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The Zen way Of Traveling

Discussions on "The Zen way Of Traveling" in "Psychological Problems" forum.

  1. #1
    vijigermany's Avatar
    vijigermany is offline Supreme Ruler's of Penmai
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    The Zen way Of Traveling

    The Zen way Of Traveling

    On the road of life, philosophers like to say, the journey is more important than the destination. But on the trek of our daily commute, we really do need to get somewhere--fast we can make the process less stressful Try these simple suggestions for transforming your drive time into a refreshing respite.

    Pay attention.
    On your drive, enjoy your time alone, tap into silence and internal stillness, listen to soothing music, or simply focus on the present moment--the scenery, the touch of your hands on the steering wheel.

    Zen master and poet Thich Nhat Hanh recommends using visual cues such as a red stoplight as a reminder to come back to the moment "where we can meet with life, joy, and peace."

    Mind your temper.
    When confronted with an aggressive driver or a narrowly missed fender bender, stay cool with a simple breathing exercise. Keeping Your Cool in the Chaos, breathing through your nose in long, measured inhalations and exhalations to slow your heart rate and stabilize stress-hormone levels.
    And instead of stewing about rush-hour traffic, put your situation into perspective. "The reality is that you're in a comfortable seat, you have access to music, and you can control your temperature," "You might as well be in your living room."

    Soothe your senses.
    Add a few drops of a calming essential oil like lavender to your car aromatherapy To bring the natural world into your ride, affix a decorative stone or a pinecone on the dashboard.

    Feed your mind.
    Use your commute time to enrich your brainpower rather than deplete it. Rent an audiobook from your local library to revisit a classic or give a listen to a best seller, or invest in an audio series to master a new language.

    Protect your body.
    Don't expect your car windows to block out skin- and eye-damaging UV rays. Before every commute, apply lip balm and sunblock with an SPF of 15 or higher. And always wear quality sunglasses to protect your eyes from the sun.

    Have time to spare.
    Leave home early enough to reach your workplace, find parking, and still have an extra five minutes to relax and get centered before you hit the desk.

    Gab on the go. A hands-free cell phone kit won't necessarily keep you on the right side of the road,
    but it might protect your health in other ways, In a recent study of 750 adults, Ahlbom discovered that those using cell phones for at least ten years were twice as likely to have acoustic neuroma. A rare, benign tumor that forms on the auditory nerve, acoustic neuroma was four times more common
    on the side of the head where study participants held their phones.

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  2. #2
    girija chandru's Avatar
    girija chandru is offline Penman of Penmai
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    Re: The Zen way Of Traveling

    Let me send you some zen stories what i liked.....
    I got it from the net....
    Best Zen stories

    Many teachings from Zen-Buddhism are told in short and delightful stories. They are usually designed to develop the mind and to free it from distortions and so to connect with our spirit.

    some of them are really inspiring and enlightening. It is helpful to the mind to think about them and feel the deeper meaning.

    They are about the following topics: life in the present moment, different perspectives, attachment, resistance, judgment, delusion, beliefs and thought as mental concepts but not truth and unconditional love. Please feel free to post your interpretation or other stories into the comments.

    A Cup of Tea

    Nan-in, a Japanese master during the Meiji era (1868-1912), received a university professor who came to inquire about Zen.
    Nan-in served tea. He poured his visitor’s cup full, and then kept on pouring.
    The professor watched the overflow until he no longer could restrain himself. "It is overfull. No more will go in!"
    "Like this cup," Nan-in said, "you are full of your own opinions and speculations. How can I show you Zen unless you first empty your cup?"

    2. The Burden

    Two monks were returning to the monastery in the evening. It had rained and there were puddles of water on the road sides. At one place a beautiful young woman was standing unable to walk accross because of a puddle of water. The elder of the two monks went up to a her lifted her and left her on the other side of the road, and continued his way to the monastery.
    In the evening the younger monk came to the elder monk and said, "Sir, as monks, we cannot touch a woman ?"
    The elder monk answered "yes, brother".
    Then the younger monk asks again, "but then Sir, how is that you lifted that woman on the roadside ?"
    The elder monk smiled at him and told him " I left her on the other side of the road, but you are still carrying her."
    3. Finding a Piece of the Truth

    One day Mara, the Evil One, was travelling through the villages of India with his attendants. he saw a man doing walking meditation whose face was lit up on wonder. The man had just discovered something on the ground in front of him. Mara’s attendant asked what that was and Mara replied, "A piece of truth."
    "Doesn’t this bother you when someone finds a piece of truth, O Evil One?" his attendant asked. "No," Mara replied. "Right after this, they usually make a belief out of it."

    4. The Other Side

    One day a young Buddhist on his journey home came to the banks of a wide river. Staring hopelessly at the great obstacle in front of him, he pondered for hours on just how to cross such a wide barrier. Just as he was about to give up his pursuit to continue his journey he saw a great teacher on the other side of the river. The young Buddhist yells over to the teacher, "Oh wise one, can you tell me how to get to the other side of this river"?
    The teacher ponders for a moment looks up and down the river and yells back, "My son, you are on the other side".

    5. Is That So?

    The Zen master Hakuin was praised by his neighbors as one living a pure life.
    A beautiful Japanese girl whose parents owned a food store lived near him. Suddenly, without any warning, her parents discovered she was with child.
    This made her parents very angry. She would not confess who the man was, but after much harassment at last named Hakuin.
    In great anger the parents went to the master. "Is that so?" was all he would say.
    When the child was born, the parents brought it to the Hakuin, who now was viewed as a pariah by the whole village. They demanded that he take care of the child since it was his responsibility. “Is that so?” Hakuin said calmly as he accepted the child.
    A year later the girl-mother could stand it no longer. She told her parents the truth – that the real father of the child was a young man who worked in the fishmarket.
    The mother and father of the girl at once went to Hakuin to ask his forgiveness, to apologize at length, and to get the child back again.
    Hakuin was willing. In yielding the child, all he said was: "Is that so?"
    6. Maybe

    Once upon the time there was an old farmer who had worked his crops for many years. One day his horse ran away. Upon hearing the news, his neighbors came to visit. “Such bad luck,” they said sympathetically.
    “Maybe,” the farmer replied.
    The next morning the horse returned, bringing with it three other wild horses. “How wonderful,” the neighbors exclaimed.
    “Maybe,” replied the old man.
    The following day, his son tried to ride one of the untamed horses, was thrown, and broke his leg. The neighbors again came to offer their sympathy on his misfortune.
    “Maybe,” answered the farmer.
    The day after, military officials came to the village to draft young men into the army. Seeing that the son’s leg was broken, they passed him by. The neighbors congratulated the farmer on how well things had turned out.
    “Maybe,” said the farmer.

    7. Cliffhanger

    One day while walking through the wilderness a man stumbled upon a vicious tiger. He ran but soon came to the edge of a high cliff. Desperate to save himself, he climbed down a vine and dangled over the fatal precipice.
    As he hung there, two mice appeared from a hole in the cliff and began gnawing on the vine.
    Suddenly, he noticed on the vine a plump wild strawberry. He plucked it and popped it in his mouth. It was incredibly delicious!
    8. The Blind Men and the Elephant

    Several citizens ran into a hot argument about God and different religions, and each one could not agree to a common answer. So they came to the Lord Buddha to find out what exactly God looks like.
    The Buddha asked his disciples to get a large magnificent elephant and four blind men. He then brought the four blind to the elephant and told them to find out what the elephant would "look" like.
    The first blind men touched the elephant leg and reported that it "looked" like a pillar. The second blind man touched the elephant tummy and said that an elephant was a wall. The third blind man touched the elephant ear and said that it was a piece of cloth. The fourth blind man hold on to the tail and described the elephant as a piece of rope. And all of them ran into a hot argument about the "appearance" of an elephant.
    The Buddha asked the citizens: "Each blind man had touched the elephant but each of them gives a different description of the animal. Which answer is right?"
    9. Right and Wrong

    When Bankei held his seclusion-weeks of meditation, pupils from many parts of Japan came to attend. During one of these gatherings a pupil was caught stealing. The matter was reported to Bankei with the request that the culprit be expelled. Bankei ignored the case.
    Late the pupil was caught in a similar act, and again Bankei disregarded the matter. This angered the other pupils, who drew up a petition asking for the dismissal of the thief, stating that otherwise they would leave in a body. When Bankei had read the petition he called everyone before him. "You are wise brothers," he told them. "You know what is right and what is not right. You may go somewhere else to study if you wish, but this poor brother does not even know right from wrong. Who will teach him if I do not? I am going to keep him here even if all the rest of you leave."
    A torrent of tears cleansed the face of the brother who had stolen. All desire to steal had vanished.
    10. Nothing Exists

    Yamaoka Tesshu, as a young student of Zen, visited one master after another. He called upon Dokuon of Shokoku.
    Desiring to show his attainment, he said: "The mind, Buddha, and sentient beings, after all, do not exist. The true nature of phenomena is emptiness. There is no realization, no delusion, no sage, no mediocrity. There is no giving and nothing to be received."
    Dokuon, who was smoking quietly, said nothing. Suddenly he whacked Yamaoka with his bamboo pipe. This made the youth quite angry.
    "If nothing exists," inquired Dokuon, "where did this anger come from?"
    Bonus 11. Teaching the Ultimate

    In early times in Japan, bamboo-and-paper lanterns were used with candles inside. A blind man, visiting a friend one night, was offered a lantern to carry home with him.
    "I do not need a lantern," he said. "Darkness or light is all the same to me."
    "I know you do not need a lantern to find your way," his friend replied, "but if you don’t have one, someone else may run into you. So you must take it."
    The blind man started off with the lantern and before he had walked very far someone ran squarely into him. "Look out where you are going!" he exclaimed to the stranger. "Can’t you see this lantern?"
    "Your candle has burned out, brother," replied the stranger.

    Mals likes this.
    "Our sweetest songs are those that tell of the saddest thoughts "

    My completed story :-
    நம்பிக்கை ஒளி

    My ongoing story :-
    ததும்பி வழிகிறதே மௌனம் - Thathumbi

    ததும்பி வழிகிறதே மௌனம் - Thathumbi Vazhikiradhae Mounam (Comments)

    Penmai.Com - Indian, Tamil Women's Forum - Online Community - மயிலிறகாய் ரா.கிரிஜா - Blogs

    1) THOGUPPU 1 :- "வேரும் (க)விதைகளும் " DATED 17.02.2016
    2) THOGUPPU 2 :- "கவிதையாய் இனிய சாரல்கள்" DATED 18.02.2016

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    Mals is offline Guru's of Penmai
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