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Toilet Training Your Child


Discussions on "Toilet Training Your Child" in "Preschooler" forum.


  1. #1
    silentsounds's Avatar
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    Toilet Training Your Child

    Toilet Training Your Child

    When should I start toilet training my child?

    Do not start toilet training until both you and your child are ready. You are ready when you are able to devote the time and energy necessary to encourage your child on a daily.

    Signs that your child is ready include the following:



    • Your child signals that his or her diaper is wet or soiled.
    • Your child seems interested in the potty chair or toilet.
    • Your child says that he or she would like to go to the potty.
    • Your child understands and follows basic instructions.
    • Your child feels uncomfortable if his or her diaper is wet or soiled.
    • Your child stays dry for periods of 2 hours or longer during the day.
    • Your child wakes up from naps with a dry diaper.
    • Your child can pull his or her pants down and then up again.

    You may start noticing these signs when your child is 18 to 24 months of age. However, it is not uncommon for a child to still be in diapers at 2 and a half to 3 years of age.

    How should I prepare my child for toilet training?

    Allow your child to be present when you go to the bathroom and make your child feel comfortable in the bathroom. Allow your child to see urine and bowel movements in the toilet. Let your child practice flushing the toilet.

    Before toilet training your child, place a potty chair in your child's normal living and play area so that your child will become familiar with the potty. Consider placing a potty chair on each floor of the house if you live in a multilevel home. Allow your child to observe, touch and become familiar with the potty chair.

    Tell your child that the potty chair is his or her own chair. Allow your child to sit fully clothed on the potty chair, as if it were a regular chair. Allow your child to leave the potty chair at any time. Do not force your child to spend time sitting on the chair.

    After your child has become used to the potty chair and sits on it regularly with his or her clothes on, try having your child sit on the potty without wearing pants and a diaper. Let your child become comfortable with sitting on the potty without wearing pants and a diaper.

    The next step is to show your child how the potty chair is used. Place stool from a dirty diaper into the potty chair. Allow your child to observe the transfer of the bowel movement from the potty chair into the toilet. Let your child flush the toilet and watch the bowel movement disappear down the toilet.



    How do I teach my child to use the toilet?

    After your child has become comfortable with flushing the toilet and sitting on the potty chair, you may begin teaching your child to go to the bathroom. Keep your child in loose, easily removable pants.

    Place your child on the potty chair whenever he or she signals the need to go to the bathroom. Your child's facial expression may change when he or she feels the need to urinate or to have a bowel movement. Your child may stop any activity he or she is engaged in when he or she feels the need to go to the bathroom.

    Most children have a bowel movement once a day, usually within an hour after eating. Most children urinate within an hour after having a large drink.

    In addition to watching for signals that your child needs to urinate or have a bowel movement, place your child on the potty at regular intervals. This may be as often as every 1 and a half to 2 hours.

    Stay with your child when he or she is on the potty chair. Reading or talking to your child when he or she is sitting on the potty may help your child relax. Praise your child when he or she goes to the bathroom in the potty chair, but do not express disappointment if your child does not urinate or have a bowel movement in the potty. Be patient with your child.

    Once your child has learned to use the potty chair, your child can begin using an over-the-toilet seat and a step-up stool.



    What about training pants?

    Doctors disagree about whether to use disposable training pants. Some think that training pants may confuse children and make them think it is okay to use them like diapers. This may slow the toilet training process. Others think training pants may be a helpful step when you are training your child. Sometimes, training pants are used at nighttime, when it is more difficult for a child to control his or her bladder.

    What if my child has an accident?

    Your child may have an occasional accident even after he or she learns how to use the toilet. Sometimes, children get too involved in activities and forget that they need to use the bathroom. Suggesting regular trips to the bathroom may help prevent some accidents.

    If your child does have an accident, stay calm. Do not punish your child. Simply change your child and continue to encourage your child to use the potty chair.


    How long will it take to toilet train my child?

    Every child is different. It may take as long as 3 to 6 months for your child to be toilet trained during daytime. It may take longer to teach your child to use the toilet during nighttime when his or her bladder control is reduced. It is important for you to be patient and supportive. If after a few months, your child is still resisting or having difficulties with toilet training, talk to your family doctor. The most likely reason your child has not learned to use the potty is that your child is not yet ready for toilet training.
    When should I start toilet training my child?

    Do not start toilet training until both you and your child are ready. You are ready when you are able to devote the time and energy necessary to encourage your child on a daily.

    Signs that your child is ready include the following:



    • Your child signals that his or her diaper is wet or soiled.
    • Your child seems interested in the potty chair or toilet.
    • Your child says that he or she would like to go to the potty.
    • Your child understands and follows basic instructions.
    • Your child feels uncomfortable if his or her diaper is wet or soiled.
    • Your child stays dry for periods of 2 hours or longer during the day.
    • Your child wakes up from naps with a dry diaper.
    • Your child can pull his or her pants down and then up again.

    You may start noticing these signs when your child is 18 to 24 months of age. However, it is not uncommon for a child to still be in diapers at 2 and a half to 3 years of age.

    How should I prepare my child for toilet training?

    Allow your child to be present when you go to the bathroom and make your child feel comfortable in the bathroom. Allow your child to see urine and bowel movements in the toilet. Let your child practice flushing the toilet.

    Before toilet training your child, place a potty chair in your child's normal living and play area so that your child will become familiar with the potty. Consider placing a potty chair on each floor of the house if you live in a multilevel home. Allow your child to observe, touch and become familiar with the potty chair.

    Tell your child that the potty chair is his or her own chair. Allow your child to sit fully clothed on the potty chair, as if it were a regular chair. Allow your child to leave the potty chair at any time. Do not force your child to spend time sitting on the chair.

    After your child has become used to the potty chair and sits on it regularly with his or her clothes on, try having your child sit on the potty without wearing pants and a diaper. Let your child become comfortable with sitting on the potty without wearing pants and a diaper.

    The next step is to show your child how the potty chair is used. Place stool from a dirty diaper into the potty chair. Allow your child to observe the transfer of the bowel movement from the potty chair into the toilet. Let your child flush the toilet and watch the bowel movement disappear down the toilet.






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    Guna (குணா)

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  2. #2
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    Re: Toilet Training Your Child

    How do I teach my child to use the toilet?

    After your child has become comfortable with flushing the toilet and sitting on the potty chair, you may begin teaching your child to go to the bathroom. Keep your child in loose, easily removable pants.

    Place your child on the potty chair whenever he or she signals the need to go to the bathroom. Your child's facial expression may change when he or she feels the need to urinate or to have a bowel movement. Your child may stop any activity he or she is engaged in when he or she feels the need to go to the bathroom.

    Most children have a bowel movement once a day, usually within an hour after eating. Most children urinate within an hour after having a large drink.

    In addition to watching for signals that your child needs to urinate or have a bowel movement, place your child on the potty at regular intervals. This may be as often as every 1 and a half to 2 hours.

    Stay with your child when he or she is on the potty chair. Reading or talking to your child when he or she is sitting on the potty may help your child relax. Praise your child when he or she goes to the bathroom in the potty chair, but do not express disappointment if your child does not urinate or have a bowel movement in the potty. Be patient with your child.

    Once your child has learned to use the potty chair, your child can begin using an over-the-toilet seat and a step-up stool.


    Return to top
    What about training pants?

    Doctors disagree about whether to use disposable training pants. Some think that training pants may confuse children and make them think it is okay to use them like diapers. This may slow the toilet training process. Others think training pants may be a helpful step when you are training your child. Sometimes, training pants are used at nighttime, when it is more difficult for a child to control his or her bladder.
    Return to top
    What if my child has an accident?

    Your child may have an occasional accident even after he or she learns how to use the toilet. Sometimes, children get too involved in activities and forget that they need to use the bathroom. Suggesting regular trips to the bathroom may help prevent some accidents.

    If your child does have an accident, stay calm. Do not punish your child. Simply change your child and continue to encourage your child to use the potty chair.

    Return to top
    How long will it take to toilet train my child?

    Every child is different. It may take as long as 3 to 6 months for your child to be toilet trained during daytime. It may take longer to teach your child to use the toilet during nighttime when his or her bladder control is reduced. It is important for you to be patient and supportive. If after a few months, your child is still resisting or having difficulties with toilet training, talk to your family doctor. The most likely reason your child has not learned to use the potty is that your child is not yet ready for toilet training.


    sumitra likes this.
    Guna (குணா)

    நினைப்பில் தூய்மையும், சொல்லில் உண்மையும்
    மிகவும் அவசியமானவை








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    how to toilet train my baby

    my son is now 1.3 mnths old. how to toilet train him? is this is too early or this is correct age to train him. help me i don't know how to train him.

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    Re: how to toilet train my baby

    Dear Malliga Chandran, I understand your doubt. Recently I happend to read an article which I am reproducing here for your information. If it is useful and answer your doubts I am happy. Try to read fully in your leisure hours and take note of important things to enable you to put the same into use.




    What is infant potty training?


    Also called "elimination communication" or "natural infant hygiene," infant potty training is the practice of introducing your baby to the toilet or potty at a very early age usually between birth and 4 months.

    Some parents who do this avoid diapers completely by racing their baby to the nearest bathroom whenever they anticipate a poop or pee. Others use diapers on and off. By 18 months, in most cases, their children have "graduated" that is, they know when they have to use the toilet and get themselves there successfully.

    In contrast, studies show the average baby boy in the United States can stay dry during the day and use the bathroom reliably at 39 months and the average girl at 35 months. (It typically takes eight to ten months for a child to go from complete reliance on diapers to being fully potty trained, the study found.)

    While the notion of potty training a very young infant seems radical to many American parents, it's not a new idea. Before 1950, most children in the United States were toilet trained by 18 months. And today, most African, Asian, and European babies are trained well before their second birthday.

    So why are American babies and their parents so attached to their diapers? Many think it's due in part to the changing views of experts about toilet training, as well as the invention of disposable diapers.

    In the 1950s, pediatrician Benjamin Spock and other experts began advocating a more relaxed approach to toilet training. Then, in the 1960s, pediatrician and parenting expert T. Berry Brazelton advocated an even gentler, more "child-centered" philosophy: He encouraged parents to allow children to follow their own timetable when it came to giving up diapers.

    Brazelton's view caught on around the same time as disposable diapers, which tend to be more comfortable for babies (they're so absorbent that babies don't feel wet) and easier for parents to deal with. Against this backdrop, it's no surprise that the average age of toilet training crept up.



    What are the advantages of infant potty training?

    There's little scientific data on toilet training in general, much less on infant potty training. But proponents claim many advantages:

    It promotes parent-baby bonding. Advocates assert that infant potty training brings you closer to your baby. Because you're constantly watching your baby for signs of being about to eliminate, they say, you become more in tune with his needs. Says Jennifer Lynch, a mother of two (both potty trained as infants), "The best thing about it is that you're more connected to your kid. There's this 'conversation' you're having with your 3-month-old."

    It's more comfortable for your baby. Infant potty training advocates believe that babies often cry and fuss because of diaper discomfort, even when they're wearing disposables, and that you can spare your baby rashes by allowing him to go diaper-free.

    It allows your baby to exert his growing independence. As he becomes more mobile and starts wanting to do things his own way, it can be easier to encourage him to "crawl to the potty" or "go use the big boy toilet" on his own than to engage in daily diaper change battles.

    It reduces diaper waste. In 2009, Americans dumped nearly 4 million tons of disposable diapers into landfills. Using fewer cloth diapers helps the environment, too, since those require energy and other resources for washing and delivery. And reducing your diaper use isn't just good for the earth; it's a nice break for your family's budget.

    It's normal and natural. Infant potty training mimics the time-worn practices of women in parts of Africa and Asia, where mothers often carry around their undiapered babies. These moms manage to avoid being soiled by their bare-bottomed children by learning to anticipate their elimination needs: When a mom notices a signal or pattern that suggests her child is about to relieve himself, she holds him away from her body.

    In the United States, proponents of the method aim to get their baby quickly to a potty. Laurie Boucke, author of several books on infant potty training, explains, "It's not as if your baby is running around peeing and pooping everywhere. The method is very hygienic."

    And it doesn't require an unrealistic amount of attentiveness, says Elizabeth Parise, a spokesperson for DiaperFreeBaby and mother of five (two of them potty trained as infants). "You don't have to sit home and stare at your baby all day looking for signs. The awareness just becomes part of your routine the same way you notice signals that your baby's hungry or sleepy."



    Does it work?

    That depends on what you mean by "work." If your goal is to use fewer diapers and get your baby practicing a skill that he'll certainly use later, the answer is yes. If your goal is to have a young baby who never needs diapers again and never has an accident, the answer is probably no.

    Given parents' success stories, some babies apparently can learn to read their bodies' signals and get themselves to the potty as soon as they're mobile but undoubtedly others will need more time to develop the skill (or, perhaps, the interest). There's no way to know how it'll go for your child unless you give it a try.


    How can I get started?

    It's best to start between birth and 4 months, according to those who've used infant potty training. (If you start with an older child, it may take longer for him to learn, as he'll have to "unlearn" his diapering behavior.) Here are the basic steps:

    Watch your baby and get to know his elimination patterns. When and how often does your baby go to the bathroom? Does he always go at a particular time of day right after waking up, for example? Does he make any particular noises, gestures, or expressions when he has to go?

    When your baby makes one of his typical elimination signs, hold him gently over a toilet, a potty, or even a bucket or pot, which may better suit his tiny size.

    While he's relieving himself, make a noise that your baby will learn to associate with elimination (many parents use ssssss or some other waterlike sound; others use a word or phrase like "go potty").

    Repeat this sound or phrase whenever you see that your baby has to go, and also while he's going, so he'll learn to recognize it as a signal and connect his own impulses with the act of using the potty.

    When an accident happens, be matter-of-fact about it and stay relaxed. Advocate and mother of five Parise says your attitude helps your child stay relaxed about the process, too.

    During the nighttime, keep a potty right by the bed and put your baby on it before nursing or if he's restless during the night. Some advocates say that babies rarely pee or poop during a deep sleep and will usually become restless or give some sort of sign sufficient to wake a parent when they need to go assuming that you're co-sleeping. (Other advocates say that using diapers at night is fine. Even self-proclaimed infant potty training "evangelist" Lynch admits, "In our house, sleep trumps pee.") If you opt to put your baby down sans diaper, place him on a waterproof mattress pad in case of an accident.

    Be flexible. You don't have to be a purist to practice infant potty training. As mentioned above, it's fine to use diapers sometimes (at night, or when you're out, for instance) if it makes life easier. If you can, use cloth diapers, since disposables are so absorbent that your baby often won't realize when he's wet or soiled.

    Stay positive. Avoid using pressure or punishment. However and whenever your child learns to use the potty, training should be gentle and positive, and done with a sense of humor. The goal is to help your child get in tune with his body and feel good about using the potty.

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    Re: how to toilet train my baby


    Hi Malliga,

    This is a very important question asked by a young mother. Every mother can follow your thought of toilet - training their young children.

    Whatever Sumitra has said, is correct.

    This is the correct time of your child, to train.

    Initially, for every 1 hour, you can take your child to the REST ROOM and ask your child to pass urine. In 1 or 2 days, the child will get accustomed to the practice. This time (1 Hour ) depends on the climate. If it is cold climate, the frequency for the child's urge may be 1/2 an hour or 45 min.

    When the child is practiced to pass urine only in the toilet, later in another few days/months, he himself will call you to the Rest room, during his urge. You can continue this even during the night hours.

    Next, regarding the motion, you may be knowing about the time of your child's potty activity. For 1 or 2 days, when he is starting the activity, you can lift him to the Rest room, (due to this hindrance, his urge might stop ), you can keep him on your two legs stretched. This will enhance the urge, and you can also ask him to pass the motion.

    Later, to your surprise, he will call you, whenever he wants to use the Rest room.

    Even while travelling, whenever you find a Rest room, you can ask him to relieve his urge.

    This is such a good habit, and your child will never BED -WET in his/her future.




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    Jayanthy





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    how to teach baby to urinate

    hi all today i found this forum when searching for parenting guidelines. i am very much thankful for all your useful tips for moms.i have a question. my daughter is 2 1/2 year old now.pls tel me ideas to teach my baby to urinate. thank you

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    Re: how to teach baby to urinate

    hai kavi..!!
    welcome to penmai..!!

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    Re: how to teach baby to urinate

    thanks for welcoming me.

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    Re: how to teach baby to urinate

    Dear Kavitha!

    Warm welcome
    to 'Penmai'. Pl. go through below Penmai threads for your query...

    what should i teach my 1 year old

    Bedwetting???




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    Re: how to teach baby to urinate

    Hi Kavitha , I am guessing it is toilet training .......

    Best way is to avoid nappies........... Start using panties.....Of course there will be few accidents .....
    you can either get a baby toilet seat and train directly
    or
    Use a potty ....

    There are a variety of children's character potty and seats available .....

    Talk to her about potty training ...... Explain that she is a lil princess now and that she has to do potty like this only here after........

    you can play spl potty videos or read potty books ........

    initially you have to remind her to use her potty .....positive praise for every attempt and reassurance if accidents happen.....

    Lil one will gradually understand the urge to go potty and will start informing you when she wants to go ......

    though there are trainer nappies to use while potty training it only hampers the process ....bcos children will get confused .....so it is better to avoid it ..........

    first try to do day time training ......night time training will happen gradually .......

    also there will be setbacks from time to time ......

    Toddlers advice groups say that if there are other major events like moving houses , arrival of new baby etc will impact on the training and children may not use potty as effectively .....
    summer and having no other distractions is the best time to attempt it ......

    most of all being a girl baby slowly feminine hygiene has to be taught in due course ........
    Read Potty Training: Signs of Readiness







    Read Toilet Training Challenges and Solutions






    Moderator Note:

    This Article has been published in
    Penmai eMagazine Sep 2013. You Can download & Read the magazines HERE.

    Last edited by gkarti; 22nd Jul 2014 at 07:00 PM.
    sumitra likes this.
    Priya


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