Diaper Dermatitis

Nishahameetha

Ruler's of Penmai
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Jul 5, 2011
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Trichy
#1
Diaper rash usually causes mild redness and scaling where the diaper touches your baby's skin. In certain cases, the rash can cause pimples, blisters and other sores on your baby’s buttocks, thighs or genital area. If the rash gets infected, it may become bright red and the skin may get swollen. Small red patches or spots may spread beyond the main part of the rash, even outside the diaper area.

CAUSES


  • Diaper rashes are common in babies between 4 and 15 months old. They may be noticed more when babies begin to eat solid foods.
  • Infection-Diaper rashes caused by infection with a yeast or fungus called Candida are very common in children. Candida is found everywhere in the environment. It grows best in warm, moist places, such as under a diaper. A yeast-related diaper rash is more likely to occur in babies who:
Are not kept clean and dry.
Have more frequent stools.

  • Skin irritation- Most diaper rashes are caused by skin irritation. Irritation can be caused by diapers that rub against the skin or fit too tightly. Irritation can also occur if your baby is left in a wet or dirty diaper for a long period of time. Your baby's skin can also be irritated by the soap used to wash cloth diapers, or by some brands of disposable diapers or baby wipes.
  • Plasticpants -Plastic pants that fit over diapers raise the temperature and moisture in the diaper area. Heat and moisture make it easier for diaper rash to start and for germs to grow.
  • Antibiotics-Diaper rash can also develop while the baby is on antibiotics (or if the mother is on antibiotics while breastfeeding).
SYMPTOMS

  • Bright red rash that gets bigger
  • Red or scaly areas on the labia and vagina in girls
  • Fiery red and scaly areas on the scrotum and penis in boys
  • Pimples, blisters, ulcers, large bumps, or pus-filled sores
  • Smaller red patches (called satellite lesions) that grow and blend in with the other patches.
SIGNS AND TESTS
Yeast or Candida-related diaper rashes often can be diagnosed by the appearance alone. The KOH test can confirm a Candida diagnosis.

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT


  • Always wash your hands after changing a diaper.
  • Keep your baby's diaper area clean, cool and dry. This will also help prevent new diaper rashes.
  • Change your baby's diaper often and change it soon as it’s wet, and let him or her go without a diaper when possible to let the air dry his or her skin.
  • Clean your baby’s bottom between diaper changes using warm water and a soft cloth or cotton ball to gently clean the diaper area with every diaper change. Avoid rubbing or scrubbing the area. A squirt bottle of water may be used for sensitive areas
  • Pat the area dry or allow to air-dry
  • Put diapers on loosely. Diapers that are too tight don't allow enough air and may rub and irritate the baby's waist or thighs
  • Lay your baby on a towel without a diaper on whenever possible. The more time the baby can be kept out of a diaper, the better.
  • Ask your doctor if a diaper rash cream would be helpful. Zinc oxide or petroleum jelly-based products help keep moisture away from baby's skin when applied to completely clean, dry skin.Do not use creams that contain boric acid, camphor, phenol, methyl salicylate or compound of benzoin tincture. These things can be harmful.
  • Using highly absorbent diapers helps keep the skin dry and reduces the chance of getting an infection.
  • Avoid using wipes and soap that have alcohol or perfume. They may dry out or irritate the skin more.
  • Avoid using plastic pants or diapers with plastic edges.
  • If the rash persists change the type of diaper, wipes or soap you are using.
TREATMENT

  • Do not use talcum powder or cornstarch. Talcum powder can get in your baby's lungs. Cornstarch may make a diaper rash caused by a yeast infection worse.
  • If your baby also has an infection with the rash, your doctor might give you a prescription for a special antifungal cream to use on your baby's rash.
  • If you use cloth diapers and wash them at home, boil them for 15 minutes after washing them to kill germs and remove soap that could irritate your baby's skin.
  • Some research suggests that because disposable diapers are more absorbent they keep babies drier. But remember that the most important thing about diapers is to change them often.
See your doctor if

  • The diaper rash occurs in the first 6 weeks of life.
  • Your baby has fever.
  • Your baby loses weight or is not eating well as usual.
  • The rash spreads to other areas, such as arms, face or scalp.
  • You notice pimples, blisters, ulcers, large bumps, or pus-filled sores
  • The rash doesn’t get better on treating diaper rash for 1 week.
  • Your baby is taking an antibiotic and develops a bright red rash with spots at its edges. This might be a yeast infection
PROGNOSIS
The rash usually responds well to treatment.
 

Reshmi V

Newbie
Banned User
Joined
Apr 13, 2012
Messages
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Location
Bangalore
#2
Diaper rash is common among babies. There is nothing to get scared of. My baby also had rashes. After I consulted a doctor, I started applying parachute's summer variant around his rash. It was soothing and kept the area around the rash cool.
 

swaga2008

Commander's of Penmai
Registered User
Blogger
Joined
Nov 16, 2011
Messages
2,350
Likes
5,607
Location
USA
#4
Diaper rash usually causes mild redness and scaling where the diaper touches your baby's skin. In certain cases, the rash can cause pimples, blisters and other sores on your baby’s buttocks, thighs or genital area. If the rash gets infected, it may become bright red and the skin may get swollen. Small red patches or spots may spread beyond the main part of the rash, even outside the diaper area.

CAUSES


  • Diaper rashes are common in babies between 4 and 15 months old. They may be noticed more when babies begin to eat solid foods.
  • Infection-Diaper rashes caused by infection with a yeast or fungus called Candida are very common in children. Candida is found everywhere in the environment. It grows best in warm, moist places, such as under a diaper. A yeast-related diaper rash is more likely to occur in babies who:
Are not kept clean and dry.
Have more frequent stools.

  • Skin irritation- Most diaper rashes are caused by skin irritation. Irritation can be caused by diapers that rub against the skin or fit too tightly. Irritation can also occur if your baby is left in a wet or dirty diaper for a long period of time. Your baby's skin can also be irritated by the soap used to wash cloth diapers, or by some brands of disposable diapers or baby wipes.
  • Plasticpants -Plastic pants that fit over diapers raise the temperature and moisture in the diaper area. Heat and moisture make it easier for diaper rash to start and for germs to grow.
  • Antibiotics-Diaper rash can also develop while the baby is on antibiotics (or if the mother is on antibiotics while breastfeeding).
SYMPTOMS

  • Bright red rash that gets bigger
  • Red or scaly areas on the labia and vagina in girls
  • Fiery red and scaly areas on the scrotum and penis in boys
  • Pimples, blisters, ulcers, large bumps, or pus-filled sores
  • Smaller red patches (called satellite lesions) that grow and blend in with the other patches.
SIGNS AND TESTS
Yeast or Candida-related diaper rashes often can be diagnosed by the appearance alone. The KOH test can confirm a Candida diagnosis.

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT


  • Always wash your hands after changing a diaper.
  • Keep your baby's diaper area clean, cool and dry. This will also help prevent new diaper rashes.
  • Change your baby's diaper often and change it soon as it’s wet, and let him or her go without a diaper when possible to let the air dry his or her skin.
  • Clean your baby’s bottom between diaper changes using warm water and a soft cloth or cotton ball to gently clean the diaper area with every diaper change. Avoid rubbing or scrubbing the area. A squirt bottle of water may be used for sensitive areas
  • Pat the area dry or allow to air-dry
  • Put diapers on loosely. Diapers that are too tight don't allow enough air and may rub and irritate the baby's waist or thighs
  • Lay your baby on a towel without a diaper on whenever possible. The more time the baby can be kept out of a diaper, the better.
  • Ask your doctor if a diaper rash cream would be helpful. Zinc oxide or petroleum jelly-based products help keep moisture away from baby's skin when applied to completely clean, dry skin.Do not use creams that contain boric acid, camphor, phenol, methyl salicylate or compound of benzoin tincture. These things can be harmful.
  • Using highly absorbent diapers helps keep the skin dry and reduces the chance of getting an infection.
  • Avoid using wipes and soap that have alcohol or perfume. They may dry out or irritate the skin more.
  • Avoid using plastic pants or diapers with plastic edges.
  • If the rash persists change the type of diaper, wipes or soap you are using.
TREATMENT

  • Do not use talcum powder or cornstarch. Talcum powder can get in your baby's lungs. Cornstarch may make a diaper rash caused by a yeast infection worse.
  • If your baby also has an infection with the rash, your doctor might give you a prescription for a special antifungal cream to use on your baby's rash.
  • If you use cloth diapers and wash them at home, boil them for 15 minutes after washing them to kill germs and remove soap that could irritate your baby's skin.
  • Some research suggests that because disposable diapers are more absorbent they keep babies drier. But remember that the most important thing about diapers is to change them often.
See your doctor if

  • The diaper rash occurs in the first 6 weeks of life.
  • Your baby has fever.
  • Your baby loses weight or is not eating well as usual.
  • The rash spreads to other areas, such as arms, face or scalp.
  • You notice pimples, blisters, ulcers, large bumps, or pus-filled sores
  • The rash doesn’t get better on treating diaper rash for 1 week.
  • Your baby is taking an antibiotic and develops a bright red rash with spots at its edges. This might be a yeast infection
PROGNOSIS
The rash usually responds well to treatment.
useful and nice info nisha.... thanks for sharing...:thumbsup:thumbsup
 

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