Vaginal Birth After C-section is commonly called VBAC. This is a process where pregnant mom can opt for the vaginal delivery for the next baby after had c-section for the Previous baby. The Chance of being successful is higher if you donot have any issue this time unlike last time which made you opt for c-section.

What would make me a good candidate for a VBAC?

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, you're a good candidate for a vaginal birth after a c-section if you meet all of the following criteria:
  • Your previous cesarean incision was a low-transverse uterine incision (which is horizontal) rather than a vertical incision in your upper uterus (known as a "classical" incision) or T-shaped, which would put you at higher risk for uterine rupture. (Note that the type of scar on your belly may not match the one on your uterus.)
  • Your pelvis seems large enough to allow your baby to pass through safely. (While there's no way to know this for sure, your practitioner can examine your pelvis and make an educated guess.)
  • You've never had any other extensive uterine surgery, such as a myomectomy to remove fibroids.
  • You've never had a uterine rupture.
  • You have no medical condition or obstetric problem (such as a placenta previa or a large fibroid) that would make a vaginal delivery risky.
  • There's a physician on site who can monitor your labor and perform an emergency c-section if necessary.
  • There's an anesthesiologist, other medical personnel, and equipment available around-the-clock to handle an emergency situation for you or your baby.
Factors that would work against your having a successful VBAC include:
  • Being an older mom
  • Having a high body mass index (BMI)
  • Having a baby with a high birth weight (over 4,000 grams, about 8.8 pounds)
  • Having your pregnancy go beyond 40 weeks of gestation
  • Having a short time between pregnancies (18 months or less)
Talk with your practitioner about your individual chance of success and carefully weigh the benefits and the risks.

Source Babycenter(dot)com

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