Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links
Penmai eMagazine November! | All Issues

User Tag List

Like Tree10Likes
  • 2 Post By jayasheela
  • 2 Post By sumitra
  • 2 Post By sumitra
  • 3 Post By vijivedachalam
  • 1 Post By GayathriArun

Trying to Conceive


Discussions on "Trying to Conceive" in "Trying to Conceive" forum.


  1. #1
    jayasheela is offline Newbie
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    malaysia
    Posts
    1

    Trying to Conceive

    Dear Penmai Team

    My Name is Sheela from malaysia have got married for 2 year plus but try to conceive is not work .what supposed i do for that please explain to me .


    Thank You
    Sheela

    Similar Threads:

    Sponsored Links
    sumitra and GayathriArun like this.

  2. #2
    sumitra's Avatar
    sumitra is offline Registered User
    Blogger
    Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    mysore
    Posts
    23,699
    Blog Entries
    18

    Re: Trying to Conceive

    Dear Sheela, don't worry. be confident and cheerful. Please go through following article which may help you to solve your problem.

    You're ready to have a baby! Now what? Trying to conceive can be exciting and fun, but it can also be frustrating. Being in tune with your body can greatly increase your chances of becoming pregnant.


    Like any other system in your body, the reproductive system needs to be in good shape to work properly. So before you plunge into pregnancy, take some time to get into top form.

    Quitting Birth Control

    When you decide that it's time to add a baby to your family, it's obviously time to ditch the birth control. The type of contraception you have been using might determine how soon you will conceive:

    • After stopping the birth control medication you might begin to ovulate immediately, or you might not ovulate for several months. So don't panic if you don't get pregnant right away. Give your body time to adjust and produce its own monthly cycle.
    • If you are using an IUD for contraception, you will have to have it removed by your doctor. After it is taken out, your body is ready to conceive.
    • If you have been using some type of barrier method (condoms, diaphragm, or spermicide) you are eligible to get conceived as long as you don't use them. So there's no medical reason to wait a period of time before you begin. Toss them aside and you're ready to go.

    Eating Right

    There is no specific diet known to boost fertility. But because diet affects the health of the entire body and all its systems, it makes sense that good diet is needed to get your body in good physical shape to support conception and pregnancy. This is a good time to increase your intake of wholesome, nutritious foods from fruits, grains and vegetables.You might also want to go for organic foods to reduce the potential for taking in potential dangers from fertilisers and insecticides through the food chain.
    This is also the time to work toward maintaining ideal body weight. Being overweight or underweight can complicate a pregnancy. Overweight women are at greater risk of developing diabetes, high bp during pregnancy. Underweight women tend to have low-birthweight babies. But unfortunately, after you find out that you're pregnant, it's too late to begin a weight-loss or weight-gain diet. Your baby needs a balanced diet of nutritious foods—not too little or too much. So talk to your doctor about how to best reach your ideal weight before you become pregnant.

    Staying Fit

    Exercise is good for improving fertility, but it can also be bad-it's a matter of degree. The exercise keeps body healthy (very important for conception). It promotes good circulation to all body parts, including the reproductive system. It reduces the stress of daily life that can hold up conception. It also promotes better sleep, allowing your body the time it needs to repair and rejuvenate. And it helps knock off extra calories for slow and steady weight loss. All of these benefits support optimum health.

    However, too much exercise can decrease the state of fertility. It can disrupt the normal flow of hormones and interfere with ovulation and menstrual cycles, and therefore have a direct impact on fertility. That's why some women who run more than 20 miles a week have infrequent or absent menstrual cycles. If your exercise routine interferes with a normal monthly menstrual cycle, you'll have to reduce your workout to get your body regulated before you can conceive. Talk to your doctor about how to best restore a healthy hormonal balance.

    Exercise can also affect fertility of male. Sperm production can be reduced if the temperature in the testes rises. So while you are trying to conceive, your partner might want to avoid bicycle riding, jogging, or any other exercise in which the testicles are tightly confined, rubbed, or heated.

    Avoiding Environmental Toxins

    As a general rule it's best to avoid chemical products and toxins while trying to conceive a baby—that goes for both you and your partner. Many toxins affect both male and female fertility. Toxins which affect a growing fetus are also known to interfere with healthy conception. You'll want to stay away from pesticides, cleaning products etc some interior decorating activities, air pollution, radiation, and even some arts and craft supplies.


    What Happens During Conception

    The release of an egg

    Each woman is born with her full quota of follicles that contain immature eggs, some of which will mature and be released in her lifetime. Every month, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), released from the pituitary gland, encourages a number of the follicles to ripen. These follicles in turn produce the hormone estrogen, rising levels of which encourage the uterus to thicken to prepare for the implantation of a fertilized egg. As the eggs mature, the level of estrogen rises and the pituitary gland receives a message to produce luteinizing hormone (LH). Every month, this surge in LH triggers one follicle (and sometimes more than one) to release a mature egg-the moment of ovulation.

    Once the egg leaves the ovary, it enters the fallopian tube, which lies close by, and starts to travel through the tube to the uterus. The fallopian tube is just 4 in (10 cm) long and its lining has many tiny fronds that literally brush the egg in the direction of the uterus. Even so, the journey takes five days or more. In the course of this voyage, the fertilization of the egg takes place.

    The journey of the sperm

    During sex, the man releases an abundance of sperm-around 250 million at each ejaculation-into the vagina. Each sperm has a long tail to propel it, so it's well equipped to swim up to the fallopian tube, where fertilization of the egg takes place. The whole distance, from the vagina through the uterus and up into the fallopian tube can be accomplished in hours. However, the sperm can survive in the vagina and the uterus for 3-5 days, meaning there is a window of around 6 days in which fertilization can take place (an egg lives 12-24 hours after ovulation). Not all of the millions of sperm make it as far as the fallopian tube; in fact, most of them die, seep out of the vagina, or get lost along the way. Around just 200 sperm, only a tiny fraction of the number originally released, arrive at the site of the egg.

    The moment of fertilization

    Although many sperm cluster around the egg and try to penetrate its outer layer, only one of them will manage to burrow its way through the surface and fertilize the egg. Once this happens, the egg's outer layer thickens quickly to keep out other competing sperm, so that each egg can be fertilized by only one sperm.

    Implantation in the uterus

    By the time the fertilized egg reaches the uterus, it has grown from a single cell into a compact cluster of cells, called a blastocyst. This cluster attaches to the uterine lining very loosely at first, then more deeply and permanently. At this early stage, the blob of cells, which is more than just a fertilized egg, but not quite an embryo, is sometimes referred to as a "conceptus." Although its sex is already determined, it's not remotely baby-shaped yet. The cells produce enzymes that allow it to digest its way into the uterus lining, and lie snugly below the surface.

    swaga2008 and GayathriArun like this.

  3. #3
    sumitra's Avatar
    sumitra is offline Registered User
    Blogger
    Ruler's of Penmai
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    mysore
    Posts
    23,699
    Blog Entries
    18

    Re: Trying to Conceive

    The Facts About Infertility

    Male and female fertility issues

    Although the process of sperm-meets-egg is natural and easy for most couples, some couples who want to conceive a child struggle with the issue of infertility. Approximately 6.1 million American women and their partners (which is about 10 percent of the people in the reproductive age bracket) are affected by infertility.
    The reasons for this heartache are many and uncertain. Some feel that the age of free sex in the 1960s passed around the sexually transmitted diseases, that now years later cause both male and female reproductive problems. Others point to the toxins from environment caused by the breakdown of pesticides and plastics that are linked to reduced sperm count. Abortions have caused many scarred fallopian tubes, which blocks the sperm from meeting up with the egg. And the increasing numbers of women who postpone having child until their 30s or 40s, when their eggs are no longer top quality, naturally reduces the fertility pool.

    Medical Reasons for Infertility in Females

    In many cases the cause of infertility in females is rooted in a treatable medical condition. The top two reasons for female infertility are (1) tubal factors (such as damaged fallopian tubes) and (2) ovulatory disorders (such as an irregular or absent menstrual cycle). A smaller percentage of women suffer from endometriosis (a condition in which tissue from inside the uterus grows outside the uterus), which can cause infertility if left untreated.
    Some women who do get pregnant but then repeated miscarry the baby might also have a medical problem that can be corrected. Similar to other types of infertility, repeat miscarriages might be caused by hormonal problems, ovulatory problems, or structural problems in which the uterus won't support a pregnancy. In a few rare cases, an abnormality of the chromosomes might be the cause. But unfortunately, in the majority of cases, the reason for repeat miscarriages is unknown.

    Reasons for Infertility in Males

    Infertility in males is due to problems with their sperm. The number of sperm might be low (viability), the sperm might be abnormally shaped (morphology), or the sperm might move too slowly or sluggishly (motility).
    Although the causes of these problems are many and varied, the most common reasons are as follows:

    • Varicocele, or varicose veins of the testicles, cause a dilation of the veins and an increased volume of blood in the testicles. Blood retained around the testes leads to an increase in temperature, which can damage sperm, causing low sperm counts and misshaped sperm. It might also interfere with testosterone levels.
    • Infections in the reproductive organs can cause reduced sperm production. Sometimes it's only a temporary reduction and can be treated with antibiotics before any physical damage occurs; other times the damage is permanent. Some infections are caused by various venereal diseases, especially gonorrhea, which can scar the delicate tubes through which sperm are transported. Tuberculosis or mumps might also invade the reproductive organs and cause physical damage. Viral diseases such as mononucleosis and hepatitis and any other illness that causes a persistent high fever can temporarily but dramatically depress sperm production.
    • Anatomical problems can make it difficult or impossible for sperm to do their job. These include irregularities in the male reproductive system that either prevent the testicles from producing sperm or block the sperm from being ejaculated.
    • Hormonal factors can cause an imbalance of "sex" hormones that can result in a number of infertility problems in a male.
    • Other factors include the side effects of testicular cancer treatment, a hypothalamic or pituitary disorder, problems with the cells that produce sperm, the inability to effectively reverse a vasectomy, and age (yes, the count and quality of a man's sperm can decline as he gets older).


    Conceiving a Baby: Timing Is Everything

    There is a fairly narrow window of time each month during which the sperm can fertilize the egg. After the egg is released by the ovary and begins its journey down the fallopian tube toward the uterus, it will live for only about 24 hours. If it isn't fertilized by a sperm in that time, the opportunity for pregnancy is lost until the next month, when the process begins again. That's why knowing when your egg is released each month is so important if you want to become pregnant.
    Of course, some women get pregnant the very first time they try without ever even thinking about their "fertile days." But others have a tougher time getting the egg and the sperm to make a match. If you don't conceive exactly when you want to, don't get discouraged. It often takes several months to a year for a perfectly fertile couple to conceive a child. But to help the process along, here are a few tips to boost the odds of conceiving sooner rather than later.

    Because the egg will live for only 24 hours, you might think that you have to have intercourse on that exact day to conceive a child, but Nature gives you a little break here. Sperm can live in the reproductive tract of the woman for about 72 hours. This means that if you have sex on day 11 of your cycle and ovulate on day 14, that sperm still has a chance to fertilize that egg.
    You can track your menstrual period each month to figure out when your body is ovulating—the time period when the ovary releases the egg for fertilization. Tracking your period is the best way to zero in on your most fertile days. You'll need a thermometer and a calendar or a chart like the one that follows, or you can buy a basal body temperature (BBT) thermometer at any pharmacy, which might come with a BBT calendar chart. Either way, put the thermometer and calendar right next to your bed where you can reach them. Starting on the first day of your monthly period, take your temperature daily before getting out of bed in the morning, and record the result on the calendar. Also record the days of menstruation and the days you have sex with your partner. Do this every day throughout the month. About 14 days after the first day of your period, you should begin ovulating (not all women are "regular," and ovulation can occur before or after this date). Shortly after this happens, the body-at-rest temperature rises one-half to one full degree and remains elevated until the end of that cycle.
    During the first month of tracking you won't be able to identify your most fertile days because the rise in temperature occurs after ovulation—when conception is very unlikely or even impossible. But after you've charted the information you can look back on the month and pinpoint the day your temperature spiked. Intercourse for the purpose of conception should take place one or two days before the rise in temperature. (You might notice during this fertile time a slight drop in body temperature.)

    f you don't notice any sustained temperature rise during your monthly cycle, you might not be ovulating (even though you get your period). This is something your doctor should know about; there are medications that can increase the likelihood of successful ovulation. The BBT is not foolproof. It is influenced by many factors, including medication, alcohol, degree of physical activity, and illness. Try to keep track of these things on your BBT chart as well; after about three months, you should be able to identify general patterns.


    To maximize your chances of conception, you should have intercourse before your anticipated rise in body temperature. After ovulation occurs and your temperature has risen, it is too late for a sperm to fertilize the egg. That's because after ovulation the mucus thickens to block the sperm, and the entrance to the cervix grows firmer, preventing sperm from entering.
    Time intercourse for every other day for two to four days in this fertile period. Intercourse every other day is recommended rather than daily intercourse because ejaculating too often can lower the sperm count. One ejaculation from a fertile man releases more than 20 million sperm—this is plenty to do the job until the next group arrives 48 hours later.
    After intercourse, relax and lie still. It takes sperm about 20 minutes to work their way through the cervical mucus and up to the fallopian tubes. Lying down during this time will reduce the risk of sperm leakage from the vagina.

    swaga2008 and GayathriArun like this.

  4. #4
    vijivedachalam's Avatar
    vijivedachalam is offline Penman of Penmai
    Blogger
    Ruler's of Penmai
    Real Name
    vijayalakshmiBala
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    villupuram
    Posts
    10,965
    Blog Entries
    68

    Re: Trying to Conceive

    hi sheela.... god bless u ......

    simple home remeady : pls just try it sheela....

    collect malai vembu(neem) and poondu(garlic)
    grind malai vembu and poondu and mix i well with milk........................

    drink this on fifh day of ur mensural cycle.....

    all the best.....

    life is so beautiful....

  5. #5
    GayathriArun's Avatar
    GayathriArun is offline Friends's of Penmai
    Real Name
    Gayathri ArunPrakash
    Gender
    Female
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Dubai, UAE
    Posts
    459

    Re: Trying to Conceive

    Quote Originally Posted by jayasheela View Post
    Dear Penmai Team

    My Name is Sheela from malaysia have got married for 2 year plus but try to conceive is not work .what supposed i do for that please explain to me .


    Thank You
    Sheela
    Since you said, though you are trying - it doesn't work, first consult the doctor and then decide upon it. All the best and baby dust!

    sumitra likes this.
    Gayathri ArunPrakash

loading...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Like It?
Share It!







Follow Penmai on Twitter