through the Global Research Council, which he helped to found while director of the US National Science Foundation. The council will have its annual meeting in May 2014 in Beijing.

    Suresh is one of nine foreign members elected in 2013 to CAS, a prestigious national advisory body for the Chinese government. They will be honoured at the 17th General Assembly of the CAS in June 2014 in Beijing.

    He is the only current US university president to have been named a foreign member of the CAS and a member of all three US National Academies - the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Engineering and National Academy of Sciences

    Born in Chennai in 1956, Suresh earned his Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras.

    He then came to the US and earned his master's degree from Iowa State University, and his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

    He did his post-doctoral research at the University of California at Berkeley, specifically the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

    President Barack Obama nominated Suresh to be director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in June of 2010. He became Carnegie Mellon's ninth president on July 1 last year.

    sumitra likes this.

  10. #10
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    85,067

    Re: VRI Corner

    Canada names park after first Sikh settler

    To commemorate contribution of Sikhs in Canada's development, the country has named a new park in the city of Calgary after the legendary farmer Harnam Singh Hari, the first Sikh to tame the harsh climes of frigid Alberta province in 1909.

    Alberta's minister of human services Manmeet Singh Bhullar, who was in Amritsar on Tuesday, told TOI that the park was dedicated to Hari and his family, who identified fertile farmland and set the pace of agricultural progress in the province. Manmeet accompanied Alberta premier Alison Redford on an official visit to India to set up a trade office for his province in Delhi.

    With plans to enhance trade and investment opportunities between Alberta and Punjab, the two visited the Golden Temple on Monday to pay obeisance. Bhullar spoke about Sikhs' selfless service in Canada. "We have wings named after Guru Nanak Dev in almost all major hospitals in the country. Sikhs are enjoying great prosperity because of principles learnt from their forefathers, teachings of Gurus and inspiration from the divine," he said.

    In reply to a question about Canada's province of Quebec where the Parti Quebecois government is likely to introduce a bill to regulate religious symbolism, Bhullar said, "Even if they introduce the bill, Canadian Charter will overrule it as it has always protected minority religious and equality rights."

    Redford told media that she has signed two MoUs with Punjab government to boost cooperation and enhance trade and investment activities between the two states. "These agreements are focused on agriculture and animal genetics and would help increase trade in dairy production and piggery. Setting up of an agricultural working group is in the pipeline to encourage communication on projects of importance," said the Alberta premier.

    Alberta Premier woos Punjabis

    Impressed with the institution of langar (community kitchen), Alison Redford served the devotees in the Golden Temple on Tuesday. "In Alberta, I have visited many temples but visiting Golden Temple, and to see the same spirit of service and worship was an honour," Alison remarked. Referring to Redford's keenness in langar, Bhullar, in a lighter vein, said, "Alberta is a major producer of lentils and she got to see where the lentils from Canada go - in feeding tens of thousands of people every day."

    According to Redford, "India is not only a big market for lentils and other products, but there's also a close commercial relationship between people in Punjab and Alberta." She also said that Alberta's large Sikh community contributes actively to political, social and business activities and thus, help making the province one of the best place to live, work and raise a family.

    sumitra likes this.

loading...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Like It?
Share It!







Follow Penmai on Twitter