Keep gas under control

Some people experience an increase in gas when stepping up their intake of fibre while on a diet. While not a symptom of any serious condition, gas can be uncomfortable and unpleasant.

Fortunately, this side effect can be managed with the simple modifications listed below.

Reduce sugar-alcohol intake .
One of the unfortunate side effects of sugar-alcohol consumption is excessive gas production. Since sugar alcohols are found in a variety of sugar-free foods, they may be a cause of your troubles. The 75-100-calorie limit on sweet treats (which includes foods containing sugar alcohol) will help you avoid this unpleasant side effect.

Start slowly
. Most diets encourage the consumption of fibre-rich foods. You may need to approach this slowly, though, starting with a half cup per day of gas-producing foods like cruciferous vegetables (broccoli and cabbage, for instance) and beans. Gradually increase the amounts of these foods as your body adjusts to them (usually in a matter of days or weeks).

Cut back on fibre supplements .
Taking a daily fibre supplement may also increase gas production. Try easing up on your daily use of these supplements and see if your gas problem clears up. If it does, you may want to cut back on your dosage of these supplements and concentrate more on getting fibre from natural food sources. Be advised that if you are taking fibre supplements, you should drink plenty of water throughout the day to aid in their digestion. (Also, if you are using a supplement because your doctor has suggested you do so, do not discontinue it without first talking with your doctor ) .

Pay a visit to your doctor .
If you follow this advice but continue to experience uncomfortable gas, it may be time to see a doctor. Excessive gas production can also be attributed to lactose intolerance, irritable bowel syndrome, or antibiotic use. Your doctor can help pinpoint the problem and determine a suitable course of action.

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