Global Business News

vijigermany

Lord of Penmai
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
107,004
Likes
22,092
Location
Germany
#1
Vishal Sikka gifts iPhone 6s to 3,000 top performers

Infosys CEO Vishal Sikka played Santa Claus to top performers in the company during the holiday season. He gifted iPhone 6s to 3,000 employees, an unusual gesture for the company and perhaps part of an effort to stem the high attrition rate.

The gift was accompanied by a mail from Sikka, where he addressed the employees as friends. The mail read: "Thinking back on 2014 feels good, doesn't it? There was so much you wanted to accomplish with seemingly so little time to do it all. Now, as you stand on the brink of the New Year and look back, there is the satisfying realization that a great part of it actually got done. This feeling is not unlike the one Kahlil Gibran evokes in his lyrical commentary on work - `When you work, you are a flute through whose heart the whispering of the hours turns to music'."

Sikka said achieving what Infosys had "took your boundless energy and extraordinary effort". "And I believe it's not enough that we simply recognize it, we must celebrate it. That's why I am so happy that we are presenting you with a Holiday Bonus - the cool new Apple iPhone 6. A gift that'll always remind you and your teammates of the exceptional value you delivered for Infosys," he said.

Sikka's "holiday bonus" came as a big surprise to employees. One employee said they had not been indulged in this manner before.

Corporates have been finding new ways to reward top performers, instead of simply handing out more cash. HCL Technologies recently offered around 130 of its top performers the option of driving home a Mercedes or taking their family and friends on an all-expenses-paid international or domestic holiday.



In Infosys's case, experts feel the effort would be part of an attempt to curb attrition that has been the highest among the top five Indian IT companies. The $8.2-billion IT company's attrition rate touched a record high of 20.1% in the September quarter. The company, which has 1.65 lakh employees, has been taking a number of steps to bring attrition down, including through quarterly promotions, conversion of variable pay to fixed pay, and involvement of employees in decision-making. There's also been a stream of positive communication from Sikka, including efforts to reach out personally to employees putting in their papers to persuade them to stay, and calling on former employees to return to Infosys.

In his latest communication, he has praised employees for their keenness to learn, adapt, renew and create new ways of working. "As we march forward, please continue to look for ways - little and large - that improve efficiency for us and our clients. Look for new ideas that better prepare us and our clients for the future. Learn and teach a new skill or two. Everyone around you looks up to you and it is this approach to work that will help us evolve into the next-generation IT services company that we aspire to be - with you at the heart and centre of it," he said in his letter.
 

vijigermany

Lord of Penmai
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
107,004
Likes
22,092
Location
Germany
#2
Oracle picks Bengaluru boy Thomas Kurian for top job

Boy from Bengaluru, Thomas Kurian, 48, has been elevated as president of Oracle responsible for software development, making him perhaps the single most senior executive in the company after co-CEOs Safra Catz and Mark Hurd. Kurian, who joined the $38-billion US company in 1996, was executive VP (product development).

Indians are now at top levels in many IT firms - the notable being Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, and Sundar Pichai, head of most major Google products. A recent entrant is Bhaskar Ghosh, management committee member and group chief executive of technology delivery at Accenture.

Kurian is an alumnus of Bengaluru's St Joseph's Boys High School. He holds a BA in electrical engineering from Princeton University, where he graduated summa cum laude (highest distinction). He has an MBA from Stanford University where he was an Arjay Miller scholar. He has served as an advisory member on the boards of several international venture funds and software companies. In Oracle, he has held various product management and development positions.

An Oracle India spokesperson confirmed Kurian's elevation, but did not respond to a question whether any other executive had been similarly promoted. On Oracle's website, the highest designation among executives below the CEOs is executive vice-president. If no other executive has been promoted, then Kurian becomes the only president in the company.

Oracle chairman Larry Ellison wrote an email to employees to announce Kurian's elevation. "I'm pleased to announce that Thomas Kurian has been promoted to president of Oracle, responsible for software development. He has a long track record of developing suites of software products that go to achieve pre-eminent success in the marketplace. His first major engineering effort was developing the Oracle suite of Fusion Middleware," he wrote. Oracle Fusion Middleware is a business innovation platform for the enterprise and the cloud that enables enterprise to create and run applications maximizing IT efficiency.

Ellison, in his email to employees on Thursday, said Kurian was focusing on engineering products required to transition software technology to the Oracle Cloud. "The transition is going well with the Oracle cloud sales starting to take off...The world can get a glimpse of how well Thomas and his team are doing their job," he said.




Boy from Bengaluru, Thomas Kurian, 48
 

vijigermany

Lord of Penmai
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
107,004
Likes
22,092
Location
Germany
#3
Human poop into potable water? Yes, Bill Gates makes it a reality!

The innovative sewage plant can turn human faeces into electricity and clean drinking water.



Billions of people who suffer due to contaminated water supply and do not even have access to clean drinking water will benefit from this amazing invention.
Around 2 billion or 35 per cent of the world’s population lack proper sanitation facilities. To make matters worse, human waste contaminates drinking water putting the lives of millions people and children in danger.
According to Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, the solution is to build a safe and affordable way to get rid of human waste, so that millions of lives are saved and children can grow up in a healthy environment.


Backing a game changer project, Gates has joined hands with a Seattle-based company, Janicki Bioenergy to develop a plant, which can turn human faeces into potable water and electricity.
The plant called Omniprocessor has been designed and built by Seattle-based Janicki Bioenergy and supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

The facility burns human waste at a high temperature (1000 degrees Celsius) so there is no foul smell and it meets all the emissions standards set by the US government.

After tasting the water treated at the plant, Gates said in his blog post, “It tasted as good as any I’ve had out of a bottle. And having studied the engineering behind it, I would happily drink it every day. It’s that safe.”



Explaining the new technology could be game changer in countries like India, Bill Gates in blog says, “Diseases caused by poor sanitation kill some 700,000 children every year. If we can develop safe, affordable ways to get rid of human waste, we can prevent many of those deaths and help more children grow up healthy.”

The machine's water treatment uses multiple filters to ensure safe and pure water.

With the use of a steam engine, it produces more than enough energy to burn the next batch of waste. “The next-generation processor, more advanced than the one I saw, will handle waste from 100,000 people, producing up to 86,000 liters of potable water a day and a net 250 kw of electricity,” Gates explains in his blog.



Janicki Bioenergy’s founder Peter Janicki has travelled to Africa and India to study how these plants can be cost effectively implemented.

Gates aims to make the processors cheap so that entrepreneurs in countries like India can invest and start waste-treatment businesses.
“The processor would turn waste into a commodity with real value in the marketplace. It’s the ultimate example of that old expression: one man’s trash is another man’s treasure,” Gates sums up his commitment to the latest project.
 

vijigermany

Lord of Penmai
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
107,004
Likes
22,092
Location
Germany
#4
Smart phone? Nah, smart man!

To be connected, do you really have to be connected? While for some this could be a matter of philosophical inquiry, other more evolved minds have already arrived at the answer. AdityaPuri, managing director of HDFC, for one remains unconvinced about the merits of constantly being on ping mode. Other top execs may sometimes have their attention diverted by important calls or texts during meetings, but not Mr Puri.


Sure, there is a phone and it works — but only at the pleasure of its master. The same goes for his after-work life too which the honcho protects zealously, making sure that no lines (especially of the cellphone variety) are crossed, except during emergencies. Clearly a man who knows when to switch on — and switch off.
 

vijigermany

Lord of Penmai
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
107,004
Likes
22,092
Location
Germany
#5
How to Run a Business From Home

1. Give Yourself a Personality Check
"Being a home-based business owner is not for everybody. Focusing has never really been my problem, but some people physically need to drive away from their house to find structure. The first part of starting a home-based business is recognizing what kind of personality you have. If you need someone else to give you that structure, or if you are a procrastinator, a home office is probably not the best thing for you." --Jim Anderson, LeadDog Consulting

2. Be Patient
"A home-based business doesn't get started in a day. I was able to set up my website quickly, but I didn't make my first sale until a little more than a month after I launched IWearYourShirt.com. When I first started, I really had no Twitter following, either. But I said to myself that as long as I keep working at this, something will come of it. My persistence paid off because by January, only three months after launch, I had sold out of half my inventory for the year." -- Jason Sadler, IWearYourShirt.com

3. Make a Plan -- and Stick to It
"When we started Games2U, we put a list together of what we wanted it to be. We knew we didn't ever want to have a retail business -- mobile and home-based was essential to our concept. We wanted a business that needed very little head count, and one that anybody could own and operate on their own, which is what a lot of our franchisees do. They are their own boss and don't even have to have employees." -- David Pikoff, Games2U

4. You Work at Home. Don't Try to Hide It
"First and foremost, I chose to run my business from home. When I started my Web consultancy, Soapbxx, it became a constant migraine with all the overhead and office space. I've been running Soapbxx from home now for four years. We are brutally honest with our structure and have never lost a client. I find that total honesty about being a home-based business makes everything run better and feel more authentic." -- Amanda Steinberg, Soapbxx and Daily Worth

5. Keep Your Family Out of It
"Being a stay-at-home dad and a new business owner takes a lot of discipline. I usually get up early around 4 a.m. and try to get as much done in terms of planning and organizing until my wife leaves for work at 7. I work until my daughter wakes up around 11, and then it's her time. I try not to keep her around work too much, so we'll go into the other room and play and I'll go back to work when she's napping or once my wife gets home." -- Chris Jordan, Atlanta Insurance Live

6. Keep a Checklist
"Each morning, before you begin work, write down the items that you need to accomplish by the end of your day. It helps to rate each item according to priority, from high to low. Even if you don't complete your list, the high priority items will get done first. Remember, you can't blame unfinished work on your co-workers!" -- Franklin Antoian, IBodyFit.com

7. Remember to Punch Out
"One of the downfalls to being a home-based business is that if you wanted to, you could always be working. When I first started Shop Around Tours, it was so important to build the business, so whenever the phone would ring, I would answer, no matter what time of night it was. After answering a call in the middle of the night and one at 6 a.m., I decided I wasn't going to do that anymore and resolved to answer the business phone during business hours. And that means no Sunday nights either!" -- Deborah Mayer, Shop Around Tours

8. Practice the Art of Juggling
"Being a home-based business is a juggling act, and the key to it is knowing which balls are glass and which are rubber. I go into every day not trying to drop those glass balls, which are my two kids. I don't necessarily think that balance is possible because there is always one element that takes priority in your life and the key to succeeding is knowing what that priority is." -- Michelle Tunno Buelow, Bella Tunno

9. Cut the Cord Every So Often
"There are days where I won't even open my Twitter or Facebook accounts, just so I can tune out and focus on my goals. Just because you are connected all the time doesn't mean you have to be available all the time too. Set up absolute productive time for yourself where you don't go on IM, or you don't respond to e-mails. I also force myself to take at least an hour for lunch every day, otherwise it's very tempting to keep the laptop open while you're eating and not get any separation." -- Michael Sitarzewski, Callisto.fm and HyperSites
 

vijigermany

Lord of Penmai
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
107,004
Likes
22,092
Location
Germany
#6
[h=1]Things Every Business Owner Should Know[/h]
Always remember: Cash is king.
Cash crunches happen from time to time, but if they are chronic at your company, then you may have to re-think the way you do business. Though cash-flow squeezes often seem mystifying, there are only a few explanations: Your gross margins may be too low, caused by discounted prices or out-of-control direct costs. Your overhead, including rent and payroll, may be too high. Your payment terms may be too liberal or your billing procedures too slack. You may be tying too much money up in accounts receivable or you have too much debt from nonpaying customers. Finally, it is also possible that you are holding too much inventory. If you feel tight on cash, investigate each of these possibilities and figure out which one is causing the biggest drain on your bank account.

[h=2]Cash may be king, but it's not everything.[/h]A business, and the person who owns it, can have a material impact on the world well beyond the dollars attached to it. So, money aside, it's important to have a mission, and stick to it. Example: One of the most satisfied and respected business owners we've met in a long time is Tim O'Reilly, the founder of O'Reilly Media, a company that publishes magazines and books and hosts events. "My original business model—I actually wrote this down—was 'interesting work for interesting people,'" O'Reilly told Inc. The company he built is today one of the most forward-looking businesses in Silicon Valley; it delivers on that initial promise, and has managed to thrive despite industry forces that have often been unfavorable.
 

vijigermany

Lord of Penmai
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
107,004
Likes
22,092
Location
Germany
#7
Things Every Business Owner Should Know
Culture matters.

Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh built his company into an exemplar of great service by first figuring out what he needed to do to treat his employees well. The answer? Plenty of individuality and autonomy, a pride in human weirdness, cheers and off-hours fraternizing, and figuring out how to weed out half-hearted employees before they bring everybody else down. It's worth noting that Zappos does not pay high wages and the work itself, in a call center and a fulfillment warehouse, is not especially glamorous. Still, by focusing on his company' s culture, and how it creates a positive atmosphere, Hsieh has built a billion-dollar business.


Systems can be humane.

Nick Sarillo of Nick's Pizza & Pub in suburban Chicago has built his company's culture by using a form of management that we dubbed "trust and track." The system defines the basic tasks of the business down to the letter, then trusts workers to consult lists of directions in order to complete these tasks. Sequences are mapped out, but particular duties are not assigned. Workers are expected to take initiative. "Managers trained in command and control think it's their responsibility to tell people what to do," Sarillo says. "They like having that power. It gives them their sense of self-worth. But when you manage that way, people see it, and they start waiting for you to tell them what to do. You wind up with too much on your plate, and things fall through the cracks. It's not efficient or effective.
 

vijigermany

Lord of Penmai
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
107,004
Likes
22,092
Location
Germany
#8
Things Every Business Owner Should Know

Character is key when hiring new employees.

"In many companies, the person who talks the best usually gets the job," observes Whole Foods CEO John Mackey. But his view of the skills to look for in a job candidate, especially for a leadership position, has evolved over the years as he has seen confident, fluent employees fall short on the merits of their work. Now, he looks for character over communications skills, and tries to promote from within as much as possible. "I look for somebody who has classic virtues such as integrity, honesty, courage, love, and wisdom," Mackey told Inc. in 2009. "I think for leadership positions, emotional intelligence is more important than cognitive intelligence."


To grow, you must first learn to delegate and to trust.

For a business to grow and be healthy, the founder has to trust his or her managers, the managers have to trust their staff members, and so on. Tom Colicchio of the Craft Restaurant Group in New York City has learned this lesson as his business has expanded to include multiple restaurants and a chain of upscale cafés. "In order to open up multiple locations as a chef or a baker, you have to check your ego at the door," he told Inc. in 2008. "You have to rely on the fact that you can train someone, and that he or she will put his or her heart and soul into the business as much as you would. If you don't have that trust, it won't work."
 

vijigermany

Lord of Penmai
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
107,004
Likes
22,092
Location
Germany
#9
Things Every Business Owner Should Know

[h=2]Plan for rainy days.[/h]Jack Stack is a paranoid fellow. The chairman of SRC Holdings, a Springfield, Missouri, business with manufacturing and other interests, puts his managers through a rigorous exercise each year of planning for contingencies that include recession, credit crunches, and various catastrophes. As a result, when the financial crisis struck, the company was able to navigate through the uncertain period relatively unscathed. Stack's advice to today's entrepreneurs is to always have a Plan B, in part to ensure your survival and in part to spur innovative and creative thinking at your company. "Our values drove our paranoia. Our paranoia drove our contingency planning. And our contingency planning drove our diversification," he told Inc. in 2009. "We knew the more we diversified, the safer we would be."

[h=2]Working with partners is easier said than done.[/h]A strategic or joint-venture partner can help your company enter new lines of business, and expand at a more rapid clip than you could otherwise. But partnerships are tricky to manage. Make sure you research the reputations of potential partners with care, establish both the big-picture objective of a deal as well as the nitty-gritty who knows what, identify your champion within the other organization, and put in writing a mechanism for ending the partnership amicably.
 

vijigermany

Lord of Penmai
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
107,004
Likes
22,092
Location
Germany
#10
Things Every Business Owner Should Know

[h=2]Keeping good records is also easier said than done.[/h]Sometimes the most trivial-seeming matters can really trip you up. For example, many small businesses rely on contingent labor. Though the practice is economical and affords flexibility, it can lead to tax and legal problems if human resources requirements are not managed carefully. In most instances, it is wise to execute a written contract with each independent contractor you use. The document should spell out that he or she is a contractor, and outline the work that will be completed by him or her—but it should not get into how that work will be completed.

[h=2]To engage workers, let them call (some of) the shots.[/h]Tasty Catering in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, is run by two councils that make major company decisions. One of the $5.3 million company's three owners sits on each council, as do two employees selected at random to serve. The councils have reshaped the business, changing the benefits package, reconfiguring the org chart, and coming up with a set of steps to respond to the recession. Not every decision goes through the councils—managers reserve the right to promote workers, for example—but the result is a company where worker engagement is palpable and financial performance is steady.
 

Similar threads

Important Announcements!

Latest Posts

Type in Tamil

Click here to go to Google transliteration page. Type there in Tamil and copy and paste it.