மெய்ப்பொருள் - A Parenting Checklist

rameshshan

Commander's of Penmai
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#1
Meipporul I am sure all of us aware of this word and the power it mean. When we need to share anything about parenting, there cannot be a phenomenon of assumption, it should be the truth and that too when it comes to a child it was even more sacred.

Being a person from science background and above all a ‘going to be’ father is that what triggered me to start this thread. Parenting starts right from the day the baby formed in the womb of a mother isnt!

‘Parenting Checklist’ is what the content is all about. Let us start with some interesting facts about kids;

Fathers tend to determine the height of their child, mothers their weight’

‘On average, a 4-year-old child asks 437 questions a day’

‘A 3-year old Boy's voice is louder than 200 adults in a crowded restaurant’


‘Children under the age of six are at the greatest risk for crushing or burning injuries of the hand’

Many more science, facts, tips, do’s & don’ts, essentials and all about parenting & child development will be posted here. I will try to update here more often!

To start this thread an interesting one, I would like to post the early stages of a kid & how can a parent/ care giver can act;


By the age of 1 MONTH
A baby should be able to:
turn her or his head towards a hand that is stroking the child’s cheek or mouth
bring both hands towards her or his mouth
● turn towards familiar voices and sounds

● suckle the breast and touch it with her or his hands.


Advice for parents and other caregivers:
make skin-to-skin contact and breastfeed within one hour of birth
support the baby’s head when you hold the baby upright
massage and cuddle the baby often
always handle the baby gently, even when you are tired or upset
breastfeed frequently and on demand
always safely dispose of the baby’s faeces and wash hands with soap and water or a substitute, such as ash and water, after changing the baby
talk, read and sing to the child as much as possible
give consistent love and affection
visit a trained health worker with the infant during the first week and again six weeks after birth.

Warning signs to watch for:
poor suckling at the breast or refusing to suckle
little movement of arms and legs
little or no reaction to loud sounds or bright lights
crying for long periods for no apparent reason
vomiting and diarrhoea, which can lead to dehydration.
 
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rameshshan

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#2
By the age of 6 MONTHS

A baby should be able to:
raise the head and chest when lying on her or his stomach
reach for dangling objects
grasp and shake objects
roll both ways
sit with support
explore objects with hands and mouth
begin to imitate sounds and facial expressions
respond to her or his own name and to familiar faces.

Advice for parents and other caregivers:

lay the baby on a clean, flat, safe surface so she or he can move freely and reach for objects
continue to hold and cuddle the baby every day, giving consistent love and affection
prop or hold the baby in a secure position so she or he can see what is happening nearby
continue to breastfeed on demand day and night, and start adding other foods (two to three meals a day starting at 6 months; three to four meals a day from 9 months)
talk, read or sing to the child as often as possible, not only when she or he is hungry or getting ready to sleep.

Warning signs to watch for:

stiffness or difficulty moving limbs
constant moving of the head (this might indicate an ear infection, which could lead to deafness if not treated)
little or no response to sounds, familiar faces or the breast
refusing the breast or other foods.
 

rameshshan

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#3
By the age of 12 MONTHS

A baby should be able to:

sit without support
crawl on hands and knees and pull herself or himself up to stand
take steps holding on to support
try to imitate words and sounds and respond to simple requests
enjoy playing and clapping
repeat sounds and gestures for attention
pick things up with thumb and one finger
start holding objects such as a spoon and cup and attempt self-feeding.

Advice for parents and other caregivers:

point to objects and name them; play with, talk, sing and read to the child frequently
use mealtimes and other family activities to encourage interaction with all family members
give consistent affection and be responsive both when the child is happy and when upset
if the child is developing slowly or has a physical disability, focus on the child’s abilities and give extra stimulation and interaction
do not leave a child in one position for many hours
make the area as safe as possible to prevent accidents, and keep dangerous objects, such as sharp objects, plastic bags and small items a child can choke on, out of the child’s reach
continue to breastfeed and ensure that the child has enough food and a variety of family foods
help the child experiment with spoon and cup feeding
make sure the child’s immunizations are up to date and that she or he receives all recommended doses of nutrient supplements
keep the child’s hands clean and begin teaching the child to wash them with soap.

Warning signs to watch for:

does not make sounds in response to others
does not look at objects that move
listlessness and lack of response to the caregiver
lack of appetite or refusal of food.
 

rameshshan

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#4
By the age of 2 YEARS

A child should be able to:

walk, climb and run
point to objects or pictures when they are named (e.g., nose, eyes, ears)
say several words together (from about 15 months)
follow simple instructions
scribble if given a pencil or crayon
enjoy simple stories and songs
imitate the behaviour of others
begin to eat by herself or himself.

Advice for parents and other caregivers:

read to and sing or play games with the child
teach the child to avoid dangerous objects
talk to the child normally – do not use baby talk
continue to breastfeed and ensure the child has enough food and a variety of family foods
make sure the child is fully immunized
encourage, but do not force, the child to eat
provide simple rules and set reasonable expectations
praise the child’s achievements, provide reassurance when the child is afraid and continue to give consistent affection every day.

Warning signs to watch for:

lack of response to others
difficulty keeping balance while walking
injuries and unexplained changes in behaviour (especially if the child has been cared for by others)
lack of appetite.

Moderator Note:

This Article has been published in
Penmai eMagazine Jan 2013. You Can download & Read the magazines HERE.

 
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rameshshan

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#5
By the age of 3 YEARS

A child should be able to:

walk, run, climb, kick and jump easily
recognize and identify common objects and pictures by pointing
make sentences of two or three words
say her or his own name and age
name colours
understand numbers
use make-believe objects in play
feed herself or himself
express affection.

Advice for parents and other caregivers:

read and look at books with the child and talk about the pictures
tell the child stories and teach rhymes and songs
give the child her or his own bowl or plate of food
continue to encourage the child to eat, giving the child as much time as she or he needs
help the child learn to dress, use the toilet or latrine and wash her or his hands with soap and water or a substitute, such as ash and water, after defecating and before touching food and eating
listen to and answer all the child’s questions
encourage creative play, building and drawing
give the child simple tasks, such as putting toys back in their place, to build responsibility
limit television watching and ensure that violent shows are not viewed
acknowledge and encourage positive behaviour and set clear limits
provide consistent affection every day
if available, enrol the child in an early learning (play) activity with other children.

Warning signs to watch for:

loss of interest in playing
frequent falling
difficulty manipulating small objects
failure to understand simple messages
inability to speak using several words
little or no interest in food.

Moderator Note:

This Article has been published in Penmai eMagazine Feb 2013. You Can download & Read the magazines
HERE.


 
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rameshshan

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#6
By the age of 5 YEARS

A child should be able to:

move in a coordinated way
speak in sentences and use many different words
understand opposites (e.g., fat and thin, tall and short)
play with other children
dress without help
answer simple questions
count 5–10 objects
wash her or his own hands.

Advice for parents and other caregivers:

listen to the child
interact frequently with the child
read and tell stories
encourage the child (both girls and boys) to play and explore
listen to and answer all the child’s questions, have conversations (with both girls and boys)
encourage creative play, building and drawing
limit television watching and ensure that violent shows are not viewed
acknowledge and encourage positive behaviour and set clear and consistent limits
provide consistent affection every day
enrol the child (both girls and boys) in an early learning (play) programme that helps to prepare the child for school.

Warning signs to watch for:

fear, anger or violence when playing with other children, which could be signs of emotional problems or abuse.

Moderator Note:

This Article has been published in Penmai eMagazine Mar 2013. You Can download & Read the magazines
HERE.
 
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rameshshan

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#7
By the age of 8 YEARS

A child’s:

physical development proceeds more gradually and steadily than in the early years
muscle mass increases, and small and large motor skills improve
ability to understand and communicate abstract concepts and complex ideas has begun to develop
span of attention increases, and she or he can focus on the past and future as well as the present
learning capacity is expanding, and she or he is learning to read, write and do problem solving in a school environment
friends and interactions with her or his peer group are increasingly important
interest in friendships includes enjoying time with her or his peer group and turning to peers for information
self-control improves, and understanding of more complex emotions
increases.

Advice for parents and other caregivers:

be a good role model, equally for girls and boys
encourage your child to express feelings and beliefs and to solve problems
recognize and support your child’s strengths and skills as well as limitations
spend time with your child, and talk and listen to her or him
find activities you can do together that will make your child feel successful, secure and loved
facilitate and support your child’s playtime with friends and in extra-curricular school activities
acknowledge and encourage positive behaviour and set clear and consistent limits
show interest and become involved in your child’s school – remember that the mother, father and/or other caregiver(s) are a child’s first and most important teachers.

Warning signs to watch for:

difficulties making and keeping friends and participating in group activities
avoiding a task or challenge without trying, or showing signs of helplessness
trouble communicating needs, thoughts and emotions
trouble focusing on tasks, understanding and completing schoolwork
excessive aggression or shyness with friends and family.

Moderator Note:

This Article has been published in Penmai eMagazine Apr 2013. You Can download & Read the magazines
HERE.

 
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umaravi2011

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#8
Hi Ramesh

you have covered the entire activity of the child from the day one to 8 years

very nice and valuable information


thanks for sharing
 

rameshshan

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#9
Breast Milk is best. Nothing that money can buy is as good for a baby as breastfeeding.

  • Initiation of Breastfeeding within the first hour of life,
  • Exclusive Breastfeeding for six months,
  • Timely Complementary Feeding with appropriate foods, and
  • Continued Breastfeeding for Two Years and beyond.

Let us see some FAQs on Breast feeding:

1. When Should My Baby Get Her First Breastfeed?

As soon as the baby is born, the doctor will hand her to you. Hold the naked baby against your chest for direct skin-to-skin contact. Depending upon the temperature in the delivery room, both of you will be covered lightly with a sheet, with or without a blanket. Most babies, especially those whose mothers have not been doped, are alert for about 40 minutes to an hour after delivery. Take advantage of this period. Try to see if she might be interested in breastfeeding right away. You will find that some babies turn their heads to one side and start looking for the nipple. Some succeed in getting hold of the nipple and start suckling. You will be thrilled to see this happening. If she does not attempt this on her own, you can gently bring her mouth nearer one breast and see if she wants to suckle. Do not force her if she is not interested.

This early contact with your baby is important for bonding with her and for giving her the valuable colostrum.

It has been observed that the suckling reflex of a newborn is at its height 20 to 30 minutes after birth. If the infant is not fed at this time, the reflex diminishes rapidly to reappear adequately 40 hours later. It may be further delayed if the mother is ‘overdoped’. On the other hand, if the baby is put to the breast within half an hour after birth, she takes the breast properly and early weight loss, which is so common in newborn babies, is minimised.

Nursing soon after delivery also has a laxative effect on the meconium. The early evacuation of meconium tends to decrease the reabsorption of bilirubin (the yellow pigment responsible for jaundice). This pigment is liberated by the breakdown of cast-off red blood cells present in the intestines. Decreased reabsorption of bilirubin reduces the appearance of jaundice. Even if the jaundice does appear, effective evacuation of meconium reduces its severity.

Moderator Note:

This Article has been published in Penmai eMagazine May 2013. You Can download & Read the magazines
HERE.

 
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rameshshan

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#10
2. What About Breastfeeding?

After a normal delivery, you and your baby will be taken to your room. If you are not heavily sedated, keep your baby next to you in your bed. You may like to cuddle her if she is still awake. In private hospitals, a baby cot is provided next to your bed. You can decide if you want to keep the baby all the time in your bed or partly in the cot and in the bed according to convenience.

If you delivered by a Caesarean section under general anaesthesia, you may be on a drip. Even then, the baby shoul be given to you for breastfeeding after about 4 hours of the operation, when you recover from the effects of anaesthesia. You will need the assistance of a hospital attendant or a close relative to give your child th first breastfeed. As you lie on your back, the nurse may place the baby on a pillow raised to the level of your breast, so that she can conveniently reach it.

Here it must be mentioned that if your first child was delivered by a Caesarean section, it is not mandatory that the subsequent delivery has to be Caesarean. You may raise this issue with your doctor. But leave the final decision about whether an operation is needed again or not to him.

Also a word about episiotomy. This is a cut made on your skin just outside the birth canal for easy delivery of the baby. It is possible that you needed it and you should accept it if it was inevitable. However, you could mention to your doctor that as far as possible, you would like to avoid episiotomy. Episiotomy may be needed with a first delivery and can often be avoided in subsequent deliveries.

I touched on this subject because following a Caesarean or an episiotomy, your doctor may give you sedatives or pain-killers which can adversely affect your close interaction with your baby and proper initiation of breastfeeding.

In case your doctor decides to do the episiotomy, he may prescribe drugs to relieve the pain of the stitches. Doctors have found that if the baby is given to the mother soon after delivery for skin-to-skin contact, the mother gets so engrossed in her baby that stitching is often done without taking recourse to drugs for suppressing pain.

A word about the duration of the first breastfeed. The first feed could be given in the labour room or after you come to your room. This feed might last from 10 to 45 minutes and may be from one or both breasts.

Moderator Note:

This Article has been published in
Penmai eMagazine Jun 2013. You Can download & Read the magazines HERE.
 
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